Yeah, but: Knapp hiring has many points, counter-points

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Yeah, but: Knapp hiring has many points, counter-points

The Raiders reboot is in full effect.It's no secret that I have endorsed -- heartily -- new Raiders coach Dennis Allen keeping offensive coordinator Al Saunders in that same role because, well, it made sense. Probably too much sense.The offense was a bright spot for Oakland last season and Saunders provided the high-powered gameplans, even as Hue Jackson called the plays. Still, a little continuity on that side of the ball, a full offseason program with quarterback Carson Palmer, and a (cross your fingers, Raider Nation) healthy Darren McFadden with Saunders overseeing it all seemed like the right call.
And yetAllen has chosen to go in a different direction. Really, a radically different direction. His choice of Greg Knapp as offensive coordinator harkens some of the darkest memories of recent Raiders time. And the offense will undergo another facelift, along with the defense and special teams units.And while it has created a firestorm on the internet by furious Raiders fans, there seems to be an inherent point-counterpoint to Knapp's return. A whole slew of "Yeah, buts" slinking around the streets of Silver and Blackdom.This is not to criticize the hire as a bad fit; it's just that there was seemingly a better fit already on staff in Saunders, who is still under contract. All of which is explains, while I don't necessarily agree with the choice of replacing Saunders with Knapp, I understand it. Besides, why tell an incoming head coach he can pick and choose his entire staff if it's not really true? A guy has to feel comfortable with his assistants and trust them, no?As such, five such "Yeah, buts" to chew onKnapp already had his shot as the O.C. here and it failed miserably then, right?Yeah, but you try and be an effective offensive coordinator in the middle of the maelstrom of negativity that existed between Al Davis and Lane Kiffin. You want to talk dysfunction? Thar she blows. Or have you also forgotten the carousel of quarterbacks with which Knapp had to deal in 2007 -- Josh McCown? Daunte Culpepper? Andrew Walter? And yes, JaMarcus Russell as a rookie. I'll give you this much, though, things got so bad a year later Knapp had his playcalling duties stripped and given to Tom Cable. True, numbers don't lie. But again, imagine trying to work in that environment. I remember thinking Knapp would be the runaway choice to be the interim coach in the wake of Kiffin's firing, only to hear rumblings that Knapp wanted nothing to do with it and wanted out. Enter the Cable guy, to be followed by HueJax City.Knapp had Darren McFadden as a rookie, and wasted his skill set then, no?Yeah, but remember, Knapp was the O.C. when Run DMC ran over Kansas City for 164 yards on 21 carries and scored a touchdown in his second-ever NFL game. Knapp's West Coast Offense might actually benefit the hybrid McFadden's skill setso long as he can stay healthy (an annual big if). The emphasis then was on developing Russell and by the time Cable took over the offense, McFadden was being used almost exclusively between the tackles in Cable's zone-blocking scheme. What a waste, as he is best in space. No doubt McFadden blossomed in his third pro season, under Jackson. The key was Jackson actually asking McFadden what kind of plays he liked to run and then implemented them. Knapp needs to take a cue from Hue on that point.What about re-training Carson Palmer? He's not a true West Coast Offense quarterback.Yeah, but well, you got me there. CP3 is anything but a Captain Checkdown-type of QB in the mold of Jason Campbell. Still, a dink here and a dunk there might benefit Palmer, who prefers the quick strike downfield. His deft touch on long throws should be able to translate to the flat, right? And even if Palmer is an old dog (in QB years), he is willing to learn a new trick or two, so long as it translates to success. And with a new offensive coordinator coming in, he was going to have to learn a new "language" anyway. At least this go-round, Palmer has an entire offseason to digest a new system and get on the same page with a receiving corps that did not exactly welcome him with open arms last fall.Wait, Allen said the offense would be up-tempo, like the New Orleans Saints' offense. Knapp's offenses over the years have been anything but explosive, more like churning the butter.Yeah, but he hasn't had this many weapons at his disposal, either. Again, it all depends upon health, but look what he did last year in Houston, getting third-string rookie T.J. Yates to not only survive but thrive in the playoff race and win a playoff game. Yes, I know Knapp did not run the Texans' offense, that he was merely the QB coach. But he did do a helluva job with Yates as a teacher, of sorts. And sure, Knapp might get too run-heavy at times, but his Atlanta teams led the league in rushing in 2004, 2005 and 2006. And when he had more all-around talent across the Bay, his 49ers teams ranked fourth, eighth and fifth in total offense in 2001, 2002 and 2003, respectively. Talent makes coaches look smart. Lack of talent? Look up the rankings of the 2007 and 2008 Raiders offenses and the 2009 Seattle Seahawks. You get the picture.I'm sure Knapp is a nice guy, but this feels like a retread hire and I thought the Raiders were in full reboot mode looking to the future.Yeah, but The coaching fraternity is thisclose to be a good old boy network, meaning just about every coach out there is a retread. They live a vagabond existence. At least Knapp understands the dark belly of working for the Raiders. And with a regime change, things are decidedly different. The Raiders have entered a new era while paying respect to the past and, obviously, Knapp wants to be here. Most likely he feels a sense of unfinished business in Oakland, much as did Saunders. What it all comes down to is this -- Allen has made his choice of Knapp and there's nothing you can do about it. Nothing but come up with points why he should not be here, and counterpoints as to why he should. And vice-versa. And try not to drive yourself mad, literally or figuratively.

Week after signing with Vikings, ex-Raiders RB Murray undergoes surgery

Week after signing with Vikings, ex-Raiders RB Murray undergoes surgery

A week after signing a deal with the Vikings, former Raiders running back Latavius Murray has undergone ankle surgery.

The Vikings made the announcement Wednesday afternoon.

Minnesota issued the following statement regarding the surgery:

"Vikings RB Latavius Murray had successful ankle surgery today. The surgery was performed by Dr. Bob Anderson in Charlotte, North Carolina. We were aware of the required surgery prior to signing Latavius on March 16. Latavius is expected to fully recover and be available for training camp."

Murray's deal with the Vikings is reported worth $15 million over three years, but can reportedly be voied after the first year.

Drafted in the sixth round of the 2013 NFL Draft, Murray became the Raiders' primary running back midway through the 2015 season. In his three years in Oakland, Murray carried the ball 543 times for 2,278 yards and 12 touchdowns. He was named to the Pro Bowl in 2015.

Ex-Raiders tight end signs deal with Jaguars

Ex-Raiders tight end signs deal with Jaguars

After four seasons with the Raiders, tight end Mychal Rivera is on the move.

The 2013 sixth-round pick has signed a deal with the Jacksonville Jaguars, the team announced.

News of an agreement between the two sides was first reported by ESPN. Terms of the deal were not immediately known.

After playing a prominent role in Oakland his first two seasons, Rivera saw his numbers decrease in 2015 and 2016. This past season, he caught just 18 passes for 192 yards and one touchdown.

In his time with the Raiders, the Tennessee alum caught a total of 146 passes for 1,413 yards and 10 touchdowns.

The Raiders signed free agent tight end Jared Cook last week to go with incumbents Clive Walford and Lee Smith.

Shortly after the deal was announced, Rivera took to Instagram to thank Raiders fans.

"Thank You #RaiderNation. It was an honor to wear silver and black for the first 4 years of my NFL career. A kid from LA was drafted to the Bay...and God made a way! Wins, Losses, Blood, Sweat, & Tears made me the player I am today. Better than ever. The values that embody what it is to be a Raider will stick with me for life," Rivera wrote.