Novak Djokovic ... greatest athlete in the world

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Novak Djokovic ... greatest athlete in the world

From Comcast SportsNetPARIS (AP) -- What a horrific dilemma this could be. The men's 100 meter sprint final and men's tennis final fall on the same day, Aug. 5, at the London Olympics. If forced, which of those would you choose to miss: Usain Bolt possibly becoming the first man since Carl Lewis to win the 100 dash at consecutive games or Novak Djokovic perhaps putting a golden sheen on what promises to be another astounding year? Until Sunday, Bolt would have been a comfortable winner. But now? Impossible choice. And what a memorable day it could prove to be for those with time to rush from one event to the other or to tune into both. Like Bolt, Djokovic is becoming one of those special athletes who transcends the confines of their sport, a figure whose achievements on the field of play teach us not only new things about sporting endeavor but also about the bottomless well of human possibility. Bolt's 100, 200 and relay golds at the 2008 Beijing Games made the Jamaican more than just an Olympic champion sprinter but one of the greatest sportsmen of all time because he redefined our understanding of how fast humans can run. Likewise, in outlasting Rafael Nadal for 5 hours and 53 minutes in the longest ever Grand Slam final, Djokovic played far more than a mere tennis match to win the Australian Open. He tested our definition of human endurance. How, just how, did he find those last drops of energy to first reel in and then finish off the Spaniard who, with a 4-2 lead in the fifth set, looked as though he might wriggle free? It was the incredible will Djokovic demonstrated that made this feat immortal. Like Muhammad Ali flooring George Foreman with a left, then a right in the eighth round of the Rumble in the Jungle or Lance Armstrong picking himself up from a crash at the 2003 Tour de France and powering up a climb with cold-eyed fury on his broken bike, this was epic because it was as much about heart as it was about physical ability. "You're going through so much suffering, your toes are bleeding," Djokovic said. "Everything is just outrageous, you know, but you're still enjoying that pain." At the end, he ripped open his shirt with a primal scream. It wouldn't have been that much of a shock if Djokovic had also ripped open his hairy chest to show us just how fiercely his ticker beats. What a terrifying sight for Andy Murray and Roger Federer. Is Djokovic the most impressive athlete in activity? Certainly, he is part of the debate that that question provokes. We would have to forgive Djokovic if he started to wear his underpants outside of his trousers. The hypochondriac Djokovic who in years past looked unlikely to ever match Nadal's physicality, the joker Djokovic who seemed unlikely to equal Federer's cool professionalism, has been body-snatched and replaced by Superman on a gluten-free diet. Murray, the world No. 4, came away from his five-set, 4 hour and 50-minute Australian semifinal loss to Djokovic feeling that he is edging closer to the No. 1. Maybe. But two days later, on Sunday, Djokovic and Nadal then shifted the benchmark yet further forward. The ferocity of their contest made the idea that Murray could beat first one of them and then the other in a Grand Slam semifinal and final look fanciful again. Same goes for Federer, the No. 3. As long as Nadal and Djokovic are fit, it's only going to get ever harder for the 30-year-old Swiss to get his hands on a 17th Grand Slam title by toppling those men five and six years his junior. From Nadal, Sunday's final offered some evidence that the No. 2 no longer looks in trepidation across the net at Djokovic and that the deep hurt done to his confidence by losing six finals to the Serb last year may not be permanent. In becoming the first man to lose three consecutive Grand Slam finals, all to Djokovic, at least Nadal this time pushed his nemesis to five sets. But as positive as Nadal sounded about this defeat -- "I always said is good suffer, enjoy -- enjoy suffering, no?" -- will the scabs on his psyche simply flake right off the next time they meet? One hopes not. Because, like the very best Hollywood blockbusters, this epic cried out for a sequel and left us hungry for more. Some, including 7-time major winner Mats Wilander, are already talking up the possibility of a calendar Grand Slam for Djokovic this year. That is premature, but won't be if Djokovic wins the French Open -- the only major he let slip away in 2011 -- this June. After that, Wimbledon's Center Court will be calling, with the men's final on July 8 and the Olympic final a month later. Just imagine if those produce a Djokovic-Nadal double-bill. If that happens, then the Aug. 5 dilemma won't seem so quite knotty anymore. Anyone want tickets for Bolt?

Penn's only sack allowed last season got Carr hurt; 'That play sticks with me'

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Penn's only sack allowed last season got Carr hurt; 'That play sticks with me'

Donald Penn was nothing short of awesome last season. The veteran Raiders left tackle proved impenetrable, allowing just one sack and 27 quarterback pressures in 676 pass-blocking snaps.

He ranked high among the NFL’s best left tackles at 33, engulfed a career renaissance that began after joining the Raiders three years ago. Penn made the Pro Bowl. He was a vital piece of a 12-4 team that helped the Raiders reach the playoffs.

He hasn’t reveled much in that. Penn’s driven by opportunities missed, and one mishap that haunts him still.

Penn locked horns with Indianapolis linebacker Trent Cole off the left edge during a Week 16 contest against the Colts, and slipped as he was tracking his man away from the pocket. Penn’s feet got tangled and the big man fell. Cole remained upright, darted in and sacked quarterback Derek Carr.

It was Penn’s only sack allowed all season. And Carr got hurt. He suffered a broken fibula that ended his season and realistic hopes of a Raiders playoff run.

Nearly five months have passed since that fluke play. Carr is healthy and a full participant in the Raiders offseason program. The Raiders offensive line might be better after allowing a league-low 18 sacks last season.

There’s plenty to be excited about as the Raiders enter OTAs and a mandatory minicamp. Penn can’t help but lament that isolated incident when Carr went down.

“You have to be an athlete. You try not to think about it too much,” Penn said Tuesday. “You wish you could go back and get it back. I’ve taken that same set I don’t know how many times, on the same field and never just slipped out of nowhere. I’m not going to put it on myself. I should have been able to do something better. You know me, I’m never going to blame the slip for happening. I should have blocked him and held on to him and taken him down with me. That play sticks with me.”

That isn’t all bad. It fuels Penn to continue growing as a player, even at 34 coming off an excellent Pro Bowl season.

“I’m going to try to do what I can do better and make sure it never happens again,” Penn said. “I’ve never gotten a quarterback hurt in my life since I’ve been playing. That was a first. That’s something I take pride in. I’m going to try my hardest to make sure that doesn’t happen again.”

Penn wants a different ending to this season. Last year the Raiders lost the AFC West crown and a shot to win the team’s first playoff game. Penn suffered a knee injury the following week that kept him from playing in the postseason.

The goal is to realize vast potential now that the Raiders offense is back healthy again.

“I’m all about karma and stuff like that,” Penn said. “Maybe (God is) trying to tell us that this is our year. We have to put in the work to get it. I know D.C. is happy, I’m dang sure happy to get him back. We’re growing and masterminding this offense trying to make it as explosive as possible.”

Mariners designate former Giants pitcher for assignment

Mariners designate former Giants pitcher for assignment

CHICAGO -- Chris Heston was hopeful a move to a new organization could give his career a jolt. It hasn't worked out that way.

The former Giant was designated for assignment on Wednesday by the Mariners, who earlier acquired an outfielder from the Astros and needed the roster spot. Heston was traded to Seattle at the winter meetings for a player to be named later. The Giants have not yet picked that player off a list the teams agreed to.

Heston had a 3.95 ERA as a starter for the Giants in 2015 and threw a no-hitter at Citi Field, but he had trouble transitioning to relief the next season and dealt with an injury in Triple-A. Needing a roster spot in December, the Giants traded him.

Heston started Sunday for Seattle and gave up six earned runs in three innings. He allowed five earned in two innings in his previous appearance.