Who should get the next Oakland stadium?

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Who should get the next Oakland stadium?

When the Coliseum complex was designed in 1960, community leaders saw it as a magnet to lure professional sports franchises, in helping build a unique identity for the East Bay. By 1966, the Raiders had moved in. Two years later the A's relocated out west. And once the nomadic Warriors finally settled into the arena, it was a full house, and a mission accomplished beside the freshly paved Nimitz freeway.Coincidentally; here we are more than 40 years later, traffic on 880 is terrible, and all 3 teams are desperately planning their exit. The Warriors are clearly inspired to change area codes, but for the A's and Raiders, it's the primary need to replace an outdated facility. When you consider other multi-purpose stadiums of the same era, the Coliseum has outlasted all, and enjoyed a successful lifespan as the final remaining NFL-MLB venue.Shea Stadium: Opened 1964 - Closed 2008
Atlanta Fulton County Stadium: Opened 1965 - Closed 1997
Astrodome: Opened 1965 - Closed 1999
Oakland Coliseum: Opened 1966
Busch Memorial Stadium: Opened 1966 - Closed 2005
Riverfront Stadium: Opened 1970 - Closed 2002
Three Rivers Stadium: Opened 1970 - Closed 2000
Veterans Stadium: Opened 1971 - Closed 2003
Kingdome: Opened 1976 - Closed 2000At this week's NFL Fall Meeting in Chicago, Raiders Owner Mark Davis didn't hold back, calling the Coliseum's sightlines "absolutely terrible" for football and deeming the building beyond renovation. With exception to the the newer "Mount Davis" portion, there's not a whole lot of argument from me or anyone else on these points.NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell backed this up by saying: "I think there is a very strong recognition that they need a new stadium. That's going to be something they have to have in that community to be successful going forward." Sure was nice of the Commissioner to gain attention and grease some wheels at the political level. And again, I don't think you'll find too many folks in the 510, 707 or 925 who disagree.But herein lies the hypothetical question: if the City of Oakland is realistically only able to handle one stadium project at a time, who should get the priority... the A's or Raiders?The seniority card goes to the Raiders for being in Oakland first... but is probably taken away for the dozen years they left for Los Angeles.The inconvenience card definitely goes to the A's in dealing with the 1996 monstrosity of concrete that still lives beyond their outfield fence. The logistics card goes to the A's who would utilize a new venue approximately 71 more times per year than their football counterparts.Anyone can understand and respect the Raiders position, as they begin to wave a flag and get minds thinking about a new football venue. But the simultaneous nature of these needs should favor the A's. They have been gracious in sharing a home the majority of their Oakland existence, and deserve the first attention city government can give. Who do you think should get Oakland's next stadium? Log in, and add your comments below.

McCoy, Bills run game to 'throw the gauntlet' at Raiders defensive front

McCoy, Bills run game to 'throw the gauntlet' at Raiders defensive front

ALAMEDA – Rex Ryan coined the phrase “ground and pound” when he was head coach of the New York Jets, reflected his desire to run often and run vertically with power. He’s with a different team, but the term traveled with him.

Ryan like to control on the ground. 

It’s no surprise Ryan’s Buffalo Bills are the NFL’s best rushing attack. They average 157.4 yards per game on the ground, a massive total led by lead back LeSean McCoy and speedy quarterback Tyrod Taylor. The Bills average 5.3 yards per carry and run a ton, nearly 30 times per game. That’s second only to Dallas. And, to top it all off, they’ve only fumbled twice running the football.

The numbers are awesome, but the ground and pound may not fit. The Buffalo Bills do it all running the football, meaning the Raiders defense must be ready for anything during Sunday’s game at Oakland Coliseum.

“They really do everything that I can think of that I’ve ever seen in the run game, they have it one form or fashion,” head coach Jack Del Rio said. “They basically throw the gauntlet at you. They’ve got a formation thing and they see how you want to play it. Then they’ve got a series of plays they get to and they’re very good at it. No. 1 in the league, and that’s saying something.”

They have a feature back in McCoy, who revived his career in Buffalo. He has 819 yards and nine touchdowns through 11 games, averaging 5.2 yards per carry. He has exceeded 100 yards seven times over two seasons in Buffalo. In those games, the Bills are 7-0.

That might spell trouble for the Raiders. They rank 26th with 116.9 rushing yards allowed per game, and have given up a triple digit total in five of the last six games. While those totals aren’t great, the Raiders have won five straight.

That’s all that matters, though the Bills rushing ways might impact the final result. The Raiders have fallen victim to misdirection and schematic quirks, especially off the edge. They’ve been better in those areas lately, though chunk plays are still a problem. They’ve given up seven plays of 20-plus yards and three of 40 or more.

Stopping the run will be harder without Stacy McGee and Darius Latham in the interior rotation. That puts an onus on Dan Williams, Denico Autry and Justin Ellis to take more snaps and plug gaps in the middle. Stopping the run always involves discipline and sure tackling.

Doing that will be important, considering the Bills rank dead last in passing offense. That makes slowing the run imperative.

Taylor is the team’s second-leading rusher, with 639 yards on 6.3 yards per carry. That led Khalil Mack to say they have “two rushers in the backfield.”

Even so, it all starts with stopping Shady.

“McCoy is a type of runner, he can start to the right and he could end up on the left,” defensive coordinator Ken Norton Jr. said. “It kind of reminds you of the old days, Barry Sanders. He could be anywhere. It’s important each player who’s involved in the defense and in charge of the gap, you have to be solid, you have to sound and you have to be disciplined and understand that we’re all connected. Everybody plays together. Not one guy tackles him. The whole unit is responsible for the running game.”

Injury report: Raiders interior D-line ailing; Amerson says he's ready

Injury report: Raiders interior D-line ailing; Amerson says he's ready

ALAMEDA – The Raiders interior defensive line is ailing, with tackles Darius Latham and Stacy McGee ruled out of Sunday’s game against the Buffalo Bills.

They were formally designated unavailable Friday on the team’s official injury report.

The timing isn’t great from a Raiders perspective. They’re facing the NFL’s best rushing attack, and will need others to play more snaps and stop Buffalo’s run game effectively.

Dan Williams and Justin Ellis are effective run stoppers and must carry an increased workload. Jihad Ward and Denico Autry will also work extensively in the middle.

While a significant hamstring injury will forced the Raiders to place DJ Hayden on injured reserve, David Amerson expects to be back after missing last game with a knee injury.

He was limited in practice all week and is considered questionable, but feels good enough to go.

“I feel good, man,” Amerson said. “I'm ready to get back out there and compete.”

They’ll need him and Sean Smith to anchor on the outside, with TJ Carrie now stepping into the slot role.

The Raiders will also be without reserve edge rusher Shilique Calhoun, out a second game after having a procedure on his knee.

Starting interior linebackers Perry Riley and Malcolm Smith are considered questionable with hamstring strains.

Quarterback Derek Carr was a full participant every practice this week and was taken off the injury report. He threw a second straight day without a glove.

Bills head coach Rex Ryan said receiver Sammy Watkins will play on Sunday against the Raiders despite a broken foot. Local reporters have suggested his snap count may be down.

Buffalo will miss cornerback Ronald Darby and receivers Percy Harvin and Robert Woods, who were ruled out with injury.

Bills Injury Report
Out

WR Robert Woods (knee), CB Ronald Darby (concussion), WR Percy Harvin (illness)
Questionable
OLB Lorenzo Alexander (ankle), OT Cordy Glenn (back), S James Ihedigbo (ankle), WR Sammy Watkins (foot), TE Charles Clay (knee), G Richie Incognito (neck), DT Marcell Dareus (abdominal), RB Mike Gillislee (hamstring), S Sergio Brown (wrist), G John Miller (shoulder), WR Marquise Goodwin (wrist)

Raiders Injury Report
Out
LB Shilique Calhoun (knee), DT Stacy McGee (ankle), DT Darius Latham (ankle)
Questionable
CB David Amerson (knee), WR Michael Crabtree (ankle), C Rodney Hudson (knee), RB Latavius Murray (ankle), OL Kelechi Osemele (knee), LB Perry Riley Jr. (hamstring), LB Malcolm Smith (hamstring)