Raiders

Routt garnering immediate attention

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Routt garnering immediate attention

Stanford Routt, who was released by the Raiders Thursday, might not stay unemployed for long. A day later, the seven-year NFL veteran has trips planned to visit the Buffalo Bills and Tennessee Titans, according to a report by ESPN.

Routt's agent William Vann McElroy was quoted saying, "Buffalo has him flying in on Sunday for a Monday visit."

In the aftermath of GM Reggie McKenzie saying the Raiders possessed a number of "out of whack" contracts, he made a bold move to cut the high-paid cornerback, who would have earned a guaranteed 5 million if he was on the roster Friday.

GUTIERREZ: McKenzie shows prowess in showing Routt the door

Routt, 28, was the most penalized player in the NFL, drawing 17 flags. His burn rate rose from among the league's best at 39.4 in 2011 to a pedestrian 47.4.

Vann McElroy took no time attempting to deflect reasons for the dismissal, claiming what he thinks what "happened is you have a guy who is determined to make this team his own now. Stanford was an Al Davis guy. He loved the kid. The only reason why this came at this point is because Stanford would have had 5 million in guaranteed salary if he was on the roster Friday. Trust me there will be other quality guys cut too, but whatever you think, Stanford is a great bump-and-run cornerback with great speed."

Routt's addition to the free agent cornerbacks makes it a deep field. Tennessee's Cortland Finnegan, Atlanta's Brent Grimes, Kansas City's Brandon Carr, New Orleans' Tracy Porter and the 49ers' Carlos Rogers are among the top tier, followed by New York Giant's Terrell Thomas, Detroit's Eric Wright, and New York Giants' Aaron Ross.

Raiders send thoughts and prayers to Mexico after devastating earthquake

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AP

Raiders send thoughts and prayers to Mexico after devastating earthquake

A catastrophic 7.1 magnitude earthquake hit central Mexico on Tuesday. At least 139 people have died as buildings all around the affected area have collapsed.

The Raiders, who played the Texans in Mexico City last season and will face the Patriots there on Nov. 19, issued a statement regarding the earthquake.

"The Raiders have the people of Mexico City and the surrounding areas in our thoughts and prayers following today's earthquake. Mexico City is a special place for the Raider Nation and the most heartfelt sentiments of the Raiders family go out to all of our Mexican neighbors in this time of need."

The Raiders did not have an immediate comment on the status of the game against the Patriots which will be played at Estadio Azteca. According to media reports, the stadium sustained damage during the earthquake.

Expect Raiders-to-Vegas to hit snags, not roadblocks

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AP

Expect Raiders-to-Vegas to hit snags, not roadblocks

There have been whispers at the edges of the Oakland Raiders-to-Las Vegas deal that kinks are beginning to show in the ongoing negotiations between the team and the city and state.
 
Kinks, though. Not insurmountable problems.
 
Rumors in both Oakland and Las Vegas that the Raiders have been examining the possibility of extending their temporary lease with the Coliseum to include the years 2020, 2021 and 2022 have picked up steam in the last several days, but the issues that have caused this impetus are described by sources at both ends of the deal as “not yet large enough to cause a real problem.”
 
As one source said, “The casinos want this (Raider deal to get done), and the casinos get what they want.”
 
The main sticking point is negotiations between team, the city, the state and the University of Nevada Las Vegas, which just hired a new athletic director, Desiree Reed-Francois, who is an expert on facilities use and once worked for the Raiders and the NFL Management Council as a legal assistant. She has been adamant about issues of stadium use (the Raiders and Rebels are to share the stadium), and the Raiders apparently have been playing standard NFL hardball on their part.
 
One source said that may not be the only issue involved, but that it is a considerable one – considerable that is, if you list the issues at hand. “Everyone wants the deal done, but they don’t want UNLV to get muscled too badly,” he said.
 
But the issue is enough that the Raisders have inquired about 2020-2, and Scott McKibben, the executive director of the Oakland stadium authority, told the Las Vegas Sun last week that he would be willing to negotiate a lease extension “for 2019 and beyond, if necessary.”
 
McKibben told the newspaper that the city currently loses money when the Raiders play at home, and would want changes in the current lease provisions for negotiations on an extension to proceed. Talks have not yet progressed because construction on the Las Vegas site have not yet begun.
 
The reason given by most experts as to why the stadium has not yet begun its construction phase is that any work done before there is an agreement would happen on the Raiders’ dime, not the city’s or state’s, and any potential liability would be the team’s to assume as well.

Thus, according to sources, the Raiders are talking about a lease extension in Oakland as a leverage play against Las Vegas.
 
Thus, we have your standard game of multi-headed chicken being played out in two states by two cities and two athletic organizations that have stalled the team’s expected relocation, at least a bit.
 
But, as that source said at the top of this piece, “The casinos want this,” and in Las Vegas, the house always wins. It’s just one more Raideresque complication in a litany of them.