Stiglich: Bonds, Clemens get my Hall of Fame vote

Stiglich: Bonds, Clemens get my Hall of Fame vote

After a lot of careful research and consideration, I dropped my first Hall of Fame ballot in the mail earlier this week.

Talk about tricky waters to navigate.

There are so many players who are suspected of performance-enhancing drug use appearing on the ballot every year, and it’s tough to find a uniform criteria to judge everybody by. I do not take a “hard line” stance when it comes to evaluating suspected PED users for the Hall. Surely some benefited more than others by what they put in their bodies, and that’s where the ambiguity comes in and makes this such a challenging process.

I chose to judge each player case by case, based on their own individual credentials. And here’s the eight who got my vote this year, listed in alphabetical order:

Jeff Bagwell: His numbers speak for themselves — 449 homers, a .408 on-base percentage and .948 career OPS. He combined power, batting average, and patience at the plate, and he put up some of his best seasons playing home games inside the Astrodome, which did no hitter any favors. He was a unanimous NL MVP in 1994 and even won a Gold Glove at first base that same year. Not a tough call here …

Barry Bonds: It comes down to this for me when considering Bonds’ candidacy: Even if you take no stats into account past the 1998 season, when the PED suspicions really began to swirl around him, he still produced a Hall of Fame career. From 1986-98, Bonds won three MVP awards, eight Gold Gloves and was an eight-time All-Star. He hit 411 homers and averaged a 30-30 season over this 13-year period. Get him into Cooperstown. Put an asterisk by his name, place him in a separate wing along with other suspected users, whatever. Just get him in the Hall, where he belongs.

Roger Clemens: The same logic applies for me when it comes to Clemens. Taking into account his career from 1984-97, before PED suspicions might cloud his numbers for some, Clemens collected four Cy Young awards and an MVP. He went 213-118 with a 2.97 ERA and 2,882 strikeouts over this time. That strikeout total alone — not even counting the final 10 years of his career — would rank him 15th out of the 77 pitchers currently in the Hall.

Vladimir Guerrero:I wasn’t completely sure about this first-year candidate when I first began to contemplate my picks. But the numbers speak for themselves: a .318 batting average, 449 homers, 1,496 RBI, a .931 OPS. Particularly impressive was a 10-year stretch (1998-2007) during which he hit .327 with 353 homers and a .980 OPS. He notched two 30-30 seasons and in 2002 fell just one homer shy of becoming just the fifth member of the 40-40 club. One of the game’s great all-around talents. Right this way, Vlad.

Trevor Hoffman: He gained 67 percent of the vote last year, his first on the ballot, bringing him close to the 75 percent needed for induction. The longtime Padres closer is getting in sooner rather than later. Hoffman ranks second all-time with 601 saves, and he’s 123 ahead of No. 3 on that list (Lee Smith, who happens to be in his final year on the ballot). I didn’t over-think this one. Punch Hoffman’s ticket …

Tim Raines: His impressive career body of work caught me by surprise a bit, and I think I know why. While Raines was wreaking his havoc with the Expos in the National League, Rickey Henderson was doing the same with the A’s in the American League. In my mind, it always seemed Rickey’s exploits were dwarfing Raines’ (West Coast bias!!!). At any rate, Raines is one of only five players with 800-plus stolen bases. The other four are all in the Hall of Fame. “Rock” gets in …

Ivan Rodriguez:A first-ballot candidate with a PED cloud hanging over him. Jose Canseco claimed to have injected him with steroids while with the Rangers. But Rodriguez never tested positive for anything and was not named in the Mitchell Report. “Pudge”’s case for the Hall is overwhelming. He’s a 14-time All-Star and 13-time Gold Glove winner with one MVP award on his shelf. He hit .296 with 311 career homers, and in nine different seasons he threw out over 50 percent of runners trying to steal against him. A terrific all-around player, and it’s hard for me to believe PED’s were the driving force behind it.

Curt Schilling: Unquestionably, he’s one of the greatest postseason pitchers of all time. Schilling went 11-2 with a 2.23 ERA, four complete games and two shutouts in the playoffs, getting named the 2001 World Series Co-MVP and 1993 NLCS MVP. He’s also got 216 regular-season victories and 3,116 strikeouts to back his case. Given the views he’s expressed about journalists, I’ve got no reason to want to do this guy any favors. And his social media rants have offended so many different segments of our society. But if you keep him out of the Hall based on the “character” clause in voting guidelines, you also need to go back and evict some of the unsavory characters who already reside in Cooperstown. Schilling’s baseball resume is worthy of induction, despite what anyone might think of him as a human being.

Latest round of bullpen auditions go poorly in Giants' 50th loss

Latest round of bullpen auditions go poorly in Giants' 50th loss

SAN FRANCISCO -- Practically speaking, the 50th loss is no different than the one before or the one after, but this sport is built on milestones, and this one came quickly.

The Giants lost their 50th game on August 12 last year. This season, it was clinched when Ryder Jones grounded out in his fourth career at-bat, handing the Mets a 5-2 win on June 24. 

Bruce Bochy called losing 50 of your first 77 games "hard to believe" and "embarrassing." Johnny Cueto, who went seven strong, said the reality was "hard and sad." Brandon Belt, who got Cueto off the hook for a loss, agreed with his manager.

"That's a pretty good word to use -- it is embarrassing to come out and lose every day, especially with the group of guys we have," Belt said. "When you're losing as much as this, it is embarrassing. We're trying to do whatever we can to turn this thing around."

Lately, that has meant changes to the roster. It is officially audition season, and in that respect, it was not a particularly inspiring day for the bullpen. The Giants felt they would have a better mix this year, but it hasn't played out. Instead, they're once again trying to find pieces for the next successful Giants bullpen.

With Hunter Strickland suspended and Derek Law in the minors, two young relievers, a middle-innings stalwart, and a newcomer pitched the final two frames. They gave up four runs.

Sam Dyson was the first on the mound in the eighth. Belt had homered a few minutes earlier, tying a good starter's duel. Dyson gave up a leadoff triple to Curtis Granderson and walked Asdrubal Cabrera before throwing two good sliders past Yoenis Cespedes for the strikeout. With two lefties coming up and the go-ahead run still on third, Bochy turned to Steven Okert. He immediately gave up a seeing-eye RBI single to Jay Bruce. Wilmer Flores doubled off George Kontos later in the frame to make it 3-1. 

In the ninth, Kyle Crick showed some of the wildness that kept him in the minors for seven years. He, too, gave up a leadoff triple, a sin you always pay for. A walk helped put another run into scoring position and a wild pitch extended the Mets’ lead to four. 

Before the game, Bochy talked of getting an extended look at Jones. He was 0-for-4 in his first big league game but he’ll be back out there tomorrow. It’s time to fight for a job, and the same holds true of some relievers who didn’t fare well Saturday. It is a group with a closer locked into a longterm deal and little else decided. 

Are Strickland or Law eighth-inning guys? Will Dyson be a worthwhile reclamation project? Will Kontos be back, and will he carve out a different role? Are Okert and Josh Osich capable of giving Bochy lefties he trusts? Is Crick’s improvement in Triple-A a sign of things to come? There are many questions to be answered over the next three months. 

“This is a good time for them, this is what players get up here for, to show what they can do,” Bochy said. “Because of our situation, we’re going to take a look at these guys and we know there are going to be growing pains.”

Instant Analysis: Five takeaways from Giants' 50th loss of the season

Instant Analysis: Five takeaways from Giants' 50th loss of the season

BOX SCORE

SAN FRANCISCO — The promotion of an intriguing prospect can bring a certain buzz to the ballpark. It didn’t last long. 

The debut of Ryder Jones came in the latest flat performance from the Giants, who collapsed late and fell 5-2 to the Mets. The loss was their 50th of the season. They did not lose their 50th game last season until August 12. 

With the score tied in the eighth, Curtis Granderson crushed a leadoff triple into the alley. Sam Dyson walked the next batter and then whiffed Yoenis Cespedes, but Jay Bruce greeted Steven Okert with an RBI single to right. It kept going poorly from there. 

Here are five things to know from a cool day by the water … 

—- Jones grounded out to second in his first at-bat and then flied out to center, grounded out to first, and grounded out to second. He had one chance in the field, starting a double play that ended the second inning.  

—- Johnny Cueto seems to have turned a corner. Over his past two starts, he has allowed just three earned runs over 14 innings. Whether they trade him or not, the Giants certainly could use a nice little hot streak for the next six weeks. 

—- A few seconds after Bruce Bochy shook Cueto’s hand, Brandon Belt got him off the hook for a loss. He hit the first pitch of the bottom of the seventh into the seats in left-center, tying the game. The homer was Belt’s 14th. He’s on pace for 29. 

—- The Mets got eight one-run innings out of Jacob deGrom, who is quietly the most reliable of a star-studded rotation. He struck out seven and gave up just four hits. 

—- If Madison Bumgarner wants another Silver Slugger Award, he’ll have to chase down deGrom, who hit a homer in his last start. His single in the third was his 10th hit, and he finished the day with a .294 average.