Hot dog thrown at Tiger Woods

505857.jpg

Hot dog thrown at Tiger Woods

From Comcast SportsNet
SAN MARTIN, Calif. (AP) -- Tiger Woods was sure to make news at CordeValle in his first tournament in seven weeks. Only it wasn't from any of his scores or any of his shots. It was from a hot dog. Even when he returned to golf last year after a sex scandal, Woods heard only the occasional heckle from the crowd or saw a plane toting a saucy message on a banner. But as he stood over a putt on the seventh green toward the end of his final round in the Frys.com Open, he heard a commotion from security and saw remnants of a hot dog being tossed in his direction. "When I looked up, the hot dog was already in the air," Woods said. "The bun was kind of disintegrating." Woods hadn't played on the PGA Tour since the middle of August, when he missed the cut at the PGA Championship amid growing questions about whether he could get his game back to where it once was, or even come close to that standard. His golf looked much improved. After playing only six rounds since the Masters while letting injuries to his left leg fully heal, he overcame a sloppy opening 73 with three straight 68s -- the first time he has had three rounds in a row in the 60s in more than a year on the PGA Tour. That amounted to progress, just not up the leaderboard. Woods wound up 10 shots behind in a tie for 30th in what will be his final PGA Tour event of the year. Still to come is the Australian Open on Nov. 10-13, followed by the Presidents Cup at Royal Melbourne. The winner was Bryce Molder, an All-American all four years at Georgia Tech who joined the tour in 2002 and had to wait nearly a decade -- this was his 132nd tournament -- to win. It wasn't easy. Molder holed a 12-foot birdie putt on the 18th that got him into a playoff with Briny Baird. Molder outlasted Baird on the sixth extra hole, the longest playoff on tour this year, by making a 6-foot birdie putt. It was a big disappointment for Baird, 0 for 348 on the PGA Tour. He went over 12 million in career earnings, the most by any player who has never won. Even so, Woods managed to produce the most bizarre moment in what already is a strange year. He stood over an 18-foot birdie putt late in his round when a 31-year-old man, whose name wasn't released, yelled out his name and tossed the hot dog in his direction. Woods backed off his birdie putt, then quickly resumed play. He missed the putt. "Some guy just came running on the green, and he had a hot dog, and evidently ... I don't know how he tried to throw it, but I was kind of focusing on my putt when he started yelling," said Woods, who didn't seem bothered by it. "Next thing I know, he laid on the ground, and looked like he wanted to be arrested because he ... put his hands behind his back and turned his head." Sgt. Jose Cardoza said the man was arrested for disturbing the peace and removed from the property. Because it was a misdemeanor, Cardoza said the man would not be taken to jail and his name not disclosed. Cardoza said only that he was from Santa Rosa. "He was very cooperative," Cardoza said. "They said, 'Why did you do this?' He just shook his head in guilt or remorse. He didn't give a reason why he did it." Cardoza said the man claimed he wasn't throwing the hot dog at Woods, rather tossing it in the air. He said the man acknowledged having a drink earlier in the day, but that the man was not drunk. Arjun Atwal, who played with Woods, said he was concerned for a moment at the sight of a fan yelling out Woods' name and approaching the green. "They could have shot him," Atwal said. "The cops could have thought it was something else." It was high drama, albeit briefly, an example that Woods attracts attention simply by being at a tournament. The longest playoff of the year. The first win for Molder. There was even 21-year-old Bud Cauley shooting 66 to finish third, which likely will be enough for him to become only the sixth player to get a PGA Tour card without going to Q-school. And a hot dog steals the show. "It was bizarre," said Rod Pampling, who also played with Woods. "This guy comes running out with a hot dog in his hand, and then he lays down and puts his hands behind his back." Woods said he never felt threatened because he was on the back end of the green and the fan never got close to him. He heard the commotion of security behind him, and when he looked up, the hot dog already was in the air. "I guess he wanted to be in the news," Woods said. "And I'm sure he will be." When he finished with a final birdie, any seriousness of the incident gave way to levity. Dan Diggins, head of security for tournament sponsor Frys Electronics, said the man would be arrested for "everything" and described him as "just an idiot." "It wasn't a chili dog," Diggins said. "That could have been really bad." The rest of Woods' round wasn't nearly as eventful. He did get on the leaderboard, before the leaders teed off, with four birdies in his opening six holes. But he missed the 16th green and made bogey, and after an easy birdie on the 17th, didn't make another one until his final hole on the par-5 ninth. He attributed that to not enough play. Because of injuries to his left leg this year that are finally healed, Woods now has played only 10 full rounds since the Masters. "I haven't played much," Woods said. "That comes with competitive flow, understanding the situations and feels, and game time is a little bit different." He is hosting a tournament at Pebble Beach next week to raise money for his foundation, and he said "family obligations" would keep him from playing the season-ending tournament at Disney.

Jose Canseco joins NBC Sports California's A's TV coverage

canseco-jose-athetics-hat.jpg
AP

Jose Canseco joins NBC Sports California's A's TV coverage

MESA, Ariz. — Through all of the controversy and sensational headlines that have marked his baseball career and beyond, one constant has stood firm in regard to Jose Canseco:

The man speaks exactly what’s on his mind.

That will serve A’s fans well as Canseco joins NBC Sports California as an on-air analyst for A’s Pregame Live and A’s Postgame Live. He’s part of a revamped lineup of former Athletics who will provide their expert insights and opinions throughout the 2017 season.

“I’ve got quite a bit of experience. I’ve pretty much been there, done all of that whether it’s on or off the field,” Canseco said. “I think the fans can expect the truth — an honest opinion, honest analysis — and hopefully in some shape or form we expand the fan base.”

The 1988 American League MVP and first player ever to hit 40 homers and steal 40 bases in the same season, Canseco’s baseball resume speaks for itself. For so many fans who grew up with a “Bash Brothers” poster on their wall, he was the defining presence of three consecutive pennant-winning A’s teams from 1988-90.

Those teams dominated with an ensemble cast of contributors. But in a time period when the Bay Area produced some of the biggest superstars across the national sports landscape, no one’s profile stood taller than Canseco’s.

“I pulled his rookie baseball card out of packs, watched him play countless games in person at the Coliseum,” said Brodie Brazil, host for A’s Pregame and Postgame Live. “It still hasn't sunk in that we've added one of the Bash Brothers to our core of analysts. The kid and adult in me are both pretty stoked.”

Canseco retired after 17 big league seasons and 462 home runs, which ranked 22nd on the all-time list when he hung up his spikes. After his playing career, he wrote the controversial tell-all book “Juiced”, which blew open just how widespread steroid use was in the major leagues.

Canseco received a hefty amount of criticism upon the book’s release. But as the years have gone by and it’s become apparent just how many players were using performance-enhancing drugs, Canseco has proven to be much more credible with the claims he made.

“It’s kind of a double-edged sword,” he said of writing “Juiced.” “It made the game better because it made the game look at what was going on internally. On the other end, because I wrote the book and went up against Major League Baseball, I got excommunicated.”

He’s enthused about taking on his first role as an analyst, and he joins NBC Sports California at a time of budding excitement surrounding the A’s and the expectation of them building a new ballpark in Oakland. Canseco, the 1986 AL Rookie of the Year, played for the A’s when they were one of the Bay Area’s hottest sports stories.

He believes a new ballpark would create the needed buzz. And, it’s not surprising that he’s got a unique preference in what he’d like to see built.

“I’m hoping for a dome to be honest with you,” he said. “It can get cold (in Oakland). The ball doesn’t carry. I would push for a dome. I think baseball is so different from other sports. It’s definitely the best sport in the world. The Oakland A’s deserve their own stadium.”

OK, so perhaps a dome isn’t in the forefront of the A’s thoughts. But remember, one fan proposed to team president Dave Kaval the idea of a floating stadium on the Bay, so Kaval has heard wackier suggestions.

Canseco can draw on the experience of having played for seven different big league organizations in providing his analysis.

He was preparing for Game 3 of the 1989 World Series when the Loma Prieta earthquake rocked Candlestick Park. In the 1988 World Series, he was playing right field when Kirk Gibson’s legendary home run went soaring over his head.

He’s traveled a unique road in the game, and he’s willing to speak frankly about the peaks and valleys.

“It’s the first time I’ve gotten the opportunity to do something like this,” Canseco said. “… Maybe fans would like to hear what my thoughts are, how things can be fixed or made better for the Oakland A’s.”

49ers keep all options open with No. 2 overall pick

49ers keep all options open with No. 2 overall pick

PHOENIX -- If the Cleveland Browns’ only reasonable decision with the top overall pick consists of Myles Garrett or Myles Garrett, the 49ers have considerably more options at No. 2 overall.

After Garrett, the Texas A&M pass-rusher, there appears to be no consensus second-best prospect in the draft. So the 49ers must be open to considering almost anything.

“You got to talk about every option because you never know what will happen,” 49ers coach Kyle Shanahan said. “You got to be ready for anything somebody will call you on, whether it’s a trade or not. So you got to go through those because they can happen quickly, especially when you get closer to draft day.

“Right now, it’s not necessarily in my mind the No. 2 pick. It’s taking the time to understand the whole pool of people. Who’s going to be available at two? Who’s going to be available halfway through the first round? What are the players you can get in the second and third round? That’s not something that just gets done. You have to watch a lot of tape. You got to listen to your scouts and all the homework they’ve done with the character on these guys and soak it all in for a couple of months.”

Shanahan was on hand Thursday for Stanford’s pro day, during which defensive lineman Solomon Thomas worked out. Thomas is considered a strong candidate to be the No. 2 player off the board.

But does Thomas fit with the 49ers? Under former general manager Trent Baalke, the 49ers invested their top draft picks in Arik Armstead and DeForest Buckner in back-to-back years. Would the 49ers consider spending their top pick on another defensive lineman?

“It really doesn’t concern me what we’ve done in the past or what we’re going to do in the future,” Shanahan said. “It’s what we have now. If we think that player can help us and improve us, then that’s what we’ll do. You want to get the best guy possible. There are lots of options open.”

As the 49ers transition to a four-man defensive line, the team is in need or a pass-rusher. Ahmad Brooks tied with Buckner for the team-lead last season with six sacks. In 2015, Brooks and Aaron Lynch tied for tops on the 49ers with 6.5 sacks.

Brooks, 33, enters his 12th NFL season. Shanahan said he believes Thomas (6 foot 3, 273 pounds) is versatile enough to be a pass-rush threat at defensive end in the 49ers’ new scheme.

“I believe so,” Shanahan said. “I believe he can probably line up anywhere he wants. (But I’m) still not done with my research, yet.”

Thomas won the 2017 Morris Trophy, as the Pac-12’s top defensive lineman, as voted on by the conference’s offensive linemen.