Stow transferred to rehab

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Stow transferred to rehab

Bryan Stow was released from San Francisco General Hospital Tuesday and transferred to a rehabilitation center, the latest step in his return from a savage beating on Opening Day.

Dr. Geoff Manley, the hospital's chief of neurosurgery, said that Stow was released to an undisclosed facility.

"Bryan has been an extremely challenging patient," saidf Manley. "It has been a roller coaster, but he is young and strong and has made tremendous advances."

Stow has been hospitalized since being attacked at Dodgers Stadium on March 31.

Stow has been making slow but steady progress in his recovery, after spending months in a coma. Recently, he was visited by Giants manager Bruce Bochy and members of the rock band Queensryche.

Stow was invited by Bochy to throw out the first pitch at San Francisco's 2012 season. When family members told Stow that thousands of people were looking forward to him throwing out the ceremonial first pitch in 2012, Stow said, "I'm there."

Last week Stow had the tube removed following his tracheotomy procedure, and "the site has closed and headed," according to a report on his family's website. Stow continues to speak with a stronger and clearer voice, according to the latest update.

In September, Stow said his children's names for the first time, continuing a pattern of remarkable progress for the Santa Cruz paramedic and father of two.

In August, attorneys for Stow estimated his medical expenses at roughly 50 million. Their statement was filed as part of a lawsuit filed May 24 by Stow and his children against Dodgers owner Frank McCourt.

Two suspects, Louie Sanchez, 29, and Marvin Norwood, 30, are charged with mayhem, assault and battery in the attack on Stow.

Prosecutors contend that Sanchez hit two of Stow's friends before chasing down Stow and punching him from behind in the side of his head.

Deputy Dist. Atty. Gary Hearnsberger has stated that Sanchez and Norwood pose a threat to public safety. Both have access to firearms, prosecutors allege. A search of Norwood's home turned up five firearms, including an AR-15 assault rifle.

Norwood has a prior assault conviction and Sanchez has prior convictions for drunk driving and evading police.
The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Instant Analysis: Five takeaways as Giants get swept by Mets at home

Instant Analysis: Five takeaways as Giants get swept by Mets at home

BOX SCORE

SAN FRANCISCO — The Mets spent the first half of this week in Los Angeles, where they got swept by the Dodgers and outscored 36-11. Their beat writers publicly wrote an end to any thoughts of the postseason. The fan base renewed the calls for manager Terry Collins to be fired. 

That’s where they were. And then they flew to San Francisco. 

AT&T Park continues to be a place where others get healthy, and this weekend it was the Mets. The Giants lost 8-2 on Sunday, getting swept by a similarly disappointing team. They have lost 12 of their last 13 games. 

There’s not much more to be said about it, but I did anyway. Here are five things to know from the day a relief pitcher got an at-bat but it would have been far too cruel to text your friends … 

—- Matt Moore’s line: 4 1/3 innings, seven hits, five earned runs, three walks, five strikeouts. Through 16 starts, he has a 6.04 ERA and 1.61 WHIP. He ranks last among qualified NL starters in ERA. Only Matt Cain (1.73) has a worse WHIP. Good times. 

—- Mets righty Rafael Montero entered with an 0-4 record and 6.49 ERA. He gave up one run in 5 2/3 innings. Good times. 

—- With runners on the corners and two outs in the third inning, Brandon Belt strolled to the plate. He leads the team in homers. Hunter Pence tried to steal second for some reason and he was caught, ending the inning and keeping Belt from batting in a two-run game. Good times. 

—- With two on and no outs in the sixth, the Giants sent the runners to make sure Buster Posey didn’t hit into a double play. Posey popped up softly to first and Joe Panik was doubled off of second. Good times. 

—- One last bit of bad news: Austin Slater was removed from the game with a tight right hip flexor. 

Barry Bonds predicts he can still smash Splash Hit: 'Without a doubt'

Barry Bonds predicts he can still smash Splash Hit: 'Without a doubt'

Barry Bonds stepped into Giants' broadcast booth with Duane Kuiper and Mike Krukow during the top of the third inning Sunday and Kuiper immediately brought up the shape Bonds is in at 52 years old. 

"Still think you can play, probably?" Kuiper asked Bonds. 

After giving Kuiper the look, Bonds replied, "About an inning or two."

Moments later, the cameras moved to McCovey Cove past the right field wall at AT&T Park where Bonds famously hit home runs deep into the water. Of the 73 Splash Hits off Giants bats into the cove, Bonds is responsible for 35 of them. 

Now an avid cyclist who still picks up a bat from time to time, Bonds is fully confident that number would rise if he stepped into the batter's box again. 

"I promise you I will," Bonds replied when Krukow asked if he could still hit home runs into the water. "Without a doubt." 

Krukow predicted Bonds would need 10 swings to get it done. Bonds says he might need just a few more.

"Well it would take me eight swings to get warmed up, three pop ups and then I'd get it," he said with a laugh. 

During spring training this year, Bonds joined the Giants as a special instructor. And he proved his claim of more Splash Hits could certainly be true as he showed off his legendary swing and cracked balls over the wall in Scottsdale

Bonds hit his final home run of his career, No. 762, on Sept. 5, 2007 on the road against the Rockies in a 5-3 Giants win. The Giants are adding Bonds to their Wall of Fame on July 8.