Jury selection under way in Bonds trial

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Jury selection under way in Bonds trial

March 21, 2011Editor's note: Comcast SportsNet Bay Area's Kate Longworth is in the courtroom and we will update this story with her dispatches throughout the day. Follow her Twitter updates here.

SAN FRANCISCO (APCSN) -- Some loved Barry Bonds so much they can't be impartial. Others already believe he's guilty. A mother worried about the effect sports doping would have on her impressionable children. And so the laborious process of selecting a jury began Monday in the criminal case of USA v. Bonds.

More than three years after the all-time home run leader was charged with lying to a grand jury when he denied knowingly using performance-enhancing drugs, his trial got under way in San Francisco federal court. The judge and lawyers were attempting to winnow about 100 prospective jurors into 12 jurors and four alternates for a case that could take up to four weeks.

Bonds was present in a dark suit, with roughly six family membersfriends sitting in the front rows of court.

According to firsthand accounts from inside the courtroom, jury selection began at about 9:40 a.m. with the arrival of the 38-person (22 female, 16 male) panel. U.S. District Judge Susan Illston asked basic questions such as where jurors lived, their occupation, a brief family description, their hobbies, had they served on a jury before, among other inquiries.

A handful of jurors mentioned baseball and sports as hobby. One indicated a reluctance to render a judgment against "a great athlete like Mr. Bonds. It might cloud my judgment."

"It's hard to make decisions about other people's lives," juror No. 9 told U.S. District Illston when asked if he could be impartial.

"It's the hardest thing we do," replied the judge, who has sealed the prospective jurors' names until after the trial concludes.

"I haven't done too good with (my life)," juror No. 9 concluded before sitting back down. He remained eligible for the jury, but 42 other people in the pool were dismissed from the case before the questioning began Monday.

Illston excused one juror because of a death in a family. A second person was dismissed because of his allegiance to the San Francisco Giants.

"I'm a Barry Bonds fan and I'm a huge SF Giants fan. It's my life. I don't know if I could judge Mr. Bonds after providing me with so much entertainment. It's an intimate relationship," prospective juror No. 22 wrote on a questionnaire he filled out on Thursday. "I don't think I could find him guilty."

No. 22 identified himself as age 35 and working at Target as an "in-stock team member."

After lunch the prosecution began its questioning of potential jurors. Among the questions was about how many Giants fans were present. About six hands were raised. The follow-up: Does anyone feel that the Giants are on trial? No hands went up.

Illston also granted the request of both sides to dismiss 38 prospective jurors with perceived biases.

"My opinion is that steroids is ok to be used since these are the jobs of athletes," prospective juror No. 29 stated in is questionnaire before being dismissed. "If a player must advance in hisher jobs, supplements should be able to be used."

Illston said she expects to have just enough people to fill the jury. Most of those who remained told the judge they could stay impartial, though several with strong impressions of the case still remained in the jury pool, taking direct questions from the judge

"I would be reluctant to render a judgment against a great athlete like Bonds," juror No. 24, a single, 61-year-old man living on disability payments, told Illston. "It would color my judgment."

The judge thanked the man for his time, and he sat down to await a decision on whether he would remain on the jury.

One of the prospective jurors whom prosecutors want excused wrote on her questionnaire: "He is guilty. He lied. He has suffered enuf. There should have been some sort of settlement." The prospective juror identified herself as 61 years old and holding a law degree.

Another juror identified herself as an administrative assistant with Google Inc.

"Everyone looks up to these athletes, including young kids and its sad they take drugs to do better. What are kids learning?" the 42-year-old wrote on her questionnaire. "I have young impressionable kids and they do sports. I would be distraught if they felt they had to take drugs to do well in any arena."

Bonds, who played for San Francisco when he hit 73 homers in a season and when he broke Hank Aaron's career home-run record, has pleaded not guilty to one count of obstruction and four charges of lying to a grand jury.

When he initially entered his plea in December 2007, he was met by thousands of media, fans and others as television helicopters hovered overhead. Much of that attention was missing on Monday. About a dozen photographers milled outside, but few fans were there to see Bonds walk into the federal courthouse in San Francisco dressed in a dark suit, white shirt and silver tie.

While Bonds sat with his star-studded legal team at the defense table, Jeff Novitzky, the federal agent who led the investigation of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative, joined the prosecutors. Bonds is the biggest name to go to trial from the BALCO probe.

Derek Carr approves of Tiger Woods' new pool table

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AP

Derek Carr approves of Tiger Woods' new pool table

Tiger Woods' re-felted pool table is for all of Raider Nation.

To no surprise, quarterback Derek Carr approves of the new look. 

The golf legend tweeted a picture of his new table where he went with silver felt and a Raiders logo right in the middle. Woods' table also has silver and black balls with the Raiders logo on them. 

Woods grew up in Southern California and attended Stanford in 1994, the Raiders' last year in Los Angeles. That same year, Woods helped the Cardinal become the NCAA Division I golf champions before turning pro.

Yoenis Cespedes: 'I’m going to play the last year of my career with Oakland'

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AP

Yoenis Cespedes: 'I’m going to play the last year of my career with Oakland'

After signing a four-year, $36 million deal with the A's before the 2012 season, Yoenis Cespedes' time in Oakland came to an end halfway through his third season.

The current Mets star certainly hasn't forgetten his time in Oakland, sharing his desire to end his career back where he started it to the San Francisco Chronicle

“I wish that happens,” Cespedes said on Friday with the A's taking on his Mets in New York. “I told (Jerry) Blevins, ‘I don’t know how many years I’m going to play, but I’m going to play the last year of my career with Oakland.’ I don’t know if that’s possible or not, but that’s my goal.”

Cespedes, who has also played in Boston and Detroit, loved his time in Oakland. 

“I still love the A’s, they were the first team to give me an opportunity to play in the big leagues," Cespedes said. “I love Oakland all the time.”

Another key reason for Cespedes' hope to return to the A's one day is how much he enjoyed playing for manager Bob Melvin. 

“I tell my guys here all the time that he’s the best manager for me so far,” Cespedes said. “I don’t think there’s a better manager than Melvin.”

Cespedes hit .262 with 66 home runs in his time with the A's. Over his six-year career, the slugging outfielder owns a career .272 batting average with 146 homers.