Kings

Singer Leah Tysse explains taking knee during anthem at Kings game

Singer Leah Tysse explains taking knee during anthem at Kings game

Editor's note: There is no audio in the above video clip

Before tipoff of the opening preseason game Monday night at the Kings' new arena, the Golden 1 Center, Bay Area native Leah Tysse took the mic to sing the national anthem. Near the end of her performance, Tysse took a stance as she lowered to the ground. 

With Kings cheerleaders holding onto the American flag behind her, Tysee lowered her head and went to a knee to finish her performace. The act stems from 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick protesting the national anthem for social and racial injustice in America. 

In a statement on her Facebook page, Tysse called her act of taking a knee, "The most patriotic thing I could do." Her full statement can be seen below:

Why I took a knee while singing the Anthem at a Sacramento Kings NBA game: This act embodies the conflict many of us feel. I love and honor my country as deeply as anyone yet it is my responsibility as an American to speak up against injustice as it affects my fellow Americans. I have sung the anthem before but this time taking a knee felt like the most patriotic thing I could do. I cannot idly stand by as black people are unlawfully profiled, harassed and killed by our law enforcement over and over and without a drop of accountability. I believe that the majority of police are good and are against this too and as a nation we all need to speak up. We should all be outraged and demand justice and an end to the brutality. Let’s look around our communities for those facilitating healthy interactions between law enforcement and communities of color and support. The sad reality is, as a white American I am bestowed a certain privilege in this nation that is not enjoyed by all people. Black families are having much different conversations with their children about how to interact with the police than white families. Let's be honest. Until we can recognize that white privilege exists we cannot have a dialogue about race. Whether or not you can see if from your vantage point, there is a deep system of institutionalized racism in America, from everyday discrimination to disproportionate incarceration of people of color to people losing their lives at the hands of the police simply for being black. This is not who we claim to be as a nation. It is wrong and I won't stand for it. #solidarity #pleasevote

The Kings opened up their new arena with a 153-96 victory over Maccabi Haifa of Israel.

There's a new Kings' No. 15 in town; Sacramento settles on uniform numbers

There's a new Kings' No. 15 in town; Sacramento settles on uniform numbers

The change from Adidas to Nike isn’t the only switch going on with the Sacramento Kings uniforms this season. Plenty of new faces have joined the roster and the influx of veteran talent has forced some players to make a change in number.

Vince Carter has sported the No. 15 dating back to his time at North Carolina. He’s also worn the number in stops in Toronto, New Jersey, Orlando, Phoenix and Memphis, with the only exception coming during his time Dallas, where he had to wear 25 because the Mavericks had retired Brad Davis’ No. 15.

Carter will wear No. 15 in Sacramento, displacing rookie Frank Mason III. Counting Mason, Carter is the 27th Kings player to wear 15, including DeMarcus Cousins, who wore the number from 2011-2017.

Mason will swap to No. 10, bringing back memories of former point guard Mike Bibby. It’s the 26th time the No. 10 has been worn by a Kings player, including legends Jack Twyman and Nate “Tiny” Archibald. Ty Lawson wore No. 10 last season in Sacramento.

George Hill will wear No. 3 this season with Sacramento, like he has in his previous stops in San Antonio, Indiana and Utah. The addition of Hill forces a change for second-year big man Skal Labissiere, who swapped to No. 7 for the upcoming season.

Hill becomes the 21st player in franchise history to wear the No. 3, joining the likes of Randy Brown, Vernon Maxwell, Gerald Wallace and Shareef Abdur-Rahim. Labissiere is the 15th Kings player to don the No. 7, including Danny Ainge, Bobby Hurley, Jimmer Fredette and Darren Collison from last season.

Bogdan Bogdanovic has worn both 7 and 13 in his time in Europe. But with Labissiere swapping to 7 and Georgios Papagiannis wearing the No. 13, he’ll give No. 8 a shot in Sacramento. Only eight past Kings have chosen No. 8, including Eddie Johnson and more recently Rudy Gay.

Malachi Richardson chose to wear No. 5 last season, but with the departure of Ben McLemore, he was able to snare No. 23 for the upcoming season. Richardson is the 17th player to ask and receive permission to wear 23. The number holds a special place in Kings’ fans hearts from the five year stretch the power forward Wayman Tisdale wore it. Kevin Martin made No. 23 look good from 2005-2010, as well.

Lastly, veteran big man Zach Randolph will wear his standard No. 50. It’s the same number he’s worn in stops in Portland, New York, Los Angeles (Clipper) and Memphis over his 16 year NBA career. He’s only the seventh player to sport 50 in Kings history, including Ralph Sampson and Eddie House.

Report: Kings meeting with former Magic, Warriors exec

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AP

Report: Kings meeting with former Magic, Warriors exec

In their search for Scott Perry's replacement, the Kings have spoken with the former GM of the Orlando Magic.

Otis Smith, who served as the Magic GM from 2006 to 2012, reportedly met with the Kings about their recently-vacated VP of basketball operations job.

News of the meeting for was first reported by ESPN.

Perry left the Kings this month to become the GM of the Knicks.

Smith has ties to Northern California. As a player, Smith's rights were sold by the Nuggets to the Warriors in 1987. He played in 137 games over two seasons with the Warriors.

After his playing days were over, Smith joined the Warriors' front office as the executive director of basketball operations.

Currently, Smith is the director of player development and an assistant coach for the Detroit Pistons.