McFadden's Lisfranc injury -- no surgery

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McFadden's Lisfranc injury -- no surgery

UPDATE: Raiders coach Hue Jackson insisted at Monday's press conference that the foot injury to running back Darren McFadden will not require surgery.

The Raiders have termed Darren McFadden's injury a "foot sprain." NFL analyst Phil Simms said Sunday it's a "Lisfranc injury." For those of us without the expertise of an orthopedic surgeon, what does it mean in layman's terms?

Whether you believe Simms or are merely acknowledging that McFadden has missed six straight games, it's not a good situation.

According to Raiders coach Hue Jackson on Monday, McFadden -- who was off to the best start of his career with a 5.4-yard average before he was hobbled -- will not require surgery.

RELATED: Jackson disputes Simms' Sunday report

Ive been told that he has a midfoot sprain, which is just like a Lisfranc sprain, however you see that. Its the same. Its really one and the same. And I know one can require -- both can require surgery. Both can require you to be out several, several weeks. So I think theyre all in that same family. I just think how you describe it, based on one when you say Lisfranc, really means surgical," Jackson said.

"You got to go in and fix it right away in order to get it to heal properly. I think thats why when people hear that term I think everybody goes, Oh my gosh, thats what he has. No, he does not need surgery. That much I do know. You guys can write that. Darren McFadden does not need surgery.

Bottom line: If it is a Lisfranc injury, McFadden's injury could be season-ending despite Jackson's assurances to the contrary. At worst case, it could impact his career.

For reference, look no further than Texans QB Matt Schaub, who was placed on season-ending injured reserve and is scheduled for surgery following a Lisfranc injury in mid-November.

Similarly, Colts defensive end Dwight Freeney was sidelined for the rest of the 2007 season with a Lisfranc injury following Week 9. Same for former Dolphins running back Ronnie Brown, who sustained the same injury in 2009. Freeney has returned as a Pro Bowler; Brown has been consigned to backup status.

Then there's the case of Browns running back Errict Rhett. He suffered a Lisfranc injury in October 2000 and never played in another regular-season game.

Regardless of the severity, it's a good thing McFadden is a football player and not a member of the French calvary under Napoleon.

The Lisfranc injury dates to the days of the French general, and is named after field surgeon Jacques Lisfranc de St. Martin who specialized in amputation of the front part of the foot -- to prevent gangrene and get Napoleon's soldiers back into combat.

When soldiers fell from their horses, their feet would often get caught in the stirrups, resulting in a fracture of the mid-foot, where the long bones (metatarsal) are displaced from the smaller bones at the front of the foot (tarsus).

In football players, the injury is caused by a similar type of twisting-under-force move.

Treatment options do not always require an operation.

If it merely an injury to the ligament that holds the bones in place, immobilization in a walking boot is the most typical option. If the dislocation is slight, the injury can be treated by casting, with no weight allowed on the foot.

If an operation is needed, screws are used for internal fixation of the fracture. This could result in keeping the individual completely off the foot for 6-to-12 weeks.

Relocation approval 'offers more clarity' when Raiders recruit future free agents

Relocation approval 'offers more clarity' when Raiders recruit future free agents

PHOENIX -- The Raiders are entering a limbo period, with just a few seasons in Oakland before relocating to Las Vegas. NFL owners formally approved a move on Monday, though the Raiders don’t want to leave the East Bay until a new stadium is ready in 2020.

While there are contingencies to leave the market early based upon how fans react to the Raiders remaining in Oakland after committing to Las Vegas, that isn’t what the Raiders want. After years of stadium uncertainty, they leave the NFL owners meetings with clarity regarding their long-term future.

General manager Reggie McKenzie believes that should help free agents considering silver and black. The uncertainty prompted questions in recent years that McKenzie can answer when recruiting veteran talent now that relocation has been approved.

“By Mark saying that the plan is for us to be in Oakland for two more years (at least), but we will be in Vegas, I think it offers more clarity,” McKenzie said. “It lets the players know. It’s better than two months ago, when everyone had questions. When you were talking to a free agent, they know we want to move but weren’t sure if it was going to pass. They didn’t know. Now they know a decision has been made by the league to let us move.”

That will help McKenzie more in the future than present. Roster turnover is high these days, meaning most currently employed by the Raiders won’t play for the home team in Las Vegas. Only David Amerson, Kelechi Osemele and Marquette King are would be under contract when the team wants to move.

The Raiders are working on extensions for Derek Carr, Gabe Jackson and Khalil Mack, with others possibly locked up down the line.

In addition to playing with Carr and Mack and for head coach Jack Del Rio, there’s another attraction to signing with the Raiders. There’s no state income tax in Nevada, meaning a contract there is worth more than the same deal in California. The Golden State generally takes 13.3 percent of significant income earned there.

There will be other issues about playing in Las Vegas, where gambling is legal, a drink can be had 24 hours per day and vices abound in a place called Sin City.

The Raiders will construct a support system to keep players focused, and are ready to handle any questions players and their families may have about an upcoming move.

“Now there are questions from the drafted guys about when they become free agents, because they might be in Vegas. That’s going to be different. There are questions that way, but it’s not going to alter the way we go after players. Some of the guys, parents and agents may have questions, but I don’t think it’s anything out of whack.”

 

NFL centralizes replay reviews, Del Rio wants more freedom in challenges

NFL centralizes replay reviews, Del Rio wants more freedom in challenges

PHOENIX – Fans won’t see special teams players leaping over the long snapper in an attempt to block a field goal or extra point. Seattle’s Kam Chancellor made some big plays with that technique, but won’t have the chance anymore.

The NFL outlawed that option on Tuesday as one several rule changes enacted at the league meetings.

“There are some safety concerns,” Raiders head coach Jack Del Rio said. “that are legitimate.”

The NFL also centralized replay reviews, taking that power away from officials on the field. NFL head of officiating Dean Blandino and associates at the NFL’s command center will handle reviews in an effort to add consistency to important calls.

Del Rio hoped replay challenges would be expanded further, but a proposal by Seattle and Buffalo allowing coaches to challenge any play save scoring plays and turnovers, which are automatically reviewed, did not pass.

“I think there are a number of coaches who feel like, if there’s an obvious error, we should have a mechanism to correct it,” Del Rio said. “We catch most of them, so you’re talking about a small percentage. It’s hard to move the needle for such a small percentage. That’s the problem. The fact is, if it’s important enough that we’re willing to use that challenge, we’d like that right and ability. Things happen, and you don’t want to lose a big game, a game that decides whether you advance in the playoffs or make the playoffs and it’s something you could overturn, that you could challenge or change. Why not?”

Here's a list of new rules and bylaws adopted by the league on Tuesday.