Stanford overwhelms SJSU in opener 57-3

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Stanford overwhelms SJSU in opener 57-3

Sep. 3, 2011BOXSCORE NCAASCOREBOARDSTANFORD PAGE
STANFORD (AP) -- Andrew Luck and the rest of Stanford's players huddled together in the locker room, screaming and shouting every one of the points they piled up in the opener."One, two, three ..." they yelled.Fifty-seven counts later, cheers erupted. For a game that was nothing more than a tune-up, the Cardinal sure made a lot of noise.Luck threw two touchdowns and ran for another score, leading seventh-ranked Stanford past San Jose State 57-3 in the season opener Saturday."It wasn't perfect," new coach David Shaw said. "But it was good."All the way around.
RATTO: Just another day for David Shaw
Luck, the Heisman Trophy runner-up to Auburn's Cam Newton last year, completed 17 of 26 passes for 171 yards and looked every bit the player many believe will take home college football's most famous award. He connected with seven different receivers, showed no signs of slipping under the new staff and rested for the fourth quarter.The standout quarterback summed up his performance in one word: average. Considering what he has done in his career, that would be exactly right.Stanford's right on pace."I think a lot of (the scoring) was our defense and special teams putting us in a position where you can't mess up," said Luck, who presented Shaw the game ball with his teammates. "I definitely don't think we're satisfied on offense."Stepfan Taylor ran for 61 yards and two touchdowns and Chris Owusu caught seven passes for 76 yards for the Cardinal, who pounced on their South Bay rival from the start. San Jose State last upset Stanford in 2006, and the Silicon Valley series has been all Cardinal since.Thanks to Luck.After turning down a chance to be the NFL draft's No. 1 pick, Luck returned to The Farm and has hopes of a Pac-12 title and possible even a national championship. There certainly wasn't any hangover in Stanford's first tune-up.Shaw was calm and cool on the sideline with none of the chest bumping or helmet smacking that personified his predecessor, Jim Harbaugh, now with the San Francisco 49ers. With Luck back and better than ever, there was no reason to get all riled up in this one.Except for maybe watching Luck run all over the field.After driving the ball inches short of the goal line in the first quarter, Luck scrambled to his right, paused and sprinted to the corner. He launched his body toward the sideline and reached the ball out to swipe the pylon, giving Stanford a 10-0 lead on his first touchdown of the season."He gets to dive head first when there's a touchdown involved," Shaw said. "Besides that, he's supposed to slide. He's under strict directives to slide."As if the Cardinal needed any breaks, San Jose State gave them plenty.The Spartans fumbled six times and lost three of them, including when Brandon Rutley entered at quarterback in a wildcat formation only to drop the ball on the exchange. Ben Gardner recovered, and Stanford took over from 13 yards out.The short field position was far too easy for Luck and perhaps the biggest reason his statistics were relatively low.On the first play after the turnover, he sailed a touch pass to tight end Zach Ertz in the corner of the end zone to put the Cardinal ahead 17-0. And the rout was on.Not all of Stanford's highlights came on offense.With the clock dwindling down in the first half, Chase Thomas jarred the ball loose from Matt Faulkner - who was making his first start at quarterback for San Jose State - and Henry Anderson scooped it up and ran 37 yards until he was tackled a yard short of the goal line."I'm getting close to the end zone and I'm like, Why am I not getting tackled yet?'" Anderson said, chuckling. "We do a lot of sprints in practice, but I never thought I'd run that far."Three plays later, Luck connected on a 1-yard TD pass to fullback Ryan Hewitt to take a 27-0 lead. Taylor also scored on runs of 3 yards and 1 yard in the third quarter to put the Cardinal ahead 43-3.Luck and the rest of the starters were lifted, and even the backups kept piling up points.Harrison Waid kicked an 18-yard field goal in the second quarter for San Jose State's lone score. He also missed wide right from 23 yards.Faulkner finished 14 for 26 passing for 184 yards for San Jose State.The Spartans, who went 1-12 last season, have lost 18 straight against ranked teams. The last came in a 27-24 win over No. 9 TCU on Nov. 4, 2000.Playing against a Stanford team that finished 12-1 last season capped with an Orange Bowl victory over Virginia Tech, they didn't have a chance."We had nowhere to go," San Jose State coach Mike MacIntyre said. "They're a better team than we are, a much better team, and I think they'll have a great year."

Cal makes it 26 straight at home with win over UC Davis

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USATSI

Cal makes it 26 straight at home with win over UC Davis

BERKELEY -- Charlie Moore scored 22 points including a 3-pointer from just inside halfcourt and California beat UC Davis 86-61 on Saturday.

Grant Mullins added 17 points and four rebounds to help make up for an off night by Ivan Rabb as the Golden Bears (8-2) won their 26th consecutive home game, matching the longest streak in school history.

A freshman point guard who has been starting for coach Cuonzo Martin's team all season, Moore led California on an 18-3 run in the first half with a pair of steals and two layups. He later scored off another Davis turnover later in the half before banking in a 45-foot buzzer-beating 3-pointer.

The Bears' winning streak is the fourth-longest in the nation and matches the record set from Dec. 27, 1958-Dec. 16, 1960. California last lost at Haas Pavilion to Oregon on Feb. 25, 2015.

Davis committed 21 turnovers and put up little resistance in the first game between the two teams since 2010.

Chima Moneke had a career-high 24 points and 10 rebounds, and Brynton Lemar scored 14 for the Aggies (5-5), who closed within 44-30 early in the second half before the Bears pulled away.

BIG PICTURE

Davis has to be feeling good as it nears the end of its seven-game road trip - the team's longest since moving to Division I in 2008. Although they were outsized and a step slower for most of the game the Aggies showed some grit coming out of halftime and kept it interesting. Had they played that way the entire night the outcome might have been different. As it is, second-year coach Jim Les' squad has dropped three of four.

California was out of sync much of the night and, despite the score, couldn't put Davis away until late in the second half. That's been an ongoing issue for the Bears and one that could be a problem with the Pac-12 portion of the schedule coming up. Good thing the young players came up big. Rabb was uneven with his shot and was hindered with foul trouble. Bird gave the Bears an early spark then fizzled out.

UP NEXT

Davis: The Aggies travel to North Dakota State on Wednesday.

California: The Bears get a break after playing four games in seven days and will host Cal Poly on Saturday.

Lamar Jackson of Louisville wins 2016 Heisman trophy

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Lamar Jackson of Louisville wins 2016 Heisman trophy

NEW YORK —  Lamar Jackson leapt over a loaded field of Heisman Trophy contenders early in the season and by the time he slowed down nobody could catch him.

The sensational sophomore quarterback became the first Louisville player to win the Heisman Trophy on Saturday night, beating out preseason favorite Deshaun Watson of Clemson despite some late-season struggles.

Baker Mayfield finished third and Oklahoma teammate and fellow finalist Dede Westbrook was fourth. Michigan's Jabrill Peppers was fifth.

Watson, who finished third in Heisman voting last year, led a stacked group of contenders entering this season that included five of the top seven vote-getters in 2015.

Jackson outdid them all in his first season as Louisville's full-time starter, accounting for 51 touchdowns and averaging 410 yards per game in total offense. He ultimately won going away, with 2,144 points to Watson's 1,524. By percentage of possible points received, Jackson's victory was the sixth largest in Heisman history, and he became the youngest winner at 19 years, 352 days.

Jackson is the first Heisman Trophy winner to play on a team that lost its last two games of the regular season since Tim Brown of Notre Dame in 1987. He's the first to enter the postseason without a chance to win the national title since Johnny Manziel of Texas A&M in 2012.

No matter. Jackson did so much before November it was difficult to deny him the award because of a couple of missteps at the end.

He provided a signature moment against Syracuse, hurdling a defender on his way into the end zone, and then played his best against Louisville's toughest competition.

In a romp over Florida State and a close loss at Clemson, Jackson threw for 511 yards, ran for 308 and accounted for eight touchdowns. After ripping apart Florida State in September, he earned the stamp of approval from his idol, former Virginia Tech and NFL star Mike Vick.

Jackson left that Oct. 1 game in Death Valley as a threat to run away with the Heisman, but losses to Houston and Kentucky, when he committed four turnovers, in late November provided an opportunity for others to sway voters.

Watson made the biggest surge, but ultimately fell short.

Jackson continues a recent trend of breakout stars winning the Heisman. He is the sixth player to win the award as either a redshirt freshman or sophomore, all since 2007, joining Manziel (redshirt freshman), Jameis Winston (redshirt freshman), Mark Ingram (sophomore), Sam Bradford (sophomore) and Tim Tebow (sophomore).

Jackson came to Louisville as a three-star recruit from Boynton Beach High School in Florida. Some colleges were not sold on him as a quarterback, but Jackson was such a dynamic talented Louisville coach Bobby Petrino altered his offense to accommodate Jackson's speed and elusiveness.

Jackson flashed brilliance as a freshman and showed what was to come in the Music City Bowl against Texas A&M. He had 453 total yards and led Louisville to a victory.

Still, with so many well-established stars from Watson and Mayfield to running backs Christian McCaffrey of Stanford, Dalvin Cook of Florida State and Leonard Fournette of LSU, Jackson entered the season without much fanfare.

Just the way he likes it.

Jackson spent this season adjusting to newfound fame, growing into the role of face of the team and trying to stay out of the spotlight. He said he cut down on trips to the mall to avoid the inevitable crowds he drew.

He is about to become even more popular. Especially back in Louisville, where he has another year before he can even consider his next big jump — to the NFL.