How does Tebow balance life, football?

575274.jpg

How does Tebow balance life, football?

From Comcast SportsNet
ENGLEWOOD, Colo. (AP) -- There's a quarterback Tim Tebow can't wait to meet while in Buffalo for a pivotal late-season game. A special guest showing up at his request. And no, it's not former Bills star Jim Kelly. Tebow is bringing in Jacob Rainey, a highly touted prep player from a private school in Virginia who had part of his right leg amputated after a severe knee injury during a fall scrimmage. Tebow is looking forward to chatting with Rainey before and again after the Denver Broncos' game against the Bills on Saturday. For as dedicated as Tebow is about improving on the field, he's just as devoted to his engagements off it. That's why losses really don't linger. He's already turned the page after the Broncos' 41-23 home loss to Tom Brady and the New England Patriots on Sunday. "I'll move on and continue to be positive and everything," Tebow said Tuesday. As if he knows any other way. Tebow has become the center of the football universe since guiding the Broncos (8-6) from the brink of playoff extinction back into contention. Denver leads the AFC West by a game over Oakland and San Diego after rebounding from a 1-4 start under Kyle Orton. The Broncos are in prime position to make the playoffs for the first time since the 2005 season. Tebow's name and image have been popping up all over as he's appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated, been mentioned at the Republican debate in Iowa and spoofed during a "Saturday Night Live" skit in which the show playfully mocks his faith. Although Tebow hasn't seen the clip yet, his teammates have watched it. "I've heard some players have been laughing about it a little bit," Tebow said. Tebow doesn't mind all the attention. It gives him a platform for his causes, such as the Tim Tebow Foundation's "Wish 15" program. On Sunday, he brought in Kelly Faughnan, who is dealing with tumors and seizures. "It gives her an opportunity to have a good time and gives her a little hope and puts a smile on her face," Tebow said. "Ultimately, that's what's important. As hard as it is to say it, that's more important than even winning or losing the game." With every passing game, Tebow steadily improves in the passing department. Sure, his mechanics are still rough and his style unorthodox. But he's making far better reads and decisions than he was several weeks ago. "He's not afraid, no stranger to hard work," coach John Fox said. "He works as hard as any player I've ever coached." Tebow even received quite a backing from the boss himself, John Elway, who gave his strongest indication yet in an interview with The Associated Press that he believes Tebow can transform from a scrambling quarterback into a pocket passer. That meant a lot to the young quarterback. "Mr. Elway is obviously one of the best to ever play the game. To get any compliment from him is extremely nice," said Tebow, 5-0 on the road since taking over the starting job. "He's been around this game a long time. That's nice to hear." Bills coach Chan Gailey applauds Denver's bold choice of switching to the unconventional option offense to better fit Tebow's unique skill set. Gailey always believed that approach could be successful -- for a short window anyway. "I thought the first team that had guts enough to try it, it was going to work for about two years," Gailey said. "Then, defensive coaches in the NFL would catch up to it a little bit. Then, it would be a struggle." Tebow has proficiently run this offense, just like he did at Florida, where he won the Heisman and two national titles. He has rushed for 610 yards this season, the most by a Denver quarterback and easily surpassing Elway's best mark (304 yards in 1987). To Gailey, there's just one potential flaw with using the read option -- keeping the quarterback healthy. That's a reason why it really hasn't been tried to the extent it has until now. But Tebow's built to deliver a few wallops, too. "It's a long season. You take a lot of hits. You take a lot of hits when you're not running option football," Gailey said. "Can the guy make (it through) the season? That's the key. But he's the ultimate wildcat kind of guy. He can run it and he can throw it from the quarterback position. He creates a big problem for defenses." The biggest challenge remains keeping him in the pocket. Allowing Tebow to escape presents all sorts of headaches. Because that's what makes Tebow so explosive, when he's able to make things happen with his feet. "The last time I judged quarterbacks, which has been every day of my life it seems like, you're judged by winning football games," Gailey said. "That's what he does. He wins football games. It's probably not in the fashion that everyone in the NFL is used to, but he's leading his team to victory and that's an important factor for playing the quarterback position." Winning isn't everything to Tebow. His faith and foundation are just as high of priorities, too. Tebow's foundation is teaming up with CURE International to build a children's hospital in the Philippines, where Tebow was born. He also inspires inmates through jailhouse talks. "Ultimately, that's taking my platform and using it for something good, more so than any SNL' skit or any magazine," Tebow said. As for what he wanted for the holidays, Tebow didn't hesitate. "To use my platform for good," he said, "and to beat the Bills."

Giants put it together in all phases, get back in win column

Giants put it together in all phases, get back in win column

SAN FRANCISCO — In the bottom of the eighth inning Monday, with the Giants finally running away with one, Johnny Cueto started blowing into a giant wad of bubble gum. He held two hands out, ready to catch remnants of an explosion as Brandon Crawford and Kelby Tomlinson looked on and smiled. 

A few minutes later, players started migrating to the dugout rail as they have done in each of the three starts Ryder Jones has made. They are ready to cheer on a rookie’s first big league hit, even if the wait has been an excruciating one for the third baseman. 

Bruce Bochy likes to say that your personality is better when you’re winning, and his players certainly showed that Monday in snapshots here and there. They woke up to a report that there were fractured in the clubhouse, caused in large part by the new closer. They denied it, they met as a group, and then, finally, they won. 

Jeff Samardzija pitched as he has for two months, the top of the lineup came through over and over again, and Brandon Crawford paced a golden night with the gloves. A 9-2 win over the Rockies was just the second since June 11 and it snapped a nine-game losing streak against the Rockies. Any win is meaningful at this point, but this one seemed to mean just a little bit more given the drama of the day. 

“Despite what people might think, we still have a pretty good group here and we get along just fine,” Crawford said. “We’re all rooting for each other.”

It’s one thing to support teammates off the field, and there’s been no indication that the Giants aren’t doing that. It’s quite another to be hand-in-hand between the lines, and for much of this season, Samardzija has been on an island. 

The right-hander has been Bochy’s best pitcher since Madison Bumgarner went down in the hills outside Denver. But he entered Monday with a 2-9 record and 4.74 ERA inflated by faulty defense. He hasn’t grumbled, but he has grown accustomed to the worst, and when Nolan Arenado bounced a ball deep to the hole in shortstop with two on and two outs in the third, Samardzija figured the game was probably tied. 

“I’m thinking maybe they charge it in the outfield and maybe make a play at home,” Samardzija said. “But with a guy like that at shortstop, things change so fast.”

Crawford scooped the ball on the edge of the grass. He would have liked nothing more than to make an otherworldly throw to first to nail his World Baseball Classic teammate, but he knew the best chance was at third. A couple of days ago, Crawford and Jones discussed how the rookie should cover third on such a play. Jones played it perfectly, retreating in time to catch Crawford’s inning-ending throw. 

“The best thing (about Crawford) is he doesn’t even talk about it,” Samardzija said.

No, Crawford put the spotlight on Jones.

“That’s a pretty heads-up play,” he said. “We talked about it and he was there. It was a funny coincidence.”

The play held the lead, and the Giants kept pushing. The top four hitters in the lineup finished with 10 hits, six RBI and six runs. Brandon Belt had an RBI triple in the five-spot. Crawford drove in a run behind him. Gorkys Hernandez and Kelby Tomlinson added insurance from the bottom. Bochy watched it all from the top step and saw a group collectively relax.

“Just quit fighting it so much,” he said. “There’s a lot of talent in this offense. There’s no reason they can’t put consistent runs on the board. Tonight I just thought the at-bats were so much better and the focus was. Once it started rolling, guys felt better about themselves, and it just got contagious.”

Instant Analysis: Five takeaways from Giants' skid-snapping win over Rockies

posey-postgame.jpg
AP

Instant Analysis: Five takeaways from Giants' skid-snapping win over Rockies

BOX SCORE

SAN FRANCISCO — On a day that started with controversy, Giants players called a meeting following batting practice. Perhaps they were talking about when and where to stretch. Perhaps a reminder was given to keep clubhouse complaints in the actual clubhouse. 

Or, perhaps, the players just decided that enough was enough. 

In a rare display, the Giants put a clean and complete game together. They beat the Rockies 9-2 at AT&T Park, getting just their second win since June 11 and snapping a nine-game losing streak to the Rockies. 

Jeff Samardzija continued his hot streak, the lineup was opportunistic and flashed some power, and the defense sparkled at times. Here are five things to know from the throwback night … 

—- Samardzija walked off to a standing ovation after throwing 112 pitches. He was charged with two earned in 6 1/3 innings. Ignore the record and ERA for a second — his FIP is 3.37 and his xFIP is 2.95. He really is having a very good and underrated season. 

—- Here’s another one for your Samardzija file: Over the past two months, he has 82 strikeouts and three walks. 

—- It was a good day in the race for another Brandon Crawford Gold Glove. Adeiny Hechavarria, one of the few in the National League who even approaches Crawford, was traded to the Rays. Crawford added to the reel by gunning a runner down on third and making a nifty spin-and-throw in the fourth to rob Ian Desmond of a hit. 

—- There are nights where Denard Span looks like a game-changer, and this was one of them. He had a single, walk and triple in his first three plate appearances, scoring twice as the Giants built a 5-0 lead. He was spry in center, too 

—- Nolan Arenado was 0 for 4. Apparently that’s legal now. (It was actually his ninth 0 for 4 or worse against the Giants, in 81 games.)

—- Bonus sixth fact since the Giants won a game: Sam Dyson, acquired basically for free, is the new setup man. That didn’t take long, and it probably won’t be changing anytime soon. Dyson gave up a single but struck out the other three batters he faced.