2017 All-Star Teacher finalist Dale Waldo

2017 All-Star Teacher finalist Dale Waldo

Mr. Waldo began teaching in 2001 after spending 23 years in private industry in Sales and Technology Management positions with several multi-national companies. In 2001 he started as an Intern teacher at Folsom Cordova Unified School District at Mitchell Middle School teaching technology to middle school students. He got his teaching credential from Project Pipeline the same year. Mr. Waldo has taught 6th, 7th and 8th graders throughout his entire teaching career. He currently teaches 6 – 8th grade Project Lead The Way classes and is trained in ten of the GTT units. Mr. Waldo has coached Track and also is the MineCraft Club and Engineering Club Advisor at his current middle school, Folsom Middle School.

Mr. Waldo believes strongly in the importance of student engagement and hands learning environment. Mr. Waldo is constantly adapting and refining curricula that will engage all students and give them a Life Long Learning experience.  Examples of Mr. Waldo’s commitment to student learning is his constant drive to get materials to make his student’s learning environment better such as power tools donated by Harbor Freight and soliciting enough funds to acquire eight 3D printers. His students are able to learn Additive and Subtractive Manufacturing in middle school which is ahead of the usual timeframe. 

Mr. Waldo in his first year at FMS converted an old classroom into a fully functioning Fabrication room with multiple woodworking tools (Subtractive Manufacturing). The next year he began to acquire 3D printers and created an Additive Manufacturing environment for his students.

Mr. Waldo has spent his entire sixteen years teaching in the Folsom Cordova USD after his twenty-three years in industry. He is often heard saying to students “BEST Day Ever!” 

Mr Waldo has a Business Administration Degree from CSU Chico and has been a PLTW teacher for twelve of his sixteen years of teaching. He spent several years as a Master Teacher for PLTW training new teachers to PLTW at colleges and Universities throughout the U.S. during the summer months.

In 2014 Mr. Waldo received the PLTW California Middle School Teacher of the Year Award.

Mr.Waldo has been married to his lovely wife, Diana, for thirty years and has two awesome children Tyler and Jennifer “JJ”. Tyler graduated from CSU Chico with a Degree in Business Information Systems and JJ is pursuing a Doctorate Degree in STEM Cell Research.

If he is fortunate enough to win the All Star teacher award, Mr. Waldo plans to use the $20,000 to complete the Folsom Middle School Makers Lab where all teachers can engage their students in Hands On Learning.

Mr. Waldo truly makes everyday “The Best Day Ever” for his students!

With eighth round TKO, Ward stops Kovalev in rematch, moves to 32-0

With eighth round TKO, Ward stops Kovalev in rematch, moves to 32-0

LAS VEGAS -- Andre Ward vowed he would leave no doubt this time around and he didn't, stopping Sergey Kovalev in the eighth round Saturday night to win their light heavyweight title rematch.

The undefeated Ward turned the fight around with a big right hand that wobbled Kovalev, then swarmed all over him. Kovalev was in the neutral corner and Ward was landing shots to the body when Kovalev sat on the ring rope and referee Tony Weeks signaled an end to the bout at 2:29 of the eighth.

"I knew this time it was going to be different," Ward said.

The fight had been close until Ward (32-0) turned it around with the right hand, with Kovalev (30-2-1) winning the early rounds before Ward began making adjustments and Kovalev began tiring. Both fighters complained of dirty tactics and Weeks spent a lot of his time breaking up clinches.

Ward won the first fight in November, coming back from a second round knockdown to get a controversial decision. The rematch seemed just as close until Ward landed the right hand that caused Kovalev's legs to wobble.

"He's a great fighter," Ward said. "You've got to raise your game to the next level and thankfully that's what we did tonight."

Kovalev complained that Ward hit him with two low blows in the final exchange, forcing him to sit on the first rope.

"Why stop the fight?" he said. "I could have continued to fight."

The fight was rough and tumble from the beginning, much like when the two met the first time when both were unbeaten. But while Kovalev was supposed to be the puncher it was a big right hand by Ward that landed midway through the eighth.

"I could tell he was reacting to my body shots and I knew I had him then," Ward said. "I knew he was hurt."

Ward was up by a point on two scorecards and down three points on the third going into the eighth. But Kovalev was fading, just as he had in the first fight, and he picked up the pace. Kovalev was credited with throwing 407 punches to 238 for Ward, and outlanding him 95-80.

There was genuine dislike between the two fighters, born largely out of their first fight. Neither made any effort to touch gloves when given their final instructions, and once the bell rang, they both went after each other.

The fight itself played out early somewhat like the first one, with Kovalev starting out aggressively and Ward trying to find his rhythm. Weeks, meanwhile, was working hard to keep control as the two fighters clinched and hit each other behind the head, with Ward landing a low blow in the second round that doubled Kovalev over and caused Weeks to pause the bout.

He did that! Congrats @andresogward #wardkovalev2 #SOG

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Long shot Cloud Computing pulls off upset at 142nd Preakness Stakes

cloud-computing-preakness-ap.jpg
AP

Long shot Cloud Computing pulls off upset at 142nd Preakness Stakes

BALTIMORE -- Sometimes it pays to have a fresh horse.

Cloud Computing skipped the Kentucky Derby, while eventual winner Always Dreaming and Classic Empire mixed it up in the mud at Churchill Downs.

Two weeks later, Cloud Computing pounced on those two horses in the Preakness, pulling off an upset victory at 13-1 odds Saturday. He became the first horse to skip the Derby and win the second leg of the Triple Crown since filly Rachel Alexandra in 2009.

"Some of the reason that we won today was because we were patient and didn't throw an inexperienced horse against a 20-horse field in the Derby on a very difficult track," winning co-owner Seth Klarman said. "We made a great call."

Always Dreaming and Classic Empire dueled for most of the race before Classic Empire stuck his nose in front midway on the far turn. It looked as if Classic Empire would go on to win, but Cloud Computing ran him down on the outside.

Always Dreaming faded to eighth in the 10-horse field on a cool and cloudy day at Pimlico. The crowd of 140,327 and wagering total of $94,127,434 were records, bettering the marks set last year.

Ridden by Javier Castellano, Cloud Computing ran 1 3/16 miles in 1:55.98 and paid $28.80, $8.60 and $6. It was just the dark brown colt's fourth career start, the fewest of any horse in the race, and only his second win. He didn't run as a 2-year-old because of injury.

Classic Empire returned $4.40 and $4, and 31-1 shot Senior Investment was another 4 3/4 lengths back in third and paid $10.20.

New York-based trainer Chad Brown earned his first victory in a Triple Crown race. Castellano won for the second time. He rode Bernardini to victory in the 2006 Preakness.

Castellano comes from a racing family, with a father, uncle and brother who have been jockeys.

"We've been working for a long time for this moment," he said. "It's great for the family."

The 142nd Preakness had been billed as a match race between Always Dreaming and Classic Empire, and it was from the start.

They broke out of the starting gate next to each other and the fight was on. Always Dreaming took a slight lead with Classic Empire on his flank.

Meanwhile, Cloud Computing was back in third as Castellano watched the duel unfold in front of him.

Always Dreaming was the first to throw in the towel, surrendering the lead to Classic Empire midway around the final turn.

"We didn't have an excuse," said Todd Pletcher, who trains Always Dreaming. "We were in a position we expected to be, and I think the turnaround was a little too quick. He ran so hard in the Derby and today just wasn't his day."

Always Dreaming lost for the first time in five races this year. He'd won his first four by a combined 23 1/4 lengths.

Classic Empire and Julien Leparoux went into the stretch with three-length lead, seemingly on his way to the winner's circle.

At that point, trainer Mark Casse thought he was headed there, too.

"Of course," he said. "But I thought I was going to win a lot of times before, so it doesn't shock me."

But Classic Empire also paid a price for putting away Always Dreaming. Classic Empire fought on to the finish line, but couldn't hold off a fresh horse in Cloud Computing.

"Certainly I'm not going to dispute the fact that I brought in a fresh horse as part of our strategy," Brown said. "Our horse is very talented, too. Classic Empire and Always Dreaming are two outstanding horses, and our strategy was, if we are ever going to beat them let's take them on two weeks' rest when we have six (weeks), and it worked."

After Cloud Computing ran third in the Wood Memorial, Brown and the owners decided the colt would benefit from skipping the Derby. He came into the Preakness after a six-week break.

"It just didn't work out in the Wood. We just ran out of time," Brown said. "We just really zeroed in on this race, and thankfully it worked out."

The victory was especially sweet for Klarman, who grew up a few blocks from Pimlico. He turns 60 on Sunday. He and William Lawrence have been buying and racing horses together since 2006.

"This is the culmination of 25 years of hard work and learning and trying to figure this game out," said Klarman, president of the Baupost Group, a hedge fund valued at $31 billion.

"In my regular life, I'm a long-term value investor. This is gambling. It's really been a thrill and this is the highlight of our career so far as thoroughbred owners."

Klarman, who races as Klaravich Stables, is a minority owner of the Boston Red Sox.

Lookin At Lee, the Derby runner-up, was fourth. Gunnevera was fifth, followed by Multiplier and Conquest Mo Money. Hence was ninth and Term of Art last.