Raiders Notebook: Nnamdi Still Feeling Ankle

Raiders Notebook: Nnamdi Still Feeling Ankle

Nov. 15, 2010GUTIERREZ ARCHIVERAIDERS PAGE RAIDERS VIDEOPaul GutierrezCSNCalifornia.com

ALAMEDA The Raiders byeweek served at least one purpose in that it afforded several keyplayers injuries time to heal without missing another game.The list: QB Bruce Gradkowski (shoulder) and WR Louis Murphy (chest) have been cleared to start practicing.TE Zach Miller (foot) should be ready to practice Wednesday while DTJohn Henderson (foot) and cornerback Nnamdi Asomugha (ankle) are onpace to practice.WR Darrius Heyward-Bey (hamstring) is questionable to practice while WR Chaz Schilens (knee) will not practice.Asomugha met with reporters today for the first time since badlyspraining his right ankle stepping on Seattle rookie receiver GoldenTates ankle in coverage down the left sideline on Oct. 31. I sprained it both ways, inside and out, Asomugha said. Yeah, so it was pretty serious.I was pretty worried when it happened because Ihadnt felt that typeof pain before. Then they said there as no bone breaks or anything likethat so I felt a lot better after that. Butits the most significantinjury that Ive had since my rookie year. So anything that forces meto miss a game is going to be something that I think is serious.Asomugha was non-committal about playing Sunday in Pittsburgh but saidhe did not necessarily have to be at 100 percent to take the field.Because then youll be waiting all season; I have injuries or get hurtjust about every game, he said. My mindset has been now to just getit as good as possible and just (play) because you just hate missinggames.In case you forgot, coach Tom Cable has reversed field and said JasonCampbell is now the starting quarterback for the foreseeable future.Two weeks ago, he said Gradkowski was the man as soon as his shoulderhealed.Quarterback will be Jason, Cable said. He will starthes earned theright to do that. Four out of the last five games are wins. And Brucewill back him up and well move forward from there.Got it? Good.Cable acknowledged that he asked players during training camp dinnerswhat their favorites sports movies were. Of course, Cable was asked thesame.Brians Song? Any Given Sunday? North Dallas Forty? The Longest Yard? Necessary Roughness?No, no football films. Cables choice was Miracle, the story of the1980 U.S. Olympic ice hockey teams improbable march to the Gold medal.File that away for future reference.

Carr, Raiders both win with soon-to-be mega-deal done at right time

Carr, Raiders both win with soon-to-be mega-deal done at right time

If Derek Carr gets his $25 million deal from the Oakland Raiders and becomes the richest quarterback in National Football League history, the Raiders will have gotten a bargain.
 
Unless he gets hurt.
 
Or unless he turns lousy.
 
Or unless the NFL’s defensive coordinators decipher a way to strip him of his powers and render him McCown-tastic.
 
Or unless football happens in a hundred other ways, because of all the sports ever devised by wealthy man to amuse sedentary man, football taught cruelty to the landmine discus.
 
But the same can be said for any football player at any salary. Carr, on the other hand, is a qualified practitioner at a sport that has very few of them – maybe 10 if you’re looking at football, 119 if you’re trying to tot up all the quarterbacks who got contracts so Colin Kaepernick couldn’t.
 
That means he is a rare commodity, and the Raiders did the right thing by tying him up. The alternative, you see, is Kirk Cousins and the Washington Supreme Court-Mandated Native-American Heads.
 
Cousins was not signed when the Washingtons could have gotten him at a high but still reasonable rate, and now he is one year away from being franchised a third time at the hilarious figure of $34.47 million per year.
 
The lesson is clear. Nothing pays like procrastination, and by waiting to give Cousins what they knew they’d have to give him eventually for choosing him over Robert Griffin III, the Battling Snyders will pay through both nostrils, ears, eye sockets and mouth to keep him.
 
By signing Carr now, the Raiders have as much cost certainty as they can have at the position, and all they have to do now is (a) keep him stocked with supporting players and (b) keep him safe from opposing ones.
 
This isn’t easy, of course; most quarterbacks eventually end up in a fiery crash in Turn Two, and their ability to escape the mangled wreckage is the only thing keeping them from becoming part of the mangled wreckage.
 
So yeah, luck. Lots of luck.
 
On the other hand, the Raiders could have guaranteed that they would have had to overpay by a factor of 1.5 or maybe more by not signing him now, or they could have saved millions more by losing him entirely, which would have been just the gift for the discerning Las Vegas ticket holder who wanted an excuse not to buy tickets.
 
Essentially, Carr played the system brilliantly, and good for him since under most circumstances the system plays the players. Football players have a short enough career, and a shorter than average quality of life, so the rule of thumb should always be getting everything available and as much guaranteed as possible.
 
In fact, were I Derek Carr, I’d ask for ALL the money to be guaranteed just to set a standard for those who come behind me.
 
But if he’s happy – and let’s wait to see how much of this deal is actually guaranteed and how much is placed on a rug that will be pulled out from beneath him – and the Raiders are happy – and why wouldn’t they be? – then there’s nobody to complain, now, is there?
 
Now the Raiders of old would have screwed this up, and somehow Carr would have done so as well. But this team hasn’t done anything regally boneheaded since . . . well, trying to go to Los Angeles . . . or maybe hiring Dennis Allen . . . or . . . 
 
Oh, never mind. The point is, Carr was done at the right time, at the right number, for the right reasons, and both sides should be delighted.
 
And in nine or twelve or seventeen days when Matthew Stafford gets a deal that makes him a dollar more than Derek Carr . . . well, we’ll let the amateur accountants who think NFL contracts define players sort out that level of idiocy.

Report: Raiders, Carr close to finalizing massive contract extension

Report: Raiders, Carr close to finalizing massive contract extension

The Raiders want to extend Derek Carr’s contract. The franchise quarterback wants a deal done by training camp. That timeline has always worked for both sides, which are committed to a long-term union.

They might not need the full allotment to complete this pact. The Raiders are close to completing a contract extension with Carr that could make be worth approximately $25 million per year, ESPN’s Adam Schefter reported on Wednesday afternoon.

That falls in line with the franchise quarterback market. Andrew Luck’s five-year contract is worth $24.6 million per year, and sources have long indicated that would be a launching point for Carr’s extension.

Carr himself was quick to point out a deal isn’t done. He said so on Twitter moments after the Schefter report, saying “Nothing done yet…trust me you will hear it here first.”

Carr’s right. A deal hasn’t been finalized, but the expectation is that it will happen. Schefter reports a deal could be done by the end of this week.

The start of training camp was Carr’s deadline – he said he’d play out his rookie contract if an extension wasn’t done by then -- but the 26-year old signal caller wants a deal done as soon as possible.

He doesn’t like talking about business. He hates it when teammates get asked about it. Carr wants focus on football, and signing a market-value contract extension will do exactly that.

A hometown discount was never in the cards. It never is in regard to franchise quarterbacks across the league. Their value is immense and they get paid accordingly. A proposed length of the deal remains uncertain and, with all NFL contracts, the devil’s in the details and guaranteed funds. Carr’s guaranteed figure should be high, especially in early portions of the contract.

The Raiders budgeted to pay Carr, right guard Gabe Jackson and edge rusher Khalil Mack in a relatively compact space. They have $32 million in salary cap space heading into the 2017 season, and could offer massive up-front money to their quarterback.

The contract would certainly set a franchise record and could make Carr the NFLs highest paid player. He’s in line for such status now because he slipped to the 2014 NFL draft’s second round – fifth-year contract options are only available to first-round picks – and his emergence as an MVP candidate last year.

Carr has made giant leaps in each of the last two seasons. Last year was his best. Carr had 3,937 passing yards 28 touchdowns, six interceptions, a 96.7 passer rating and seven-fourth quarter comebacks during a 12-4 campaign that snapped a long Raiders playoff drought. Carr broke his fibula in Week 16 and his absence proved his value. The Raiders struggled mightily without him, and were bounced in the postseason opener. He’s completely healthy and again and has been a full participant in the Raiders offseason program. That stretch ended last week. Carr is expected to start training camp with a long-term contract completed.