What, a blown call? Raiders fans can relate

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What, a blown call? Raiders fans can relate

Forgive the denizens of Raider Nation if they give a collective sigh and a hearty "so what" to the recent botched ending of Monday Night Football by the replacement referees.What, a team as celebrated and as venerated as the Green Bay Packers got hosed by an egregious call that cost them a game? Welcome to our world, was being shouted from the mountain tops of Silver and Blackdom.REWIND: NFL releases statement on Packers-Seahawks blown call
Hey, it's not paranoia if they're out to get you, right? At least, that's how the saying goes. And it got me to thinking of calls that have have gone against the Raiders. No, not the ham-and-egger numbers like San Diego's Vincent Jackson rolling the ball forward and it being called an illegal forward pass in 2006. Or the Louis Murphy touchdown catch that wasn't in 2009, against those same Chargers.We're talking all-time greats that altered the course of pro football history and have Raiders fans thinking they should have at least five more Lombardi Trophies. So without further adoThe Otis Taylor One-Foot-Inbounds Catch
It's Jan. 4, 1970, the last AFL game ever played. The Raiders are playing host to Kansas City at the Coliseum and the winner would go on to face Minnesota in Super Bowl IV.The Raiders had already played in Super Bowl II, lost the AFL title to Joe Namath a year later and on this day were locked in a 7-7 game early in the second half, with the Chiefs at their own two-yard line facing a daunting third-and-14. But Chiefs quarterback Len Dawson spied Otis Taylor down the left sideline, just beyond Raiders cornerback Willie Brown, and hurled it.Taylor made a remarkable one-handed catch for a 35-yard gain, even if he only had one foot inbounds. Which would be fine in college but not in pro ball. The Chiefs would continue their drive and score what would prove to be the winning touchdown in an eventual 17-7 victory before going on to throttle the Vikings in the last Super Bowl played before the AFL-NFL merger.The Immaculate Reception
It's Dec. 23, 1972, the divisional round of the AFC playoffs and Ken Stabler had scored on a 30-yard run with 77 seconds to play at Three Rivers Stadium to give the Raiders a 7-3 lead.And with the Steelers looking at a fourth-and-10 from their own 40 with 22 seconds to play, what happened next will be debated until the end of time.Terry Bradshaw heaved a pass downfield toward Frenchy Fuqua but Jack Tatum arrived just as the ball did, resulting in a violent collision. The ball popped up and back, where an onrushing Franco Harris plucked it out of the air -- or did it hit the turf first? -- and rumbled in for the game-winning score.The question, though, was off which player did the ball ricochet? If it was Fuqua, then Harris' catch would have been illegal. If it bounded off Tatum, then the play was clean.There was a lengthy discussion as to whether the play was a TD or not and the refs called the supervisor of NFL officiating from a dugout phone to confer. There were also tales of the refs calling the police department to ask if there was enough protection from Steelers fans if they ruled it an incompletion. Shockingly (add sarcasm font here) It was ruled a touchdown and the Steelers had their first-ever playoff victory. They would go on and lose the AFC championship to undefeated Miami but Pittsburgh would go on to win four Super Bowls in the decade.The Rob Lytle Fumble
It's Jan. 1, 1978 and the defending Super Bowl champion Raiders are in the AFC title game at division rival Denver. The Broncos already lead 7-3 and have a first-and-goal at the two-yard line midway though the third quarter.Broncos running back Rob Lytle dives into the pile and is stopped midair by Jack Tatum and the ball pops out. Mike McCoy scoops it up and is gone, 10-7, Raiders, right?Um, no. Lytle was ruled to have been down, that his forward progress had been stopped, before the ball squirted free, despite replays showing that not to be the case. The Broncos go on to score and hold on to win, 20-17, before getting pummeled in Super Bowl XII by the Dallas Cowboys.The Siragusa Flop
It's Jan. 14, 2001, early in the second quarter of the AFC championship game at the Coliseum, and Baltimore had just taken a 7-0 lead on a 96-yard pass play from Trent Dilfer to Shannon Sharpe. And on the Raiders' ensuing play, Rich Gannon throws an incompletion to James Jett and 330-pound (on a light day) nose tackle Tony Siragusa tosses Rich Gannon to the ground before coming off the figurative top rope with a literal body splash that would make Vince McMahon smile. Both literally and figuratively.No flag is thrown.Instead, Gannon writhes on the ground and is knocked out of the game for the rest of the half. In comes Bobby Hoying ,who promptly throws an interception that leads to a Ravens field goal. Gannon makes a game effort to return in the second half but is obviously in pain still and struggling and replaced again by Hoying. Ballgame.The Ravens, with a defense reminiscent of the 1985 Bears, go on to beat the New York Giants in Super Bowl XXXV and the Raiders, who go ultra-conservative with Hoying under center, are left to ruminate another missed call. Until the mother of all hose jobs goes down in the New England snow a year and five days later.The Tuck Rule
It's Jan. 19, 2002, the final game at Foxboro Stadium and it's a winter wonderland for this AFC divisional playoff game, being played in a blizzard.The Raiders are clinging to a 13-10 lead with 1:50 to play and New England is at the Raiders' 42-yard line on first-and-10 when Tom Brady drops back to pass. Charles Woodson comes in on a corner blitz, hammers Brady, the ball pops loose, Greg Biekert recovers and the Raiders are headed to their second straight AFC title game.Then, it happens. Because the play occurred with less than two minutes remaining, it was automatically reviewed by the Review Assistant and the Tuck Rule is invoked, despite there being no clearcut evidence to overturn the original ruling on the field of fumble. The Patriots retain possession, drive to the Oakland 28-yard line and Adam Vinatieri boots a 45-yard field goal through the snowflakes to tie the game with 27 seconds left in regulation.The Raiders sit on the ball on their ensuing possession and never see the ball again. The Patriots win the toss, drive to the Raiders' five-yard line and Vinatieri's 23-yard field goal not only ends the game, but jumpstarts New England's dynasty of the new millennium. Helped, of course, by the Tuck Rule and SpyGate. But that's a different topic for a different day.From the Raiders' perspective, the Tuck Rule Game was Gruden's last as Raiders coach as Oakland would not see him until a year later in Super Bowl XXXVII, when Gruden's Tampa Bay Buccaneers walloped the Raiders, 48-21, and Oakland has not been back to the playoffs since.

Raiders head to NFL owners meetings looking for Las Vegas approval

Raiders head to NFL owners meetings looking for Las Vegas approval

PHOENIX -- All signs point to the Raiders being approved for relocation to Las Vegas. It could happen as early as Monday, when the topic will be discussed at the NFL owners meetings in Phoenix. It could be Tuesday. Or in May. Or at any point in a conference call.

The timing is less important than the ultimate outcome. The when is uncertain. The what seems likely, though not guaranteed, at this stage.

The Raiders need 24 of 32 approval votes to relocate and start construction on new digs.

The Raiders have presented a solid application to the NFL, centered on a stadium proposal in Las Vegas that includes $750 million in public funds for stadium construction. Bank of America, who is financing the project, is expected to loan the Raiders money to complete a financing plan that includes the public contribution and $500 million from the team and the NFL.

The Sports Business Journal reported on Sunday that the estimated stadium cost has dropped to $1.7 billion, and will receive $200 million in infrastructure improvements not included in their construction contribution.

League sources continue to say approval is expected. There is great confidence within the Raiders organization a vote will go their way.

Some issues remain, though none are significant roadblocks. A stadium lease hasn’t been finalized and a site hasn’t been formally announced – it’s reportedly set for a spot just off the Las Vegas Strip near Russell Road – so approval would likely come with conditions that could be met in time.

The Raiders worked a sweetheart deal that mines significant money from the public. They don’t have investors with direct ties to gambling. And, as important as anything else, the NFL doesn’t believe Oakland has a viable plan to keep the Raiders in an otherwise attractive, booming market.

That includes the latest proposal from the Oakland and financial partner Fortress Investments announced on Friday that makes certain concessions aimed at getting the Raiders back to the table.

The Silver and Black haven’t worked with East Bay officials in more than as year, as they’ve shifted complete focus to their Las Vegas quest.

The revised Oakland plan didn’t move the needle, a league executive said. That point was made crystal clear in a letter NFL commissioner Roger Goodell sent to Oakland mayor Libby Schaaf.

“The material that we reviewed earlier today confirms certain information that had previously been communicated orally, such as a willingness to bring bank financing to a stadium project, and a proposed valuation of the land at the Coliseum site,” Goodell wrote in a letter obtained by Bay Area News Group. “It also confirms that key issues that we have identified as threshold considerations are simply not resolvable in a reasonable time. In that respect, the information sent today does not present a proposal that is clear and specific, actionable in a reasonable timeframe, and free of major contingencies.”

That virtually eliminates the prospect of Oakland planting doubt in NFL owners’ minds heading into a pivotal discussion on the topic Monday at the Arizona Biltmore hotel.

It’s possible the stadium and finance committee will make a formal recommendation on the Raiders application to relocate. That could precede a vote, and generally holds significant weight among undecided owners.

A league source said the new Oakland plan will be a talking point, though it may not be viewed in a flattering light. That’s especially true in light of Goodell’s letter.

“At this date, there remains no certainty regarding how the site will be fully developed, or the specific and contractually-defined nature of the participation by Fortress or other parties,” Goodell wrote. “In addition, the long-term nature of the commitment to the A’s remains a significant complication and the resolution of that issue remains unknown. Other significant uncertainties, which we have previously identified, remain unaddressed. We had hoped that the past two years would have allowed both of us to develop a viable project.”

Peterson blasts report over salary demands, outlines main objectives

Peterson blasts report over salary demands, outlines main objectives

Adrian Peterson played defense on Friday night.

Hours after a report suggesting that the four-time All-Pro running back was still a free agent due to salary demands, the former Viking posted a lengthy statement on Instagram along with a video of his running an agility drill.

"YOU CANT BELIEVE EVERYTHING YOU READ OR HEAR PEOPLE. The last thing I'm worried about is playing ball this coming season ... that WILL HAPPEN! It's not all about the money as EVERYONE is speculating here lately. You'd THINK these analysts spoke to me directly. When you don't know what's going on people will say anything to create or make a story! How prideful is it for me to put out ... I won't play for anything less than 8 million! But see, when you don't know a person or what they stand for it's easy to paint YOUR OWN PICTURE. Unfortunately, this is the world we live in! Here is something Straight from the horse's mouth ... finding the best fit & helping a team in a major way win a championship is my main objective! I'm in no rush. Let me eliminate questions or speculation as to why... I believe whole heartedly my God will land me right where I need to be to accomplish what I've asked from him PERIOD"

Early in the free agency period, the Raiders were linked to Peterson, but nothing came of those rumors.

The Raiders, in need of a feature back after Latavius Murray signed with the Vikings, are reportedly pursuing the possibility of luring Oakland-native Marshawn Lynch out of retirement.

Peterson was scheduled to make $18 million in 2017, but the Vikings declined to exercise his contract, making him a free agent. The 2012 NFL MVP turned 32 on March 21 and played in just three games in 2016 due to a major knee injury.

According to the ESPN report, Peterson was looking for a contract that paid him over $8 million in the first year of the deal.

YOU CANT BELIEVE EVERYTHING YOU READ OR HEAR PEOPLE. The last thing I'm worried about is playing ball this coming season ... that WILL HAPPEN! It's not all about the money as EVERYONE is speculating here lately. You'd THINK these analysts spoke to me directly. When you don't know what's going on people will say anything to create or make a story! How prideful is it for me to put out ... I won't play for anything less than 8 million! But see, when you don't know a person or what they stand for it's easy to paint YOUR OWN PICTURE. Unfortunately, this is the world we live in! Here is something Straight from the horse's mouth ... finding the best fit & helping a team in a major way win a championship is my main objective! I'm in no rush. Let me eliminate questions or speculation as to why... I believe whole heartedly my God will land me right where I need to be to accomplish what I've asked from him PERIOD

A post shared by Adrian L Peterson (@adrianpeterson) on