Six Bears take stage at NFL combine

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Six Bears take stage at NFL combine

This week, NFL hopefuls will take the field in Indianapolis to prove there mettle amongst some of the best college football players in the nation in the 2012 NFL scouting combine.

RELATED: 2012 NFL scouting combine invitees

The Cal Bears will be represented by their six invitees - Marvin Jones, Mitchell Schwartz, Trevor Guyton, Mychal Kendricks, Sean Cattouse and Bryan Anger.

RELATED: Luck headlines impressive Stanford combine class

Marvin Jones 1Hometown: Fontana, CA
High School: Etiwanda HS
HeightWeight: 6-3202
Position: WR
Age: 21

Marvin Jones put up 2,260 receiving yards during his career at Cal, which puts him 6th among all-time leaders. He is also on the leader boards for 100-yard receiving games, receptions and receiving touchdowns.

In 2011 Jones earned All-American honorable mention honors midseason. He was also a two-time second-team All-Pac 12 selection. He was on the watchlist for the Biletnikoff award for 2 consecutive seasons and the Paul Warfield Award his Senior year. The ESPN.com Pac-12 Blog included Jones on thier All-Underrated team. Cal awarded him with the Cort Majors Captain Award, the Ken Harvey Award for showing special academic commitment and improvement and was also named captain for his Senior year.

Prior to the 2011 season Jones was ranked as the nation's No. 39 draft-eligible wide-receiver. His 2011 performance only helped move him up in this ranking along with his appearance and touchdown catch in the 2012 Senior Bowl.

VIDEO: Marvin Jones at the Senior Bowl

Mitchell Schwartz 72
Hometown: Pacific Palisades, CA
High School: Palisades Charter HS
HeightWeight: 6-6318
Position: OL
Age: 22

Schwartz started every game in his career at Cal between 2008-2011 after red-shirting his 2007 season. He has started at Left and Right Tackleand rounded out his senior season starting every game at Left Tackle. Schwartz stands tall at 6-6, which made him a huge presence for the Bears on the Offensive Line.

He was a first-team All-Pac 12 and Pac-12 All-Academic Selection in 2011, a second-team Pac-10 selection as a Junior and an honorable mention All-Pac 10 selection as a Sophomore. He was named honorable mention Pac 10 All-Academic in 2008, 2009 and 2010. Cal awarded him with the Brick Muller Award as Cal's Most Valuable Offensive Lineman For his 2009, 2010 and 2011 seasons as well as the Cort Majors Captains Award in 2011.

Prior to his 2011 season he was ranked as the nation's No. 24 draft-eligible tackle.
Trevor Guyton 92
Hometown: Woodinville, WA
High School: Redmond HS
HeightWeight: 6-3280
Position: DL
Age: 22

In 2011 Guyton finished as a second-team All-Pac 12 selection. A co-team leader for 4.5 Sacks resulting in a combined loss of 23 yards and 2 forced fumblesfumble recoveries resulting in a combined gain of 19 yards. He leads the defensive linemen with his 42 tackles for the year. These numbers also put him among the leaders in the Pac-12 for tackles and sacks.

He was a preseason candidate in 2011 for both the Ted Hendricks and Bill Willis Awards, which honor the nation's top defensive end and lineman.

Mychal Kendricks 30
Hometown: Fresno, CA
High School: Hoover HS
HeightWeight: 6-0240
Position: LB
Age: 21

The California native played every game in his career at Cal between 2008-2011 and started 2009-2011. In 2011 he led the team in tackles with 106, which put him 5th in the Pac-12 and 76th in the nation. Kendricks also leads Cal interceptions that he has returned for a combined 62 yards and fumbles that he has returned for a combined 33 yards.

In 2011 Kendricks won the most awards of any player at Cal starting with Defensive Player of the Year and first-team All-Conference for the Pac-12. He received second-team, third-team and honorable mention All-American honors. He was on preseason watch lists for the Bednarik Award, Bronko Nagurski Trophy, Butkus Award, College Football Performance Awards Linebacker Trophy, Lott IMPACT Trophy and Rotary Lombardi Award. Cal awarded him with the Bear-Backers Co-MVP Award and Berkeley Breakfast Club Award as the Outstanding Player in the Big Game on the defensive side.

Prior to his 2011 season he was named the nation's No. 9 outside linebacker and No. 30 draft-eligible outside linebacker.

Sean Cattouse 11
Hometown: Chicago, IL
High School: Hubbard HS
HeightWeight: 6-3218
Position: DB
Age: 23

Cattousse leads Cal for interceptions and pass breakups, while ranking third in tackles. His Senior year he picked up two interceptions for 20 yards and 2 fumbles.

He was a candidate for the Jim Thorpe Award and Tatum Award given to the nation's top defensive back in 2011. He picked up honorable mention All-Pac 10 honors his Sophomore and Junior seasons and Cal awarded him with the Stub Allison Award his Sophomore year, which is given to Cal's Most Inspirational Player.

Prior to his 2011 season he was named a third-team All-American, first-team All-Pac 12 selection and listed as the nation's No. 5 draft-eligible safety.

Bryan Anger 19
Hometown: Camarillo, CA
High School: Camarillo HS
HeightWeight: 6-4208
Position: P
Age: 23

Anger started every game possible in his career at Cal. He holds a single-season record for average punt yards and holds this top spot for 3 of the top 6 seasons for Cal punters. He has four of the 12 longest punts in school history, which includes a career-long and fourth All-time at Cal punt of 76 yards. Cal's starting punter was a semifinalist for the Ray Guy Award given annually to the nation's top punter in 2008 and 2010. During his career he was selected as the Pac-10 Special Teams Player of the Week three times.

He is the second player in Cal history after Alex Mack to earn first-team All-Conference honors for three consecutive seasons in 2009, 2010 and 2011. In these three seasons he was also awarded with the J. Scott Duncan Award as Cal's Most Valuable Special Teams Player. Anger was named the College Football Performance Awards' Elite Punter Trophy for his combined performance during the 2010 and 2011 seasons.

Prior to his 2011 season he was named the nation's No. 3 punter and No. 3 draft-eligible punter.

2017 spring practice important for Cal, Stanford for different reasons

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AP

2017 spring practice important for Cal, Stanford for different reasons

It’s only February, but this week marks the beginning of the 2017 football season in the Bay Area. Spring practice has arrived.

Most schools now begin “spring” practice in the winter. In the Pac-12, for example, Oregon State began on February 17, Arizona on Feb. 18 and Colorado on Feb. 22. Stanford’s drills start this Tuesday, while Cal’s kick off on March 15.

Schools are limited to a total of 15 sessions, and safety concerns have led the NCAA to strongly recommend that only eight involve full-contact drills. Indeed, if you ask most head coaches what they hope to gain from spring ball, the first thing most of them say is, “I hope no one gets hurt.”

There’s more to it than that, of course. Typically, spring is the time teams look to fill spots lost to graduation, resolve competition for starting spots, move players to new positions, and evaluate redshirts and early-admit freshmen. It also can be a time to find a quarterback and install a new system, which is the case at Cal this spring.

In certain parts of the country, spring practice is a much bigger deal than it is here in the Bay Area. As longtime Texas sports information director Jones Ramsey used to say, “we only have two major sports at Texas—football and spring football.”

In the SEC and Big Ten, huge crowds are commonplace for the spring intra-squad game. Last year for example, Ohio State drew 100,129 fans to its spring game. Alabama, Auburn, Georgia, Penn State and Nebraska routinely draw 75,000 to 90,000. Cal and Stanford are thrilled if 3,000 fans show up.

Perhaps the most significant spring practice in the history of Bay Area football took place in 1968 at Stanford. Head coach John Ralston had been recruited from Utah State in 1963 to turn around a moribund program that had won 14 games in five years, low-lighted by an 0-10 record in 1960.

But Ralston’s run-oriented attack wasn’t producing the kind of results Athletic Director Chuck Taylor had hoped for when he hired him. Taylor, a member of Stanford’s 1941 Rose Bowl championship team that introduced the T-formation to college football, and coach of Stanford’s ‘52 Rose Bowl team that lived and died by the forward pass, made a not-so-gentle suggestion to Ralston after three middling seasons: throw the football.

So Ralston recruited a couple of local quarterbacks who could sling it—Jim Plunkett from San Jose’s James Lick High School and Don Bunce from Woodside—and announced that he would switch to a pro-style passing game for the ’68 season. Spring practice would serve as the test kitchen for Ralston’s new offense.

Back in those days I was a wet-behind-the-ears sports editor of the Stanford Daily. My timing was good, as I was fortunate enough to cover the ’68 spring practice and football season. In the spring game, Plunkett completed 22 of 39 passes for 335 yards and two touchdowns to solidify his hold on the starting job.

That fall, Stanford opened with San Jose State and Plunkett made his debut by throwing for four touchdowns—including three bombs to quarterback-turned-wide receiver Gene Washington—in a 68-20 rout. No one who was in the stadium that day will ever forget it…it was the beginning of a new era in Stanford football and, in many ways, a new era in college football.

Two years later, Plunkett led Stanford to the conference title and an upset win over Ohio State’s team of the decade in the Rose Bowl. He also won the Heisman Trophy over Notre Dame’s Joe (don’t call me THEES-man) Theisman.

Bunce, the forgotten quarterback, backed up Plunkett for two years before red-shirting his senior year (1970) so he’d have the job to himself in 1971. All he did was win another Pac-8 championship and Rose Bowl.

This spring has the potential to be another important milestone for Stanford and Cal with a new coaching staff at one school and major holes to fill at both.

Cal: New coach Justin Wilcox and his team open spring ball on Wednesday, March 15. The Bears will have three open practices—Friday March 24 at 3:30, Saturday, April 8 at 11 a.m., and the spring game on Saturday, April 22, also at 11. The Pac-12 network will televise the spring game and admission is free. Cal’s March 24 practice will be preceded by “Pro Day” (also open to the public) at 10 a.m., when selected graduating players will work out before NFL scouts and coaches.

In addition to installing a new system and introducing a new coaching staff, Wilcox must find a replacement for record-setting quarterback Davis Webb (a key attraction on Pro Day). Wide receiver Chad Hansen, last season’s breakthrough star, returns to make the new QB’s job easier.

Stanford: The Cardinal divides spring practice into two sessions—February 28-March 12 and April 3-15, separated by a three-week break for dead week, finals and spring break. Four practices will be open to the public—Saturday, March 4 at 10 a.m., Sunday, March 12 at 11:45, Saturday, April 8 (time tbd), and the spring game on Saturday, April 15 at 1:00 p.m., which also will be televised on Pac-12 network.

Stanford’s “Pro Timing Day” on Thursday, March 23 is open to the public at 11:15. The main attractions will be running back Christian McCaffrey and defensive lineman Solomon Thomas, both of whom are turning pro after their junior seasons. Unlike McCaffrey, Thomas played in the Sun Bowl and elevated his pro stock with several game-changing plays.

Coach David Shaw has a quality replacement for McCaffrey in junior Bryce Love, who averaged 7.4 yards per carry during the season and broke two long plays in the bowl game. But he will have to replace Thomas, record-setting kicker Conrad Ukropina, and possibly quarterback Keller Chryst, who is rehabbing from knee surgery.

We’ll be back with a roundup after the conclusion of spring ball. In the meantime, let's hope both Cal and Stanford unearth a few nuggets and that no one gets injured.

No. 20 Saint Mary's holds off Santa Clara in WCC finale

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USATSI

No. 20 Saint Mary's holds off Santa Clara in WCC finale

BOX SCORE

MORAGA — Jock Landale scored 17 points and No. 20 Saint Mary's beat Santa Clara 70-56 on Saturday night in the West Coast Conference regular season finale for both teams.

Emmett Naar and Calvin Hermanson scored 13 points apiece and Dane Pineau added 10 points to help the Gaels (26-3, 15-3) complete a season sweep of the Broncos.

Saint Mary's will get a week off before playing in the WCC tournament as the No. 2 seed in Las Vegas next week.

The Gaels will go in at full strength after suffering a brief scare midway through the second half. Joe Rahon, the team's emotional leader and workhorse in the backcourt, limped off the court with an apparent knee injury and was taken into a tunnel to be examined. He returned to the court a few minutes later wearing tape around his right leg below the knee. He then later got his entire knee wrapped.

Saint Mary's led by as many as 20 in the second half despite coming out of halftime missing six of seven shots with two turnovers.

Landale, as he has much of the season, got the Gaels back on track with a short hook over Henrik Jadersten to start a 10-0 run. Landale later scored on consecutive trips down the floor to push Saint Mary's lead to 66-47.

Jared Brownridge and Matt Hauser scored 15 points apiece for Santa Clara. The Broncos (16-15, 10-8 WCC) lost for only the second time in the last five games.

The Gaels led nearly the entire way.

Saint Mary's came out strong from the perimeter, making five of seven shots beyond the arc in the first half. Naar had two of the 3s and was one of six Gaels players to score as part of an 11-2 run that pushed their lead to 41-29 at halftime.

BIG PICTURE

Santa Clara: Another tough night for the Broncos, who couldn't get much going despite Saint Mary's going through a pair of lulls on offense. Brownridge scored nine of his team's first 11 points, a pattern that played out much of the game. Jadersten gave Santa Clara an early lift with two 3s but picked up three fouls over a span of 1:41 minutes during the first half.

Saint Mary's: With four straight wins the Gaels have regained some of the momentum they lost after falling to No. 1 Gonzaga on Feb. 11 for the second time this season. A third showdown between the conference's two best teams appears likely.

UP NEXT

Santa Clara: The Broncos are the fourth seed for the WCC tournament and will have a bye in the first round.

Saint Mary's: The Gaels also receive a first-round bye and won't play until March 4.