Report: Raiders going 'hard' after Carson Palmer

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Report: Raiders going 'hard' after Carson Palmer

The Raiders are "trying hard" to make a deal for Bengals quarterback Carson Palmer, a source familiar with the Raiders' thinking has told Jason Cole of Yahoo Sports.

The source "highly doubted" - those are Cole's words - that Cincinnati owner Mike Brown would deal Palmer, who is holding out in so-called "retirement" until he gets traded.

Palmer, who has been looking for a trade since the offseason, again politely asked Brown for a trade this week, according to one of Cole's sources.

The 31-year-old Palmer, a two-time Pro Bowler, knows Raiders coach Hue Jackson from their days together in Cincinnati. Jackson, the wide receivers coach with the Bengals from 2004-06, "privately told people close to him that he would be interested in Palmer once Brown was willing to deal," according to Cole.

The Raiders, of course, are scrambling after Jason Campbell was likely lost for the season - or at the very least, indefinitely - with a broken collarbone. Kyle Boller is the new starter in Oakland, with rookie Terrelle Pryor currently the only backup.

What about compensation?

In terms of what the Raiders would have to give up for Palmer, Cole speculates that "the Raiders would do well to offer Cincinnati a third-round pick in 2013 that could increase in value to a second- or even first-round pick if Palmer performed well either this year or in 2012."

Part of the problem is that the Raiders don't have a pick in the second, third or fourth round of the 2012 draft due to a series of moves, including the selection of Pryor in the third round of the supplemental draft over the summer.

The trading deadline

One of the major obstacles here is the trade deadline, which is at 1 p.m. local time on Tuesday. Especially once you consider that Palmer was the face of the Bengals franchise and that the Raiders could have to get creative in their trade offer, that doesn't give the teams a lot of time to work out what would be a significant deal for both organizations.

Pro Football Talk's take
A little take on the Palmer situation, from Gregg Rosenthal at ProFootballTalk.com:

"The Raiders are 4-2 and ready to make a run to the playoffs for the first time in nearly a decade. They just lost their starting quarterback, likely for the season. If any team was ever going to make an over-aggressive move including a first round pick, its Oakland in the next two days. ... Other possibilities for the Raiders could include signing David Garrard or trying to trade for Kyle Orton. Both of those moves make more sense to us because the cost will be less."

Report: Fortress group submits Oakland stadium plan to NFL

Report: Fortress group submits Oakland stadium plan to NFL

OAKLAND -- The investment group seeking to build a new stadium to keep the Raiders in Oakland has submitted a formal plan to the NFL for the first time.

A person familiar with the deal said Tuesday that the plan was submitted by the Fortress Investment Group within the past 10 days. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the submission was not made public. Sports Business Daily first reported the submission.

Fortress is working with NFL Hall of Famer Ronnie Lott on a plan to build a stadium in Oakland to replace the outdated Coliseum. Oakland city officials gave Fortress the right to develop a plan for a stadium and new development at the current Coliseum site.

The NFL dismissed the initial plan that was made public in December but Fortress has been in discussions with the league the past two months to try to answer their concerns. The person said the plan recently submitted is "fundamentally" the same as the one previously made public but does clarify some questions raised by the league.

Fortress and Oakland officials are hopeful of having a viable option to present to owners before they meet in late March for a possible vote on whether to allow the Raiders to move to Las Vegas, where the team has struck a deal for a 65,000-seat domed stadium.

The team also needs to find a funding replacement for casino magnate Sheldon Adelson, who withdrew a $650 million pledge for the $1.9 billion Las Vegas project. The Raiders recently told the stadium authority board in Las Vegas that financing will not be an issue.

The state of Nevada has committed $750 million to the project, while the Raiders and NFL would pay the remaining $500 million if three-quarters of the league's owners approve a move.

 

Carr on possible Raiders extension: 'I don't want to play anywhere else'

Carr on possible Raiders extension: 'I don't want to play anywhere else'

The Raiders hope to extend franchise quarterback Derek Carr’s contract this offseason. That sits well with No. 4.

He doesn’t want to play anywhere else.

A long-term contract extension is a surefire way to make that happen.

“They know how I feel,” Carr said Tuesday in an interview with Sirius XM Mad Dog Radio’s Adam Schein. “I’m a Raider. I’m a Raider for life. I don’t want to play anywhere else. When I got drafted, this is where I wanted to be anyway. I don’t want to go anywhere, ever. They told me they don’t want me to go anywhere, ever. Now it’s about two people who want to be together, and how do we make that happen? We’ll see.”

Extending a quarterback can be complicated with huge numbers in total dollars and guaranteed funds. The player wants fair market value. For a young talent like Carr, that’s a lot. The team wants a happy quarterback without handicapping the team long-term. That’s especially true of a Raiders club planning a big-money extension for Khalil Mack at some point, while retaining other key members of their young foundation.

Carr will be the first key extension in a cluster of them. It’s something the Raiders have planned for a while now, and expressed to Carr’s camp.

“I think they’ve been talking even since through the season, keeping a line of communication together and keeping in touch,” Carr said. “Now that it’s getting on down the line and getting serious, I think that they’re trying to fugure out a way to (get) it done. If we can do that, great. If not, I can assure you I’m just going to be out there playing football.”

Outsiders have pegged Andrew Luck’s six-year, $122 million contract with Indianapolis that contained $47 million fully guaranteed at signing – much more is guaranteed for injury -- as a benchmark.

Carr is ready to enter a contract year, but said he didn’t have a deadline for when a deal had to get done. It might help the Raiders to have it complete by the start of free agency on March 9, which would give the team greater clarity regarding this offseason’s salary cap space. That doesn’t mean it will happen then, but an extension at some point seems like a slam dunk.

"If it happens, that’ll be cool. That money’s going to help a lot of people. I’m not going to change my attire or outfits. I’m still going to wear the same clothes I’ve had since college. I’m still going to wear UGG slippers out and my wife will shake her head at me.

“…The biggest thing for me is that I don’t want it to distract my teammates. They know me, that I really don’t care. I just like to play ball, but I don’t want people asking them questions. I would want it done so they don’t have to deal with it, but I’m always going to do what’s best for my family and what’s best for the team all in one. If we can all look at each other and say we feel good about something, then we can walk away and focus on football. …I want to play ball, and I want to do it in a silver and black jersey.”