Kings' arena deal falls through

541396.jpg

Kings' arena deal falls through

The Kings' future in Sacramento is uncertain again.

A tentative deal for a new arena has fallen through, leaving open the possibility the team's owners could again try to move from California's capital.

The Maloof family said Friday it intended to remain in Sacramento, and Commissioner David Stern says he believes them. But Stern also said it was the Maloofs' right to re-examine the deal that had been agreed to last month, and he says there is nothing more the league can do to broker a new one.

It's not going to happen, but I can say the city has stepped up," Stern said. "We have nothing further to give, to cajole, to yell, or all the various ways I've tried to keep the parties on track to get what we thought was a win win in Sacramento."

RELATED: Mayor's open letter to Maloof family

Stern stressed that the deal was "always nonbinding," and he supported the Maloofs' decision to say they were no longer comfortable with its terms.

"I think it's fair for the Maloofs to say they don't want to do that," Stern said during a news conference after two days of owners meetings. "If they had done it simpler, earlier or more directly, it could have saved a lot of angst and trouble."

The Kings nearly moved to Anaheim after last season before agreeing to stay this season while the city tried to put together a plan to replace Power Balance Pavilion.

The two sides reached a tentative deal last month to fund the estimated 391 million arena that would open for the 2015-16 season in the downtown Sacramento rail yards. The Sacramento City Council already passed its end of the deal, brokered by the league and tentatively agreed to by the Kings.

Kings owners Joe, Gavin and George Maloof had since taken issue with some of the terms particularly environmental and pre-development costs. Under the agreement, the Kings and arena operator AEG each agreed to pay about 3.25 million in pre-development costs with the city paying the remaining 6.5 million.

The Maloofs made a presentation to owners Thursday, which they shared at a separate news conference Friday. They were meeting later in the day with Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson, leaving Stern "hopeful about its outcome but not optimistic."

During their news conference, the Maloofs said they liked Sacramento but insisted the arena project was too expensive. George Maloof said they had given the city a list of their concerns that needed to be addressed before they could commit to such a major deal.

Maloof even floated the idea of renovating Power Balance Pavilion. Stern said he didn't know if that was possible.

"If they choose to do that, that's up to them," he said.

The Kings are scheduled to play at Power Balance Pavilion next season. Stern wouldn't speculate where they would play beyond that, and said if they sought to relocate, approval would be left to the relocation committee that is headed by Oklahoma City owner Clay Bennett.

Cousins buys chocolate from kids for charity, donates bars to flight staff

Cousins buys chocolate from kids for charity, donates bars to flight staff

DeMarcus Cousins leads the NBA in technical fouls. He also leads the league in scowls and he’s even kicked over a few garbage cans following the Kings' loss to the Chicago Bulls on Saturday night. But that’s just a small portion of who he is.

According to a source that travels with the team, Cousins went out of his way Sunday morning to make an impact in the lives of a couple of local youth in Chicago.

Kids were selling chocolate bars outside the team’s hotel trying to earn money for charity. Plenty of people walked by, avoiding the youth, but Cousins stopped, reached into his pocket and purchased all of the boxes they had to sell.

Later on in the day, Cousins donated the candy to the flight service staff for use on the flight to Detroit.

Cousins gets plenty of negative press for his antics on the floor, but off the court, he is extremely generous. He plays Santa-Cuz during the holidays, buying gifts for underprivileged children in Sacramento and his hometown of Mobile, Alabama. He has also purchased a new scoreboard for a local high school and even paid for the funeral of a local high school football player who lost his life in a drive-by shooting.

No one is perfect, Cousins included, but he also has a genuinely good side that he often doesn’t seek or receive press for.

 

NBA: Cousins didn't foul Wade on late missed dunk; Kings center responds

NBA: Cousins didn't foul Wade on late missed dunk; Kings center responds

A day later, the NBA confirmed what most people in the United Center felt.

Kings center DeMarcus Cousins didn't foul Bulls guard Dwyane Wade on a dunk attempt with 12.8 seconds remaining in Saturday night's game, the league announced in its Last Two Minute report on Sunday.

The NBA deemed it an "incorrect call" and issued the following comment:

"Cousins (SAC) has his hand on Wade's (CHI) back while he is airborne, but he does not extend his arm and push him and the contact does not affect the shot attempt."

Shortly after the NBA put out their report, Cousins offered his take on their ruling:

"Yeah thanks the team feels so much better now that it's cleared up!" Cousins wrote on Twitter Sunday afternoon.

During the game on Saturday, Cousins couldn't believe he had been called for a foul. After the game, which the Kings lost 102-99, the team kept the doors to the locker room closed for a lengthy period of time. When the media was finally allowed in, Cousins had calmed down.

"They made the absolute right call. Incredible job by the referee crew tonight. I don't have a complaint in the world. They should get more recognition on how well they ref these games. They don't get the credit they deserve, so kudos to them. I applaud them," Cousins said after the game.