Ladouceur at the helm of all-time great program

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Ladouceur at the helm of all-time great program

In his 4th decade of leading De La Salle Football, coach Bob Ladouceur has built more than a perennial champion…  

…more than a program that became a national brand after winning a record 151 games in a row…  

…more than a team currently holding a 235 game northern California win streak…  

…To hear senior receiver Andrew Buckley tell it, Bob Ladouceur has built men.  “He cares about trying to turn us into men,” Buckley said “so we can accomplish more things when we get older.”

Coach Ladouceur thinks his current band of Spartans has what it takes to accomplish a 4th straight Bowl Open Title.  But, he’s not yet sure.  

“To go all the way, and win out all the way,” Ladouceur said “It’s a hard road, and you’ve got to be pretty tough to do it.  We’ll see how tough these guys are.”  

Unlike all of the other storied postseason runs by Ladouceur’s Spartans, there’s a different element added to the mix this year.  Ladouceur—the leader of this program since 1979—has been throwing around the “R” word—as in “retirement.”  “I don’t want to lose any coaches we have here who would want to try and do this job,” Ladouceur said. “And, it’s time for them to try it too.  That’s more important to me than anything.  I’ve spent my life working in this and building this program...and helping build this program where it is...and I want to see it continue and get better when I’m not doing it.” 

As to the question of if Ladouceur is more likely to hang up his whistle this year than next, he added “I’m not sure yet.  I mean…one or the other.  I’m just going to see how I feel…and—you know—after I get out of the season for a few weeks or maybe a month or so and see how I feel about it.”

His players, like USC-bound linebacker Michael Hutchings, have heard the rumors about their coach.  “We haven’t even talked about it as a team,” Hutchings said.  “I’m sure after the season, it will be something that’s a little bit bigger amongst us and amongst the guys.  But right now, we’ve just got to focus on our season.”

Bob Ladouceur has spent his life focusing on the high school game—rebuffing offers to coach at higher levels of football.  He says he has no regrets.

“I’ve been happy,” Ladouceur exclaimed.  “If I had it to do all over again, I wouldn’t change one thing.”

Durant questionable for Monday's game in Philadelphia

Durant questionable for Monday's game in Philadelphia

Kevin Durant's status for Monday's game in Philadelphia remains up in the air.

The Warriors forward, who missed his first game of the season on Saturday, is listed as questionable for the team's game against the 76ers.

Prior to the game against the Nets, head coach Steve Kerr told the media that Durant's left hand was "still a little swollen" and called the injury a "day-to-day" thing.

Without Durant, the Warriors still managed to cruise to a 112-95 win over Brooklyn.

Durant injured his left pinky in the opening minutes against the Clippers on Thursday. He remained in the game, but late in the first quarter, he retreated to the locker room with a member of the training staff.

He returned to the game after X-rays came back negative. He played 34 minutes and finished with 25 points, 15 rebounds and seven assists.

 

Three takeaways: Sharks stand up for Karlsson; avoiding the mumps

Three takeaways: Sharks stand up for Karlsson; avoiding the mumps

VANCOUVER – It was a successful first game coming out of the bye week for the Sharks, as they won going away against the Canucks at Rogers Arena on Saturday, 4-1. Here are our three takeaways from the evening in British Columbia…

1 – Slow start, strong finish

The league-wide trend of starting slow coming out of the NHL’s newly instituted bye week was on display in the first period, as the Sharks and Canucks played one of the uglier frames of NHL hockey you’ll ever see. San Jose was on its heels early, surrendering the first six shots of the game and looking particularly confused. They didn’t register a single hit in the period, either, which is hard to do.

The Sharks were lucky that Vancouver wasn’t much better, and that Martin Jones – whose performance we focused on in primary the game recap – was looking sharp and well rested.

The message after the scoreless first period, according to coach Pete DeBoer, was just to “try and get better.” That’s what happened.

“We knew it would be a little messy, and it was,” DeBoer said. “Jonesy thankfully was our best player, and gave us a chance to get our legs under us. I thought as the game wore on we got better and better. It wasn’t a pretty win, by any means.”

Chris Tierney said: “After the first 10 minutes [we] started to feel good and then kind of felt back to normal in the second there. It definitely took a little bit. Joner bailed us out in the beginning a couple times. I thought we started to get going in the second and third.”

2 – Standing up for Karlsson

Melker Karlsson was lucky to return in the third period after he took a heavy hit from Joseph Labate. Karlsson had to be helped to the dressing room after the blow, when his head violently snapped back as Labate ran him into the boards in front of the bench.

Micheal Haley pounced on Labate immediately after the incident, earning a two-minute minor that the team was probably happy to kill off. Labate, to his credit, answered the bell in the third period when he was challenged by and fought Brenden Dillon. The Sharks will face the Canucks three more times this season, including on Thursday, so a response to the hit was particularly necessary even if it was clean.

“That sends a good message to the team that everybody has each other’s back,” Mikkel Boedker said of Haley and Dillon’s efforts. “Those guys are real standup guys, and they’ve done it so many times. Every time they do it, it means something special to all of us.”

DeBoer said: “That’s a huge part of our team and our team identity. We’ve got a group that you’re not going to be able to push to of games, and I think we’ve shown that over the last two years here. You don’t even have to say anything, that’s just automatic.”

3 – Avoiding the mumps

Some eyebrows were raised in the press box midway through the game when the Canucks tweeted that defenseman Luca Sbisa would not return with the stomach flu. That’s one of the early warning signs of the mumps, meaning Sbisa could have exposed some Sharks to the virus, which is making its way through the Vancouver dressing room.

“What are you going to do? We’ve just got to cross our fingers and get outta here and hope that he didn’t rub up against anybody,” DeBoer said.

The Sharks coach said after the game that he thought “most of our guys” have had vaccinations, but “I believe there’s a couple that haven’t.”

After the virus invaded several NHL dressing rooms two seasons ago, the Sharks’ training staff will likely be on the lookout for symptoms when the team reconvenes on Monday. Hopefully, the outbreak will begin and end in Vancouver this time.

“Definitely, you want to make sure that you stay away from all that stuff,” Boedker said.