Kings

Garrett Temple -- the Kings' forgotten man

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AP

Garrett Temple -- the Kings' forgotten man

Some NBA players get no respect. When you read about the Sacramento Kings’ summer of change, the focus is on the incoming rookie class and the three veteran additions. When you talk about the shooting guard position, the conversation instantly shifts to Buddy Hield vs. Bogdan Bogdanovic. But when the season starts, Garrett Temple will be a veteran leader and likely the starter at the two.

Temple is used to living his NBA life in relative anonymity. He bounced in and out of the league throughout the early stages of his career and has finally found stability at the ripe age of 31. When he signed a three-year, $24 million deal with Sacramento last summer, he more than doubled his career earnings in his first season on the job.

His numbers don’t jump off the page, but his impact on the game goes far beyond points, rebounds and assists. Temple is the Kings’ best perimeter defender and it’s not even a close contest. Temple has an ability to disrupt the opposing team’s offensive flow with deflections. He can guard the point and both wing positions, which will take pressure off the younger players.   

On the offensive end, Temple rarely makes a mistake, averaging just 0.9 turnovers per game for his career. He can act as a second ball handler and he shot a reliable 37.3 percent from behind the arc last season.

With plenty of scoring options around him, Temple doesn’t demand shots. He is a glue guy who finds a role and fits in with any lineup.

Behind the scenes, Temple established himself as an authentic voice of experience. Vince Carter will carry a lot of weight in the locker room as a former superstar turned aging mentor. Zach Randolph commands respect with his 16 years of grinding through the NBA, and George Hill will take on tutoring the rookie point guards. But at the end of last season, Sacramento’s locker room was all Temple’s.

He was voted the Kings’ teammate of the year and he has built strong bonds with the young core. He’s already spent time this summer with the incoming rookie crop, which only solidifies his spot as a team leader.

Dave Joerger will ask Temple to play both wing positions, but his natural spot on the floor is at the two. Buddy Hield finished the season manning the position, with Temple sliding to the three, but the Kings have more options coming into the 2017-18 campaign.

Bogdanovic adds an interesting wrinkle to the competition. The Serbian sharpshooter is very popular with the Kings front office. At 25, he comes into the league with an advanced offensive game and ready to play.

The Kings are trying to build a winning culture and the competition for playing time will be fierce at almost every spot on the floor. At some point during the season, either Hield or Bogdanovic might force Joerger’s hand. It’s also possible that Joerger will need Temple to shift over and steal minutes at the three.

Regardless of position, expect Temple to play substantial minutes this season. You can also guarantee that he will be one of the strongest voices in a locker room filled with inexperienced players.

Kings miss potential competitive advantage while going floor crazy

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Twitter/@SacramentoKings

Kings miss potential competitive advantage while going floor crazy

Somebody has to warn me when sentences like this appear at random. From a tweet by Paul Lukas of UniWatch:
 
“International outreach: (Sacramento) Kings' new black alternate court includes graphics in Hindi and Mandarin, depending on team's promotional campaign.”
 
Now when did that become up for grabs?
 
Not the Hindi or Mandarin legends below the Kings’ logo, which were announced by the team on NBA.com Thursday. I think every nation that wishes to should feel a part of the Dave Joerger Experience – Mongolia, Kazakhstan, South Sudan, Placerville, you name it.
 
But what I didn’t know is that there is now a desperate marketing need for alternate floors.
 
I mean, you don’t get much more fundamental and frill-free than the ground. You can paint it, you can decal it, you can varnish it, you can stain it, you can scuff it, and it still stays pretty floor-y.
 
And it robs the Kings of a potential competitive advantage that they could desperately use.
 
The Boston Celtics made great use of their old parquet floor at the now spectral Bostonb Garden. There were hot spots and dead spots, seams and gaps that only the Celtics players knew, and they all used them to their benefit throughout the golden age of Celtic basketball.
 
And now that the Celtics are celebrating the Garden’s 20th year of rubblehood, they probably miss that old floor a bit. Even though they pretty much sold off most of the bits for great scads of cash and used others to be included in the current floor.
 
But the Kings need two. No, wait. They need three. Hmmm.
 
Now the Kings also have four different uniforms to go with their floors, meaning that every game prep will include a few minutes to figure what socks go with what grain of wood. This seems like an unproductive use of everybody’s time.
 
As for the languages on the floor . . . well, if I was from Bulgaria, I’d be pretty damned cheesed off right now that I can’t see my team’s name on one of my floors.
 
So I will do it for you. Go You царства на сакрамента!

Report: Kings big man Zach Randolph takes plea, avoids jail time

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AP

Report: Kings big man Zach Randolph takes plea, avoids jail time

Free Z-Bo. According to TMZ.com, Sacramento Kings big man, Zach Randolph, pled no contest to a misdemeanor resisting arrest charge stemming from an arrest during a block party in the Nickerson Garden area of LA on Aug. 9. The 16-year NBA veteran originally faced two felony counts, including marijuana possession with the intent to sell.

Randolph walked out of a courtroom on Aug. 31 with reduced charges, but still faced a pair of misdemeanor counts, including one for drug possession. According TMZ, potential drug charges were dropped in exchange for the no contest plea on Wednesday.

Per the plea agreement, Randolph was sentenced to 150 hours of community service and he must stay out of trouble for the next year. If he holds up his end of the bargain, the resisting arrest conviction will be voided from his permanent record.

Randolph, 36, signed a two-year, $25 million deal with the Kings over the summer after spending the previous eight seasons in Memphis. There is no word yet as to whether the NBA will chime in with a fine or suspension.

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