Goodell turning NFL into a drag


Goodell turning NFL into a drag

In the good old days when the NFL was better at selling and not so interested in bullying its customers and employees, it would have found a way to make its officials lockout more . . . well, fun.

Celebrity officials would have been the start, or lucky fan officials, or Vote For Your Favorite Ridiculous Call. They might even have had one game where the players and coaches called their own penalties, although Jim Harbaugh would not have been involved in that because he would be too busy trying to swindle the other side on every play.

In short, they would have monetized their labor problem by making it interactive, and monetizing the hell out of it. And because they are the best at doing those things, theyd have been great at it.

Instead, they have done what is the hallmark of the Goodell-Taking-Orders Administration. They have decided their marketing campaign would be him frowning and snarling, This isnt about what you want. Its about what we want. Bow to your corporate overlords.

Thats not the message you, the customer, wants to hear, but it is the message his 32 bosses want to give. In fighting so stridently and arrogantly for so little money, they are upholding a principle that is near and dear to them -- their right to win everything, every time.

Hey, its a nice philosophy if you can pull it off, but in America, where the culture runs on the myths and whims of entertainment, the audience likes to be jollied along while its being taken for its walk. They want the purveyors of the entertainment to pretend they care, and theyll buy almost any stupid premise if they think the boss is at least trying to play along.

But the NFL in the Goodell-As-Front-Man Era is defined by the notion that the owners entertainment comes first, and their entertainment is not about anyones fun but their own. And their fun seems mostly to be derived by letting everyone know that their fun crushing employees who want a raise, mostly -- comes first.

Thus, the latest spate of officiating failures will be filed away with all the others, wrapped in a nice press release that says, Theyre doing a GREAT job, damn it, and thats an order.

As always, inflexible, bullying, and tone-deaf. The three things that sell poorest in a consumer economy.

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What happened to the good old slap-and-tickle the NFL used to be so good at? The warm and fuzzy feature about this line judge who used to sell insurance and work at Kinkos to put his kids through high school? A Rich Eisen essay on the Lingerie Football Leagues officiating school? A Football Follies episode on Ed Hochulis guns in repose?

What happened, in short, to the NFLs willingness to laugh at itself while still having the wit and reach to find your wallet? Its gone, replaced by two middle fingers and a Take It Or Leave It, And Then Get Screwed On The Other Side motto. It has replaced the game on the field with the game in the boardroom as its raison-detre. Its given us months upon months of Whats best for the owners in their constant struggle to make more money than God?

They have, in short, embraced the idea that the owners are the reason for the season, and owners are notoriously poor at finding the humor in anything that involves labor relations.

So Goodell gets his twice-monthly check and juts his jaw out, reminding everyone that what they are seeing every Thursday, Sunday and Monday is actually not bad officiating, but good officiating, and then trying to bully compliance with fines or other punishments.

This wasnt his M.O. when he took the job. He was going to be warmer and fuzzier than Paul Tagliabue, an admittedly subterranean bar to clear, and he is somehow managing to fail at it. Not because he is having an argument with officials over compensation, but because hes been so deadly dull, dry and humorless about it.

Roger Goodell has committed the unforgivable sin. In being the front man for the owners, he decided to model their behaviors rather than soft-focus them. He has become a dean of students. Hes turning the NFL into a drag, and himself along the way.

LB Smith praises Raiders' turnover ratio, but wants much more

LB Smith praises Raiders' turnover ratio, but wants much more

SARASOTA, Fla. – The Raiders defense gave up 344 yards Sunday while beating the Jacksonville Jaguars.

That sum’s a season low, still way too many for Malcolm Smith. The Raiders weakside linebacker has higher standards, even after one of two solid defensive efforts in seven games.

“That’s still a lot of yards,” Smith said. “We’re not where we want to be.”

Just because Sunday was better doesn’t mean it’s good enough. The Raiders defense ranks last in yards allowed and 22nd in scoring defense at 25.6 points per game.

There’s a main reason why the Raiders aren’t dead last in both categories. Takeaways.

The Raiders have plundered the opposition this season 13 times in seven games. Special teams got one Sunday on a muffed punt, but the defense has been incredibly active stealing possession.

Reggie Nelson has a nose for the ball, with two interceptions and two fumble recoveries. Sean Smith and David Amerson have two picks each and Bruce Irvin leads the league with four forced fumbles.

Turnovers make all those yards allowed easy to stomach, and has kept the Raiders in several close games. The force big mistakes and don’t make many, proven with a plus-eight turnover ratio ranked No. 3 overall.

“It’s given us a chance to win some games, where you could just look at other statistics and say we wouldn’t have a chance.” Smith said. “That’s what the game is about, and us finding ways to compete. Hopefully we stay after it that way.”

The Raiders have stayed after it in the red zone, allowing touchdowns on just 50 percent of opponent trips inside their 20-yard line.

While big plays have brought wins and positivity to the defense, the season’s first half has been difficult for Raiders expecting more.

“It’s definitely frustrating,” Smith said. “You come into the year with all these aspirations and things you want to do. When it doesn’t go your way you have to stay after it, keep putting the work in and know it’s not going to be wasted. Hopefully we’re making strides and those improvements will show on Sundays.”

The Raiders believe the defense is close to being good, and has done a solid job masking issues with takeaways and timely production.

“Our team has done a great job of competing to win games,” Smith said. “If we keep doing that, everything will be fine.”

Del Rio pleased with Raiders' mature attitude towards 5-2 start

Del Rio pleased with Raiders' mature attitude towards 5-2 start

SARASOTA, Fla. – The Raiders were certainly happy they beat the Jacksonville Jaguars into submission. They jumped out to a strong halftime lead, played smart complimentary football and, at 33-16, ended up with a large margin of victory.

All, however, was not right with the world.

Derek Carr lamented settling for too many field goals. Latavius Murray wanted more efficiency from his runs. Defensive players saw progress in several deficient areas, still seeking greater cohesion and consistency.

[BAIR: Top 5 takeaways from Raiders' 33-16 win over Jaguars]

Sunday’s big victory over lowly Jacksonville was not a sign they've arrived. It was proof these Raiders remain a work in progress.

Records normally suffer with much to correct. These Raiders are 5-2, and feel better football’s ahead.

“That’s what is great about this team is that we haven’t played our best yet,” Murray said. “That’s a good feeling moving forward, knowing there are things you can get better at and you’re still 5-2.”

Winning while fixing things; that’s a coach’s dream. It’s also easier when players know it, that egos don’t expand and confidence doesn’t become arrogance.

“I like that part. I like the fact that we recognize it,” Raiders head coach Jack Del Rio said. “I’m certainly going to point it out. There are things that we have to do better. I think it’s healthy.

“You should enjoy the wins. You should feel good about the success. Take pride in it. We worked hard for it, but to have a healthy respect for what’s coming and the need to play better and the need to continue to grow as a football team as we go throughout the year. That’s a mature way to look at it, and I’m very pleased about that with a younger team.”

The Raiders are a confident bunch and have survived several games on guts, guile and turnovers -- a recipe for success with inconsistent production.

The Raiders defense believes it made strides in the Jaguars win, though there’s significant work remaining to be a decent defense. With the offense rolling, that’s all the Raiders need to be a top team. Defenders aren’t striving for decent. They want more, and believe that realizing potential could put them in position for a playoff push.

“This team has so much talent, with good coaches and good players,” cornerback David Amerson said. “The sky’s the limit. Once we all start clicking, we can go out there and beat teams 30-0. Once we get to that point, that’s when we can look towards the playoffs and things like that. We have just as much talent as any team in the league.”