Kings' relocation application deadline extended

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Kings' relocation application deadline extended

April 15, 2011KINGS PAGE KINGS VIDEO NEW YORK (AP) The NBA has granted the owners of the Sacramento Kings an extension until May 2 to file paperwork requesting a relocation to Anaheim.Joe and Gavin Maloof were supposed to submit the documents by Monday, but the league's owners decided to delay that after hearing from Anaheim and Sacramento officials during two days of meetings that ended Friday.Commissioner David Stern said the league wanted to "do a little bit more fact finding" after Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson told owners Thursday of additional revenue that had been identified, of the city's commitment to build a new arena, and revealed an interested potential buyer in Pittsburgh Penguins co-owner Ron Burkle."So the committee thought that it would be a good idea to do a little bit more fact-finding and determine how this will ultimately play out," Stern said. "There's no agenda here; just to make sure that something as important to all parties as the transfer of a team to another city and the attempts of that city to keep that team was fully understood, fully briefed."The Maloofs insist they won't sell, and Stern said the sale of the Kings, or another team to Burkle that would be moved to Sacramento if the Kings left, is "not a high priority on our agenda."The relocation committee headed by Oklahoma City owner Clay Bennett, who moved the SuperSonics from Seattle three years ago, will research some of the assertions made by Johnson and the potential for success in Anaheim while competing against the Lakers and Clippers. The panel also will recommend a relocation fee the Maloofs would have to pay should they move.Though eyebrows were raised with Bennett's appointment because of the Sonics' contentious departure to his home state of Oklahoma, Stern said there was no conflict and that Bennett had been chosen because he has been active in the Kings' situation and other league business.
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"Maybe Sacramento will think ... - although I don't - that (Bennett) favors movement. In this case, he favors what's best for the league and the Kings," Stern said during a conference call.Stern said Sacramento's problem was the outdated Power Balance Pavilion, not its market size. Johnson told owners Thursday that the city is committed to building a new entertainment center even if the Kings leave.Stern seemed dubious, noting that the discussion of a new building in Sacramento is "usually an eye-roller" at the league because there's been no progress toward it for years. But Johnson's meeting also included a report from the group conducting the feasibility study for a new arena that should be completed by next month, and it made enough of an impression for the Maloofs and Bennett to recommend the extension."It was just felt that this was a good presentation and we should delve a little bit more to understand what its ramifications are," Stern said.Once the Maloofs do apply, owners would have to approve the move by a majority vote. Stern said the delay would not hinder their ability to play in Anaheim next season, pointing out how quickly the Hornets were transplanted from New Orleans to Oklahoma City following Hurricane Katrina.He wouldn't predict how things would end, but hopes the committee can finish its work in two more weeks."It was sort of like a timeout," Stern said. "This is difficult, let's take some time here to better understand it. This is very important. It's important to the Maloof family. It's important to (Anaheim Ducks owner Henry Samueli) and the people of Anaheim, and it's important to Mayor Johnson and the people of Sacramento. And so the committee wanted to do some work."

In push for playoffs, LA Kings acquire goalie Bishop from Tampa Bay

In push for playoffs, LA Kings acquire goalie Bishop from Tampa Bay

The Los Angeles Kings have acquired goaltender Ben Bishop in a trade with the Tampa Bay Lightning.

Los Angeles sent Peter Budaj, defensive prospect Erik Cernak, a 2017 seventh-round pick and a conditional pick to Tampa Bay for Bishop and a 2017 fifth-round pick.

Lightning general manager Steve Yzerman announced the trade Sunday night, less than four days before the trade deadline.

Bishop, a pending unrestricted free agent, helped the Lightning reach the 2015 Stanley Cup Final. The Kings now have Bishop and 2012 and 2014 Cup winner Jonathan Quick, who returned Saturday from a long-term lower-body injury that had sidelined him since October.

The 6-foot-7 Bishop, 30, is 16-12-3 with a 2.55 goals-against average and .911 save percentage.

Kurt Busch breaks through in 16th try, wins first Daytona 500

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AP

Kurt Busch breaks through in 16th try, wins first Daytona 500

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. -- Kurt Busch had a monster start to the season with a last-lap pass to win the crash-filled Daytona 500.

Busch is sponsored by Monster Energy, which kicked off its first season as the title sponsor for NASCAR's top series Sunday with the season-opener. It wasn't NASCAR finest moment, though, as multiple accidents pared down the field and had a mismatched group of drivers racing for the win at the end.

"The more that becomes unpredictable about Daytona, the more it becomes predictable to predict unpredictability," Busch said. "This car's completely thrashed. There's not a straight panel on it. The strategy today, who knew what to pit when, what segments were what. Everybody's wrecking as soon as we're done with the second segment.

"The more that I've run this race, the more that I just throw caution to the wind, let it rip and just elbows out. That's what we did."

It appeared to be pole-sitter Chase Elliott's race to lose, then he ran out of gas. So did Kyle Larson, Martin Truex Jr. and Paul Menard. As they all slipped off the pace, Busch sailed through for his first career Daytona 500 victory.

It also was the first Daytona 500 win for Stewart-Haas Racing, which is co-owned by Tony Stewart. The three-time champion retired at the end of last season and watched his four cars race from the pits.

"I ran this damn race (17) years and couldn't win it, so finally won it as an owner," Stewart said.

Ryan Blaney finished second in a Ford. AJ Allmendinger was third in a Chevrolet, and Aric Almirola was fourth for Richard Petty Motorsports.

The win was a huge boost for Ford, which lured Stewart-Haas Racing away from Chevrolet this season and celebrated the coup with its second Daytona 500 victory in three years. Joey Logano won in a Ford in 2015.

The first points race of the Monster era was run under a new format that split the 500 miles into three stages. Kyle Busch won the first stage, Kevin Harvick won the second stage and neither was a contender for the win. NASCAR also this year passed a rule that gave teams just five minutes to repair any damage on their cars or they were forced to retire.

But the race was slowed by wreck after wreck after wreck, including a 17-car accident at the start of the final stage that ended the race for seven-time and reigning series champion Jimmie Johnson and Danica Patrick. It was a particularly rough incident for Patrick and her Stewart-Haas Racing team, which had all four of its cars collected in the accident.

"Just seems like that could have been avoided and was uncalled for," Johnson said of the aggressive racing behind him that triggered the accident.