Giants

Report: Ex-Giant Burrell retires

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Report: Ex-Giant Burrell retires

Outfielder Pat Burrell, who helped the Giants to a World Series in 2010, has retired after 12 big-league seasons, according to a report published Monday.

MLBTradeRumors.com published a story indicating that Burrell had hung up his spikes but did not cite a specific source. Fox Sports' baseball reporter Ken Rosenthal confirmed the news.

Burrell hit 18 home runs for the Giants in 2010. He batted .266 with 51 RBIs in 96 games that season, and took over as the everyday left fielder. But he spent much of 2011 battling a foot injury that limited him to 92 games.

Burrell was placed on the disabled list on July 15 with a mid-right foot strain and didn't play again until Aug. 31, though he was still in pain after missing 43 games.

On the last day of the season, a 6-3 loss to Colorado at AT&T Park, Burrell fought tears after running in from left field to a standing ovation before the start of the seventh inning -- Giants manager Bruce Bochy's way of honoring the veteran in what might have been his final game. An emotional Burrell hugged and high-fived his teammates and came back out of the dugout for a curtain call, waving to the fans.

He is No. 4 all-time on the Phillies' career home runs list. He won a World Series with Philadelphia in 2008.
The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Giancarlo Stanton: Barry Bonds' 73 not the home run record

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AP

Giancarlo Stanton: Barry Bonds' 73 not the home run record

In 1961, Roger Maris hit a record 61 home runs.

In 1998, Mark McGwire broke the record when he hit 70.

In 2001, Barry Bonds crushed 73.

So who is the single-season home run king?

"It doesn’t matter,’’ Giancarlo Stanton told Dave Hyde of the Sun Sentinel. “The record is the record. But, personally, I do (think 61 is the record)."

Whoa.

With 43 games remaining, Stanton has hit 44 home runs. He's on pace to hit 60.

Does Stanton really believe 61 is the legitimate number?

As Hyde writes:

After saying he considered Maris’ record the real one, after saying 61 home runs always was the number he knew as a kid, he thought about it for a while in the Marlins’ clubhouse following their 8-1 win against San Francisco.

He wanted to clarify his thoughts some more. So he did something he rarely does. He walked back over to the group of reporters who left him 10 minutes earlier and took another stab at the question.

He admitted he’s “at a crossroads” in an internal debate over what to think about all this. If PED users like Bonds, McGwire and Sosa need an asterisk by their name, he said, so does Babe Ruth since he only faced white pitchers.

Bonds was Stanton's hitting coach in 2016...

Bobby Evans non-committal: 'Hard to make clear on who Matt Moore is'

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AP

Bobby Evans non-committal: 'Hard to make clear on who Matt Moore is'

It's been a disastrous 2017 season for Matt Moore.

He's 3-12 with a 5.71 ERA through 24 starts.

Is he a lock to be in the 2018 rotation?

"We've got time to figure that out," GM Bobby Evans said on KNBR 680. "We have a lot invested from a trade standpoint. But ultimately, we have options on him for the next two years.

"We'd like for him to be. That's why we traded for him. But it's hard to make clear on who Matt Moore is given his struggles."

On Aug. 1, 2016, the Giants traded Matt Duffy, Lucius Fox and Michael Santos for Moore.

In 12 regular season starts last season, he went 6-5 with a 4.08 ERA.

In Game 4 against the Cubs, he allowed two runs (one earned) on two hits and two walks over eight dominant innings, while striking out 10.

The Giants have a $9 million option ($1 million buyout) on Moore in 2018 and a $10 million option ($750,000 buyout) in 2019.

"We see different Matt Moore's different outings," Evans said, "It's really an approach that he has to come to grips with, in terms of getting more out of his ability. He's got the stuff, but again when you don't get the results, it's hard for a club."

What has plagued him?

"We don't see it as a mental issue. We do see some of it mechanical and some of it in approach, and pitch selection," Evans answered. "Really a combination of things, but not so much on the mental side at all.

"His stuff is so good, it just comes and goes."