Raiders seek to avoid layoffs with ticket sales plan

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Raiders seek to avoid layoffs with ticket sales plan

May 18, 2011RAIDERS PAGE RAIDERS VIDEO

ALAMEDA (AP) With no minicamps, offseason workouts or other football activities during the NFL lockout, every member of the Oakland Raiders organization is now part of the ticket staff.

Instead of forcing employees to take pay cuts or unpaid furloughs during the lockout as several teams are doing, the Raiders have implemented a plan that allows people to keep their full salary if they sell a certain number of season tickets.

"Different teams are taking different approaches," Raiders chief executive officer Amy Trask said Wednesday. "Certainly some teams are taking one approach: How do we decrease expenses during a work stoppage. We looked at this from the opposite approach. Let's all work together as an organization, every single department, to increase our ticket revenues."

To avoid a pay cut, employees must sell season tickets worth 10 percent of their salary during the lockout. For example, an employee making 60,000 a year would have to sell 500 worth of season tickets for each month of the lockout, which began March 12.

The cheapest season tickets for the Raiders cost 260 per year, with the most expensive non-club seats going for 960 annually.

The Raiders were last in the league in attendance last year, averaging about 46,430 fans per home game and selling out the approximately 63,000-seat stadium just once. Oakland had an extremely low season-ticket base as evidenced by the crowd of 32,218 for a game against Houston on Oct. 3, the smallest in Oakland since 1967.

The Raiders have had just two sellouts the past two seasons. They have had 83 of 128 regular-season games blacked out locally on television because games did not sell out since returning to Oakland in 1995.

"This is a program that's constructive and productive," Trask said. "We're working as a staff to build something together, so when we come out on the other side of this work stoppage we're going to be bigger and better and stronger for it because we have sold more season tickets."

Trask said the plan, which was first reported by USA Today, has been received well by the vast majority of the staff since being implemented in March. It applies to essentially all employees, including coaches, secretaries, executives and equipment staff.

"It's a privilege to work for the Raiders and to work for a National Football League team," Trask said. "Frankly work stoppage or no work stoppage, going out in the community and representing this organization and working to fill the stadium is something all of us should be doing anyway."

The tickets must be paid for one week before the first regular-season game to qualify, so employees don't need to get fans to pay up until they know whether games will be played.

Trask said she has personally sold enough season tickets to hit her target after the first two months of the lockout and has other sales in the works.

While Raiders employees work on selling tickets, the players have made their own plans for offseason workouts. Defensive lineman Richard Seymour and quarterback Jason Campbell have arranged a four-day "Team Passing Camp" next week in Duluth, Ga.

The camp will feature on-field drills, weightlifting, swimming and nutritional counseling. Seymour, who is funding the camp, sent out an email inviting his teammates to attend.

"Men, I hope everyone is well and staying in shape because we are going to outwork everyone we face this season, and it starts right now in the offseason," he wrote.

Seymour signed a 30 million, two-year contract with the Raiders in February, before the start of the league's lockout.

Del Rio: Marshawn showed 'authentic passion' joining hometown Raiders

Del Rio: Marshawn showed 'authentic passion' joining hometown Raiders

ALAMEDA – The Raiders have been focused on the NFL Draft the last few days, and rightfully so. Friday night, however, was the right time to ask about what happened just before.

The Raiders acquired power running back and Oakland native Marshawn Lynch. If he’s close to top form after a year away from the NFL, the Raiders offense will be tough to stop.

He’s a big physical rusher the Raiders were looking for. The Raiders were the team Lynch wants to finish his career representing. The Oakland Tech High grad and Cal alum might be the town’s most popular citizen, someone who consistently gives back to the city he loves.

Lynch was downright giddy after formally signing with the Raiders, greeting everyone in the building with child-like enthusiasm. He got fitted in his Raiders helmet and refused to take it off, wearing it out of the building and the car ride home.

Del Rio loved the energy Lynch brought to the team’s complex, and believes that will carry on while he represents the Silver and Black.

“Authentic passion. That’s what I see,” Del Rio said Friday night. “He’s a homegrown guy. He’s extremely excited about joining this football team and being a part of the Raider Nation. We’re excited to have him.”

Lynch is a bruiser of the highest order, though some may wonder how effective he can be at 31, a year removed from professional football.

“There will be questions about how much is left in his tank, and we’re going to find out,” Del Rio said. “I don’t know that I’ve ever seen anyone else be more excited, more pleased to be joining a team, my team, our team.”

Del Rio understands where Lynch is coming from. The Hayward native longed to be a Raider at some point in his career, but never got the chance.

I told him he was lucky, because I didn’t get a chance to do that as player. I wanted to finish here as a player too. He’s getting that chance and he’s fired up about it.

“He’s a big man, and he plays with the violence that we like and appreciate. I think he’ll look forward to running behind (the Raiders offensive line) and those guys up front.”

Raiders select DT Eddie Vanderdoes in third round of the 2017 NFL Draft

Raiders select DT Eddie Vanderdoes in third round of the 2017 NFL Draft

EDDIE VANDERDOES
Position: Defensive tackle
College: UCLA
Height: 6-foot-3
Weight: 305 pounds
Selection: Third round, No. 88 overall

The Raiders needed depth at defensive tackle. They got some in Eddie Vanderdoes. Whether he helps provide an interior pass rush – he needs improvement in that area -- or joins a run stuffing rotation will be determined in time, but the UCLA product is a solid athlete despite not looking the part. He’s agile with exceptional strength capable of dominating blockers along the interior line.

Good push is needed against the run and pass, especially with Dan Williams released in a salary cap move earlier this month.

Draft analysts say Vanderdoes brings toughness to his position group, and doesn’t mind taking on double teams. He has better pass-rush ability than his stats and shape suggests, assuming he can continue to develop that aspect of the game.

He’s from Auburn, just northeast of Sacramento, and will be happy playing closer to home the next few seasons.

Vanderdoes has an injury history. He missed most of the 2015 season with an ACL tear and didn’t seem to be 100 percent in 2016, when his performance took a dive. If Vanderdoes can return to pre-injury form, the Raiders have a solid player on the roster.

They didn’t produce enough in the middle against the run or pass, and need help to form a rotation capable of slowing opponents down on the interior. He can play on the nose or in three technique if asked, adding strength and versatility to the base package. Creating interior push could help Khalil Mack and Bruce Irvin off the edge.

The Raiders entered this draft needing defensive help, and have added three players on that side of the football. The Silver and Black still need help at linebacker as they move into the draft’s third day, where depth can be added to this group.