Terrelle Pryor, Al Davis’ last gamble, now someone else’s issue

Terrelle Pryor, Al Davis’ last gamble, now someone else’s issue
April 21, 2014, 6:00 pm
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Pryor, like most Raider quarterbacks in the post-Gannon era, worked with a substandard roster and an expansion-level organization, in that the post-Davis brain trust has spent two years trying to reconstruct the operation.
Ray Ratto

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Al Davis’ last philosophical talent acquisition, Terrelle Pryor, has moved on to colder, wetter and indisputably happier climes.

Pryor has been traded to Seattle for some odd bric-a-brac (a seventh rounder, although because of nine compensatory picks after Seattle’s choice). There he can serve as Russell Wilson’s backup, or backup backup depending upon how you view Tarvaris Jackson – a stylistic choice by head coach Pete Carroll that the concept of the modern mobile quarterback has to be a commitment rather than just a happenstance.

And the Oakland Raiders have the fifth pick in the NFL draft with which to create a new Pryor down the road. Draw your own Manziel-like conclusions.

Pryor, like most Raider quarterbacks in the post-Gannon era, worked with a substandard roster and an expansion-level organization, in that the post-Davis brain trust has spent two years trying to reconstruct the operation. Against those central truths, even a more technically accomplished Pryor stood little chance of success.

In Seattle, his path to starting again is blocked by a Super Bowl champion. Thus, he goes to a team that does not have to rush him into a savior’s role. The Seahawks thinkers can sharpen his technique while enhancing his gifts without having to do so under the metaphorical gun.

And the Raiders are still left with that No. 5, which probably will not be a quarterback only because there seems to be no draftable quarterback worthy of such organizational trust. They have addressed other needs with an active free agency splash, including starting quarterback Matt Schaub, but the longer term remains nebulous. General manager Reggie McKenzie and head coach Dennis Allen reluctantly gave Pryor a look, but quickly hooked him when his shortcomings meshed with those of his teammates.

Now Pryor has moved on to a more stable if less noticeable career place, and the last real talent gamble of Al Davis’ life is now someone else’s issue. The Terrelle Pryor story may still be a success, but it won’t be one in Oakland.