Raiders

NBA labor talks hit a major wall

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NBA labor talks hit a major wall

From Comcast SportsNet
NEW YORK (AP) -- Three days and 30 hours' worth of talks couldn't produce a new labor deal, so NBA owners and players walked away without knowing when they will meet again. That's happened a few times during the lockout, but this one felt different. There was a nasty tone, including accusations of lying, and an acknowledgement from Deputy Commissioner Adam Silver that he misjudged just how far apart the sides were. More games seem sure to be canceled, and the entire season could be in jeopardy. "I hate to use the expression gloves are off.' But for all intents and purposes, the gloves are off," players' association vice president Maurice Evans said. "With the press conference that they had -- don't want to get into he said, she said, but that just wasn't very accurate. It's evident of the time we spent in the room that we were here, we were bargaining, we were making progress. For it all to suddenly end -- that should speak volumes in itself." The sides remained divided over two main issues -- the division of revenues and the structure of the salary cap system. The dollars were the obstacle Thursday, after the system caused most recent breakdown. "We understand the ramifications of where we are," Silver said. "We're saddened on behalf of the game." Both sides had said there was progress on minor issues in the first two days in the presence of federal mediator George Cohen, and Silver said he brought more optimism than usual into Thursday's session. "But obviously I was disappointed and sort of maybe overestimated where it turns out we were," Silver said. Without a deal, NBA Commissioner David Stern, who missed Thursday's session with the flu, almost certainly will decide more games must be dropped. The season was supposed to begin Nov. 1, but all games through Nov. 14 -- 100 in total -- already have been scrapped, costing players about 170 million in salaries. Stern said previously that he thought games through Christmas were in jeopardy without a deal this week. Silver said the labor committee would speak with Stern on Friday about the future schedule, though no further cancellations are expected yet. Union officials were upset with Silver and Spurs owner Peter Holt's account of the events and felt owners were never serious about trying to make a deal, with union executive director Billy Hunter saying the lockout was "preordained." "They knew when they presented what they were presenting to us that it wasn't going to fly," Hunter said. The union said owners essentially gave it an ultimatum to accept a 50-50 split of revenues. Attorney Jeffrey Kessler said the meeting was "hijacked." "We were shocked," he said. "We went in there trying to negotiate and they came in and they said you either accept 50-50 or we're done and we won't discuss anything else." Both sides praised Cohen and had honored his request not to speak about the process after the first two days. But it was clear by the time talks broke down that there were bad feelings. "We've spent the last few days making our best effort to try and find a resolution here. Not one that was necessarily a win-win. It wouldn't be a win for us. It wouldn't be a win for them. But one that we felt like would get our game back ... and get our guys back on the court, get our vendors back to work, get the arenas open, get these communities revitalized," union president Derek Fisher said. "And in our opinion, that's not what the NBA and the league is interested in at this point. They're interested in telling you one side of the stories that are not true and this is very serious to us. This is not in any way about ego. There are a lot of people's livelihoods at stake separate from us." Hunter said the union made "concession after concession after concession ... and it's just not enough." "We're not prepared to let them impose a system on us that eliminates guarantees, reduces contract lengths, diminishes all our increases," he said. "We're saying no way. We fought too long and made too many sacrifices to get where we are." Previously each side had proposed receiving 53 percent of basketball-related income after players were guaranteed 57 percent under the previous collective bargaining agreement. Silver said the league formally proposed a 50-50 revenue split Wednesday. The union said its proposal would have been a band that would have allowed it to collect as much as 53 percent but no less than 50, based on the league's revenues. "Hopefully, we can get back to the table, but certainly a tough day, a very tough day," said Holt, the labor relations committee chair. Asked whether the players would drop to 50 percent, Holt said he didn't think it was that big of a jump but that the union did. He said the league would not go above 50 percent "as of today. But never say never on anything." Hunter said Cleveland owner Dan Gilbert told players to trust that if they took the 50-50 split, the salary cap issues could be worked out. Hunter's response? "I can't trust your gut. I got to trust my own gut," he said. "There's no way in the world I'm going to trust your gut on whether or not you're going to be open and amenable to making the changes in the system that we think are necessary and appropriate." Owners and players met with Cohen for 16 hours Tuesday, ending around 2 a.m. Wednesday, then returned just eight hours later and spent another 8 hours in discussions. The sides then met for about five hours Thursday, before calling it quits. "Am I worried about the season, per se? Yeah. But I'm more so worried about us standing up for what we believe in," New Orleans Hornets guard Jarrett Jack said. "I think that's the bigger issue at hand." Cohen didn't recommend that the two sides continue the mediation process as they weren't able to resolve the "strongly held, competing positions that separated them on core issues." Though the sides have said they believe bargaining is the only route to a deal, the process could end up in the courts. Each brought an unfair labor practice charge against the other with the National Labor Relations Board, and the league also filed a federal lawsuit against the union attempting to block it from decertifying. Union officials, so far, have been opposed to decertification, a route the NFL players initially chose during their lockout. However, Hunter said Thursday that "all of our options are on the table. Everything."

Notes: Raiders must turn the page quickly, avoid Washington hangover

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Notes: Raiders must turn the page quickly, avoid Washington hangover

ALAMEDA – Raiders head coach Jack Del Rio gives his players Monday off. Tuesday is generally an in-season rest day, but the Silver and Black get the day after a game to be away from the facility.

“There’s some raw emotion on the day after the game, so I think that helps you maybe teach a little better,” Del Rio said in his Monday press conference. Things need to be taught. That’s one of the biggest benefits to the structure.”

Del Rio called this a "miserable Monday," where his team will be widely criticized for a disatrous 27-10 loss to Washington. 

They’ll spend on more day reviewing it during what Del Rio dubs “Tell the Truth Tuesday." It won't be terribly fun, especially after getting outplayed and outcoached.

It’s a day for corrections, development and one last look back before pouring focus forward the Denver Broncos.

The Washington loss only counts as one. It can become two if that game’s hangover lasts all week. Del Rio is good keeping his players locked on the next task.

He’ll also have to keep them from pressing like they did in Washington.

“We were really looking for that spark, probably pressing early in the game,” Del Rio said. “Offensively, we got out of rhythm. We threw, in the first four drives, two picks and two three-and-outs. We weren’t in rhythm, obviously. They executed. It really wasn’t anything overwhelming. They played some solid, basic coverage and we didn’t execute and they did. It’s just one of those days. It’s an opportunity to learn. Recognize what went wrong.”

Explaining what went awry will be key this Tuesday. There was a lot. Quarterback Derek Carr tried to put the team on his back, to no avail. Carr had a rare dud, and took full responsibility for the loss after the game.

“That’s good for all of us,” Del Rio said. “To me, that’s what we need to do. It starts with me, obviously there are a lot of things that each guy can look at and say ‘this is what I can do better.’ That’s what I want. I want us to reflect inward and see how we can do things ourselves better and then pull together as a team. Stick together, pull together and go forward. That’s what you do.”

Keeping an eye on Crabtree

Receiver Michael Crabtree took a big hit to the chest from Montae Nicholson on Sunday night and did not return to the game. That leaves his availability in some question.

“We’ll take a close look at him and make sure there’s nothing significant going on,” Del Rio said. “I know the doctors cleared for him to travel with us coming back which was good. He took a good shot. It was a clean hit, a good shot. Crab’s a tough guy so I’m sure he’ll bounce back.”

More Marshawn?

Raiders lead running back Marshawn Lynch only touched the ball seven times at Washington. He had six carries for 18 yards and an eight-yard catch. That isn’t enough for this Raiders offense to function well, but Sunday was a unique circumstance. The Raiders fell behind early and couldn’t sustain drives.

“When you have as many three-and-outs and you only take 50 snaps of offense, you can talk about all the things that you left on the drawing board that you would have liked to have gotten to,” Del Rio said. “Certainly, there was a lot of offense that we had designed to get to, including touches for him, but 0-for-11 on third down says all you need to know. When you’re talking about, does your running back get a chance to run it as much as you’d like, when you’re 0-for-11 on third down you’re not going to get a lot of opportunities anywhere with your offense.”

For Draymond Green, protests can't be short-lived: 'We're screwed' if they end soon

For Draymond Green, protests can't be short-lived: 'We're screwed' if they end soon

OAKLAND -- Easing into a seat for an interview a half hour after the Warriors finished practice Monday, Draymond Green responded to the first six questions at decibels barely above a whisper.

There was candor on basketball matters, because there always is with Green, but the power forward’s tone was relatively relaxed.

Not until the next several questions, all related to America’s polarizing sociopolitical climate, did Green’s heart and mind lock into rhythm. Asked if he believes the current wave of protests against inequality will go away soon, his voice picked up volume and conviction.

“I hope not,” Green said. “If it goes away, then we still have a problem. So I hope it’s not going away in a few weeks. Then we’ve missed the message again.

“So, no, I don’t think it’ll be gone away in a few weeks. And I pray that it’s not, because it’s not a problem that can be fixed in a few weeks. So, no, it shouldn’t be gone in a few weeks.”

Green acknowledged that he did not see the demonstrations that were spread across the NFL landscape on Sunday. He was, he said, out shopping and enjoying the day with his children.

He was aware that some teams stayed in the locker room during the anthem, that others knelt on the sidelines and that some linked arms. Being aware was not enough for Green to feel comfortable addressing that aspect.

But he’s very familiar with the subject matter.

“You just have to stand for what you believe in,” Green said during an answer than lasted more than two full minutes. “What everyone else may believe in, you may not believe in.”

Articulating the difference between the life of the athlete and that of a soldier, Green explaining that he has the “utmost respect” for those in the military.

“I just hope that there can be an understanding that this isn’t against the military,” he said. “It’s not to disrespect anything they do. Because I think everyone respects what they do . . . I appreciate everything they do.”

It was evident, however, that Green is on the same page as those pushing for the progress that would make America great, allowing the country to live up to its pledges stated in the constitution and elsewhere.

That’s why he hopes this activism is not a trend but a movement.

“I’m not saying kneeling shouldn’t be gone,” Green said. “But this conversation, trying to make these changes, absolutely not. If it’s gone in a few weeks, we’re screwed.”