MLB players have named their Player of the Year

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MLB players have named their Player of the Year

From Comcast SportsNetNEW YORK (AP) -- Miguel Cabrera is waiting for the crown that was presented to him at the World Series to arrive at his home. He'll give it a prominent spot in his office."I'll show it to my friends, my family," the Detroit Tigers third baseman said Monday after adding another honor by beating out Pittsburgh center fielder Andrew McCutchen and Los Angeles Angels rookie Mike Trout for player of the year as voted on by their fellow major leaguers. "I think it's going to be something special for my kids. ... It's going to be a good story for my grandkids."Cabrera, the first Triple Crown winner in the big leagues since 1967, hit .330 with 44 homers and 139 RBIs for the AL champion Tigers. The slugger was given an actual crown by Major League Baseball during the World Series in honor of his achievement.Detroit was swept by San Francisco in the World Series. Cabrera hit .231 with three RBIs and ended the Series by taking a called third strike."It's really disappointing because we didn't want to finish like we finished," he said. "It was very hard to accept how we lost."But winning the Players Choice Award was special because the voters were his big league peers."It makes you feel proud and makes you feel like you've got to work harder, you've got to work to get better," the 29-year-old Cabrera said. "You've got to get better every year."Retiring Atlanta third baseman Chipper Jones was voted Marvin Miller man of the year for excellence on and off the field over finalists Paul Konerko of the Chicago White Sox and Michael Young of Texas in Players Choice voting announced Monday.Other awards went to Cabrera (AL outstanding player), McCutchen (NL outstanding player), Tampa Bay's David Price (AL outstanding pitcher) and New York Mets knuckleballer R.A. Dickey (NL outstanding pitcher). Trout and Cincinnati third baseman Todd Frazier were voted the outstanding rookies, and Adam Dunn of the Chicago White Sox and San Francisco catcher Buster Posey were chosen comeback players of the year.Voting took place in September.

Warriors' minority owner announces new pro SF soccer team, stadium intentions

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Lyndsay Radnedge

Warriors' minority owner announces new pro SF soccer team, stadium intentions

New details are emerging as the soccer boom in the Bay Area continues. 

San Francisco FC, a prospective new Division II soccer team fronted by the co-founder of Zappos.com Nick Swinmurn, announced their intention to build a new 6,000 seat stadium just south of San Francisco International airport. The report, out of San Francisco Chronicle, says SFFC has applied to the United Soccer League and plans to start playing in the spring of 2019, if approved. 

Swinmurn already owns Burlingame Dragons FC -- a Division IV team that plays in the Premier Development League and recently completed its third season. 

SFFC comes at the heels of the San Francisco Deltas' first season. The Deltas, who finished second during the NASL's latest season, played their inaugural season at Kezar Stadium -- with a capacity for 10,000, the Deltas finished eighth (out of eight) in attendance with an average of 4,502 fans per game and a total of 288,132 attendees, this according to numbers accumulated by SoccerStadiumdigest.com

SFFC will face stiff competition in a crowded Bay Area soccer landscape. Along with the Deltas and Dragons, San Francisco FC will have to compete against San Francisco City FC, another PDL team, and or course, the San Jose Earthquakes, who are in the middle of their most successful season since building Avaya Stadium. 

According to the Chronicle, the new stadium would cost SFFC $3 million. The site is located in Burlingame, near its Bayside Park. Swinmurn, and team president Jordan Gardner, are also looking at other sites in San Francisco. 

“Our ambitions are big. But big doesn’t always mean going to the biggest league you can find," Swinmurn told the Chronicle. "It means creating the best soccer experience that appeals to all kinds of fans. You have to assume that bigger is not always better.”

Swinmurn is also a part of the Golden State Warriors minority ownership group and owns several businesses through his entrepreneurial hub, Lucha Ventures. 

The USL has 30 teams now with plans to expands to as many as 42 in the very near future. 

Taking a closer look at Ryan's criticism of Shanahan

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Taking a closer look at Ryan's criticism of Shanahan

There is no shortage of blame to go around for the Atlanta Falcons’ collapse in Super Bowl 51.

The Falcons built a 28-3 lead in the middle of the third quarter and let it slip away, ultimately falling to the New England Patriots, 34-28, in overtime.

Matt Ryan voiced one previously undisclosed factor in the collapse this week in an interview with Pete Prisco of CBS Sports, pointing the finger at the new coach of the 49ers.

Kyle Shanahan has been the focus of a lot of the blame, but critique from the league MVP was a new one.

The Falcons quarterback faulted his former offensive coordinator for taking too much time to relay the play calls. Ryan said he did not have enough time to change any of the plays – presumably checking out of called pass plays to run the ball.

Here’s what Ryan told Prisco:

"Kyle's play calls -- he would take time to get stuff in. As I was getting it, you're looking at the clock and you're talking 16 seconds before it cuts out. You don't have a lot of time to say, 'There's 16 seconds, no, no, no, we're not going to do that. Hey, guys, we're going to line up and run this.' You're talking about breaking the huddle at seven seconds if you do something along the lines.

"With the way Kyle's system was set up, he took more time to call plays and we shift and motion a lot more than we did with (former coordinator) Dirk (Koetter). You couldn't get out of stuff like that. We talk about being the most aggressive team in football. And I'm all for it. But there's also winning time. You're not being aggressive not running it there."

The 49ers can point to mismanagement of the clock for their own Super Bowl heartbreak. The 49ers’ offense had the perfect play call at the perfect time against the Baltimore Ravens late in Super Bowl XLVII.

But with the play clock striking :00, coach Jim Harbaugh was forced to call a timeout from the sideline. A split-second later, the ball was snapped and it appeared the quarterback run would have easily ended up with Colin Kaepernick in the end zone.

Much like after the 49ers’ loss, the Falcons left plenty of room for second-guessing.

Two of Shanahan’s plays calls, which directly led to the collapse, will forever be scrutinized.

The first came with 8:31 remaining in regulation and the Falcons holding a 28-12 lead. On third and 1 from the Atlanta 36, Shanahan did not remain conservative with an expected run play. He swung for the fence.

Receiver Aldrick Robinson, whom the 49ers added this offseason as a free-agent pickup, was breaking free past the Patriots secondary for what could have been a touchdown. But just as Ryan was unloading, New England linebacker Dont’a Hightower hit him and forced the fumble. Running back Devonta Freeman whiffed on blitz pickup, which would have provided Ryan with enough time to target Robinson deep.

Ryan’s explanation does not appear applicable on this play, though. In watching the replay, the Falcons broke the huddle with more than 25 seconds remaining on the play clock and the snap occurred with :15 to spare.

The other questionable sequence came after the Falcons – leading by eight points -- got to the New England 22-yard line with less than five minutes to play. The Falcons lost 1 yard on a run play on first down.

On second down, Ryan was sacked for a 12-yard loss. Before that play, the Falcons broke the huddle with :19 on the play clock. The snap occurred with :04 remaining. The game clock was running, so the Falcons had reason to attempt to burn as much clock as possible.

In the fourth quarter, the Falcons never seemed rushed to get off a play. The closest they came to delay-of-game penalties were when they snapped the ball with :04 on the one play and :03 another time. The majority of their snaps occurred with :10 or more seconds to spare.

If the Falcons were guilty of anything when it came to the play clock, it was that the offense did not waste more time. After New England pulled to within 28-9 late in the third quarter, the Falcons ran only six offensive plays while the game clock was running.

On those six plays, the Falcons snapped the ball with :13, :09, :14, :20, :13 and :04 remaining on the play clock. If they’d snapped the ball with one second remaining each time, they could have shortened the game by 1 minute, 7 seconds. The Patriots scored the game-tying touchdown with :57 remaining in regulation.