McFadden's Lisfranc injury -- no surgery

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McFadden's Lisfranc injury -- no surgery

UPDATE: Raiders coach Hue Jackson insisted at Monday's press conference that the foot injury to running back Darren McFadden will not require surgery.

The Raiders have termed Darren McFadden's injury a "foot sprain." NFL analyst Phil Simms said Sunday it's a "Lisfranc injury." For those of us without the expertise of an orthopedic surgeon, what does it mean in layman's terms?

Whether you believe Simms or are merely acknowledging that McFadden has missed six straight games, it's not a good situation.

According to Raiders coach Hue Jackson on Monday, McFadden -- who was off to the best start of his career with a 5.4-yard average before he was hobbled -- will not require surgery.

RELATED: Jackson disputes Simms' Sunday report

Ive been told that he has a midfoot sprain, which is just like a Lisfranc sprain, however you see that. Its the same. Its really one and the same. And I know one can require -- both can require surgery. Both can require you to be out several, several weeks. So I think theyre all in that same family. I just think how you describe it, based on one when you say Lisfranc, really means surgical," Jackson said.

"You got to go in and fix it right away in order to get it to heal properly. I think thats why when people hear that term I think everybody goes, Oh my gosh, thats what he has. No, he does not need surgery. That much I do know. You guys can write that. Darren McFadden does not need surgery.

Bottom line: If it is a Lisfranc injury, McFadden's injury could be season-ending despite Jackson's assurances to the contrary. At worst case, it could impact his career.

For reference, look no further than Texans QB Matt Schaub, who was placed on season-ending injured reserve and is scheduled for surgery following a Lisfranc injury in mid-November.

Similarly, Colts defensive end Dwight Freeney was sidelined for the rest of the 2007 season with a Lisfranc injury following Week 9. Same for former Dolphins running back Ronnie Brown, who sustained the same injury in 2009. Freeney has returned as a Pro Bowler; Brown has been consigned to backup status.

Then there's the case of Browns running back Errict Rhett. He suffered a Lisfranc injury in October 2000 and never played in another regular-season game.

Regardless of the severity, it's a good thing McFadden is a football player and not a member of the French calvary under Napoleon.

The Lisfranc injury dates to the days of the French general, and is named after field surgeon Jacques Lisfranc de St. Martin who specialized in amputation of the front part of the foot -- to prevent gangrene and get Napoleon's soldiers back into combat.

When soldiers fell from their horses, their feet would often get caught in the stirrups, resulting in a fracture of the mid-foot, where the long bones (metatarsal) are displaced from the smaller bones at the front of the foot (tarsus).

In football players, the injury is caused by a similar type of twisting-under-force move.

Treatment options do not always require an operation.

If it merely an injury to the ligament that holds the bones in place, immobilization in a walking boot is the most typical option. If the dislocation is slight, the injury can be treated by casting, with no weight allowed on the foot.

If an operation is needed, screws are used for internal fixation of the fracture. This could result in keeping the individual completely off the foot for 6-to-12 weeks.

Carr discusses contract negotiations with Raiders: 'These things take time'

Carr discusses contract negotiations with Raiders: 'These things take time'

Raiders general Reggie McKenzie plans to extend quarterback Derek Carr’s contract this offseason. That isn’t a new thing, something that has been in the works for some time. He re-affirmed that fact last week, citing his team’s commitment to work out a long-term deal likely the biggest in franchise history.

Carr was reportedly frustrated with the pace of contract talks after the NFL draft – they’re supposed to heat up this spring and summer – but said he believes a deal will get worked out before training camp begins.

That’s his deadline for an offseason deal, the point where he wants focus honed on football.

“I have an agent who is in charge of that and I am confident that he and Mr. (Reggie) McKenzie will work it out,” Carr, a Fresno State alum, told the Fresno Bee. “I am only focused on becoming a better football player and helping my teammates become better players.

“I have complete faith it will get done before training camp. These things take time. The Raiders know I want to be here; this is my family, and I know they want me to be their quarterback.”

The sides have discussed parameters of a long-term deal, with greater specifics to be ironed out in the future. Carr has long said he wants to be a Raider his entire career. The Raiders want him as the public face of their franchise. A new deal is expected by all parties, a sentiment that has never wavered on either side.

Carr is scheduled to make a $977,519 in base salary in 2017, the final year of his rookie contract.

Raiders offseason program intensifies as OTA sessions begin

Raiders offseason program intensifies as OTA sessions begin

The Raiders offseason program is five weeks old. Players have lifted weights. They’ve improved cardiovascular shape. They’ve done drills in position groups and discussed schematics. They’ve added rookies to a group now 90 strong.

On Monday, they can finally put on helmets. They still can’t wear pads or have full contact, but the Raiders can play 11-on-11. Receivers will be covered. Quarterback Derek Carr will throw into traffic. Generally speaking, the competition cranks up a bit.

The NFL collective bargaining agreement has strict mandates regarding offseason activity, and a period formally called “Phase III” allows for more realistic on-field football work.

The Raiders will conduct 10 OTA sessions over the next three weeks. The media can watch three of them. Tuesday is the first, with another in each of the next two weeks. These sessions are technically voluntary, though the Raiders generally hover around perfect attendance. Head coach Jack Del Rio prefers his team be unified in the offseason. Players know it and show up.

There is a mandatory minicamp from June 13-15 which wraps the offseason program and starts a quiet period that extends until training camp begins in late July.

These OTAs offer an opportunity for new players to learn the system, for adjustments to be made and for chemistry to be built heading into a 2017 season where expectations are high.