Local stars shine in S.F. Regional Golden Gloves

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Local stars shine in S.F. Regional Golden Gloves

March 13, 2011Ryan MaquianaCSNBayArea.com

Olympic hopefuls from Sacramento all the way to Bakersfield descended on downtown San Francisco Saturday afternoon to compete in the 2011 Regional Golden Gloves finals. The winners advanced to the California state finals on April 2 in Vacaville, where if they can emerge victorious, they move on to the National Golden Gloves in Indianapolis on April 25. The ultimate champion of each weight class earns one of the eight coveted spots for next years Olympic Trials.The fight of the night featured reigning national lightweight champion Jose Ramirez of Avenal taking a judges decision over former Philippine national team member Adam Fiel of Vacaville in the 132-pound final. While four judges ruled in favor of Ramirez and only one for Fiel, the outcome was much closer than the scorecards would indicate. In fact, Ramirez weathered a third-round knockdown from a Fiel left hook and edged his foe in a hotly contested exhibition of offensive firepower and accuracy from both fighters.It was my first fight since last September so I was a little sloppy, said Ramirez, a freshman at Fresno State. He was a tough fighter but I fought a smart fight and won in the end.I thought I did enough to win, but it happens in an amateur fight, said Fiel. Im going to fight at U.S. Nationals and Im sure Ill see him again in a couple of months. 2009 nationally ranked light welterweight Andy Vences of San Jose overcame the rough-and-tumble tactics of Tulares Vicente Guzman in the 141-pound final in a 5-0 victory that was also more competitive than one would believe after inspecting the cards. Vences, a student at San Jose City College, trailed his opponent early in the bout. However, midway through, he was able to time Guzmans barrages and pivot his way out of trouble, landing enough salvos of his own en route to the triumph. Once I started turning him around, I was able to land six clean shots at a time, said Vences. I got another fight next weekendand that should tune me up for state finals.In the 178-pound final, light heavyweight Ruben Mendoza of Tulare defeated Darrell Taylor of Sacramento by a 5-0 decision. Mendoza was the more consistent aggressor even though Taylor, a Mt. Eden High School of Hayward product, had his moments with some precise counterpunching of his own.Featherweight Edwin Sandoval of Bakersfield scored a 4-1 decision win over fellow 123-pounder Mario Cardenas of Fairfield. Sandovals combination punching in close quarters served as the margin of victory.Concords Daniel Thomas annexed the welterweight title by earning a dominant 5-0 decision over Jesus Sanchez of Madera in a battle of 152-pounders. Thomas utilized his superior height and reach to keep Sanchez at bay throughout the bout.At the 201-pound heavyweight limit, Antwon Abron of Stockton outhustled Clinton Nelson of San Carlos in a brawl of a bout that the judges scored 5-0. When the two decided to trade blows, Abrons harder and cleaner shots were the difference. To close the night, super heavyweight Laron Mitchell of San Francisco took a 5-0 judges tally over Bakersfields Patrick Schwenke in a display of raw aggression. Despite being the shorter fighter, the southpaw Mitchell pressed forward and was able to bully his opponent into the corner repeatedly. Sacramento flyweight Rodolfo Becerril (114 lbs.) and middleweight Ricardo Pinell of Sacramento (165 lbs.) were unopposed and will proceed to the next round as walkovers.

Instant Replay: Warriors overcome poor shooting, hold off 76ers

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AP

Instant Replay: Warriors overcome poor shooting, hold off 76ers

BOX SCORE

Despite struggling from 3-point distance for most of game, the Warriors managed to grind out a 119-108 victory over the 76ers Monday at Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia.

All five starters scored in double figures, with Kevin Durant putting in a game-high 27 points to lead the way. Klay Thompson had 21 points, Stephen Curry 19, Zaza Pachulia 16 and Draymond Green 14.

Curry had the toughest night of all, shooting 7-of-23 from the field -- and 0-of-11 from deep, the worst such performance of his career. The Warriors as a team were 6-of-29 from deep.

The Warriors (50-9) shot 44.9 percent overall, only the third time this season they’ve been below 45 percent in back-to-back games. They shot 42.0 percent in beating Brooklyn last Saturday night.

Six players scored in double figures for the 76ers (22-37), with forward Dario Saric totaling a team-high 21 points.

STANDOUT PERFORMER:
Green and Pachulia share the honors, with Pachulia becoming an offensive force and Green being such a dynamo that even his turnovers couldn’t negate his positive impact.

Green’s line: 14 points (5-of-10 from the field, 1-of-3 from deep, 3-of-6 from the line), 11 assists, six rebounds and five steals. He played 37 minutes and finished plus-22.

Pachulia’s line: 16 points (5-of-5 from the field, 6-of-7 from the line), five rebounds, two assists, one block and one steal. He played 19 minutes and finished plus-1.

TURNING POINT:
After a Robert Covington 3-point pulled Philadelphia within three, 59-56, with 11:19 left in the third quarter, the Warriors came back with a 10-0 run -- requiring only 79 seconds -- to go up 69-59 with 10:00 remaining.

The 76ers got no closer than seven over the remainder of the game.

INJURY UPDATE:
Warriors: F Kevin Durant (L hand contusion) was listed as probable and upgraded to available 90 minutes before tipoff. C Damian Jones is on assignment with Santa Cruz of the NBA Development League.

76ers: G Jerryd Bayless (L wrist surgery), C Andrew Bogut (personal), C Joel Embiid (L knee contusion), F Ben Simmons (R foot fracture) and C/F Tiago Splitter (R calf strain) were listed as out.

WHAT’S NEXT:
The Warriors return to action Tuesday, when they visit Verizon Center to face the Washington Wizards. Tipoff is scheduled for 4:05 p.m. Pacific.

2017 spring practice important for Cal, Stanford for different reasons

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AP

2017 spring practice important for Cal, Stanford for different reasons

It’s only February, but this week marks the beginning of the 2017 football season in the Bay Area. Spring practice has arrived.

Most schools now begin “spring” practice in the winter. In the Pac-12, for example, Oregon State began on February 17, Arizona on Feb. 18 and Colorado on Feb. 22. Stanford’s drills start this Tuesday, while Cal’s kick off on March 15.

Schools are limited to a total of 15 sessions, and safety concerns have led the NCAA to strongly recommend that only eight involve full-contact drills. Indeed, if you ask most head coaches what they hope to gain from spring ball, the first thing most of them say is, “I hope no one gets hurt.”

There’s more to it than that, of course. Typically, spring is the time teams look to fill spots lost to graduation, resolve competition for starting spots, move players to new positions, and evaluate redshirts and early-admit freshmen. It also can be a time to find a quarterback and install a new system, which is the case at Cal this spring.

In certain parts of the country, spring practice is a much bigger deal than it is here in the Bay Area. As longtime Texas sports information director Jones Ramsey used to say, “we only have two major sports at Texas—football and spring football.”

In the SEC and Big Ten, huge crowds are commonplace for the spring intra-squad game. Last year for example, Ohio State drew 100,129 fans to its spring game. Alabama, Auburn, Georgia, Penn State and Nebraska routinely draw 75,000 to 90,000. Cal and Stanford are thrilled if 3,000 fans show up.

Perhaps the most significant spring practice in the history of Bay Area football took place in 1968 at Stanford. Head coach John Ralston had been recruited from Utah State in 1963 to turn around a moribund program that had won 14 games in five years, low-lighted by an 0-10 record in 1960.

But Ralston’s run-oriented attack wasn’t producing the kind of results Athletic Director Chuck Taylor had hoped for when he hired him. Taylor, a member of Stanford’s 1941 Rose Bowl championship team that introduced the T-formation to college football, and coach of Stanford’s ‘52 Rose Bowl team that lived and died by the forward pass, made a not-so-gentle suggestion to Ralston after three middling seasons: throw the football.

So Ralston recruited a couple of local quarterbacks who could sling it—Jim Plunkett from San Jose’s James Lick High School and Don Bunce from Woodside—and announced that he would switch to a pro-style passing game for the ’68 season. Spring practice would serve as the test kitchen for Ralston’s new offense.

Back in those days I was a wet-behind-the-ears sports editor of the Stanford Daily. My timing was good, as I was fortunate enough to cover the ’68 spring practice and football season. In the spring game, Plunkett completed 22 of 39 passes for 335 yards and two touchdowns to solidify his hold on the starting job.

That fall, Stanford opened with San Jose State and Plunkett made his debut by throwing for four touchdowns—including three bombs to quarterback-turned-wide receiver Gene Washington—in a 68-20 rout. No one who was in the stadium that day will ever forget it…it was the beginning of a new era in Stanford football and, in many ways, a new era in college football.

Two years later, Plunkett led Stanford to the conference title and an upset win over Ohio State’s team of the decade in the Rose Bowl. He also won the Heisman Trophy over Notre Dame’s Joe (don’t call me THEES-man) Theisman.

Bunce, the forgotten quarterback, backed up Plunkett for two years before red-shirting his senior year (1970) so he’d have the job to himself in 1971. All he did was win another Pac-8 championship and Rose Bowl.

This spring has the potential to be another important milestone for Stanford and Cal with a new coaching staff at one school and major holes to fill at both.

Cal: New coach Justin Wilcox and his team open spring ball on Wednesday, March 15. The Bears will have three open practices—Friday March 24 at 3:30, Saturday, April 8 at 11 a.m., and the spring game on Saturday, April 22, also at 11. The Pac-12 network will televise the spring game and admission is free. Cal’s March 24 practice will be preceded by “Pro Day” (also open to the public) at 10 a.m., when selected graduating players will work out before NFL scouts and coaches.

In addition to installing a new system and introducing a new coaching staff, Wilcox must find a replacement for record-setting quarterback Davis Webb (a key attraction on Pro Day). Wide receiver Chad Hansen, last season’s breakthrough star, returns to make the new QB’s job easier.

Stanford: The Cardinal divides spring practice into two sessions—February 28-March 12 and April 3-15, separated by a three-week break for dead week, finals and spring break. Four practices will be open to the public—Saturday, March 4 at 10 a.m., Sunday, March 12 at 11:45, Saturday, April 8 (time tbd), and the spring game on Saturday, April 15 at 1:00 p.m., which also will be televised on Pac-12 network.

Stanford’s “Pro Timing Day” on Thursday, March 23 is open to the public at 11:15. The main attractions will be running back Christian McCaffrey and defensive lineman Solomon Thomas, both of whom are turning pro after their junior seasons. Unlike McCaffrey, Thomas played in the Sun Bowl and elevated his pro stock with several game-changing plays.

Coach David Shaw has a quality replacement for McCaffrey in junior Bryce Love, who averaged 7.4 yards per carry during the season and broke two long plays in the bowl game. But he will have to replace Thomas, record-setting kicker Conrad Ukropina, and possibly quarterback Keller Chryst, who is rehabbing from knee surgery.

We’ll be back with a roundup after the conclusion of spring ball. In the meantime, let's hope both Cal and Stanford unearth a few nuggets and that no one gets injured.