Ratto: AP top 25 rankings (112810)

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Ratto: AP top 25 rankings (112810)

Nov. 28, 2010RATTO ARCHIVE
NOV. 21 RANKINGS
POLLS PAGE
Ray Ratto
CSNBayArea.com

Each week, the Associated Press college football ballot shrinks a few teams, and now is down to maybe four that really matter. But we soldier on, because we are faithful and devoted and because it kills a Sunday morning that might otherwise be spent interacting with the family. Our man's poll, with salient abuse as required:

1 (3)
Oregon Arizona win looked like most of the others, like a boa constrictor eating
2 (2)
TCU
Playing New Mexico is only slightly better than forfeiting to it in BCS eyes
3 (4)
Auburn Next stop: The SEC title game with South Carolina
4 (9)
Wisconsin A hard choice here over Stanford and Michigan State, which beat them
5 (6)
Stanford Jim Harbaugh has them four spots too high
6 (8)
Michigan St. Beat Wisconsin, yes, but has fewer other impressive wins
7 (10)
Ohio State Gotta get Michigan off their schedule. Lowers the whole tone
8 (11)
Nebraska Big 10 Commissioner Jim Delany just bought a very angry constituency
9 (13)
Arkansas Nice work over LSU, though Atlanta Falcons fans won't be happy
10 (15)
Missouri Let's be honest -- the Big 12 is just a great whopping mess
11 (17)
Nevada Maybe a tad high, but the best big game of the year for sheer entertainment
12 (16)
Oklahoma
Gave up 41 to Oklahoma State and won. Go figure
13 (1)
Boise St.
Will have to learn to love the Fight Hunger Bowl
14 (5)
LSU
Les Miles must have had some bad grass (and go ahead, make your jokes)
15 (7)
Oklahoma St. Gave up 47 to Oklahoma and almost won. Go figure
16 (14)
Virginia Tech
Ten straight, with Florida State up next
17 (12)
Alabama
Maybe too low, but three hard losses are still three losses
18 (18)
Texas A&M
Went 3-0, then 0-3, then 6-0
19 (20)
South Carolina The last game Stanford has to care about is these guys v. Auburn
20 (23)
Florida St. That 30-point loss to Oklahoma seems so long ago
21 (19)
Utah The wheels kind of came off after the TCU loss
22 (24)
Northern Illinois How did they lose to Iowa State?
23 (NR)
Hawaii
Suddenly, 9-3 and a win over Nevada looks pretty damned good
24 (NR)
West Virginia
The Big East stinks, but these guys did the best they could
25 (25)
Central FloridaCan SMU in the Conference USA title game be called a showdown? I thought not
Previous Rank in Parentheses

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Quietest time in sports yields a pair of idiotic fascinations

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Quietest time in sports yields a pair of idiotic fascinations

Some time not that very long ago, someone in sports management who will almost certainly spend all of eternity bobbing for razor-studded apples in a pool of lava saw an opportunity in the phrase, “The quietest time in sports.” And decided to fill it with filth.
 
It is believed to begin right after the end of the NBA Finals, although that artificial start date has been extended through free agency now that the NBA’s principal entertainment vehicle is the burning of money. It used to be right after the Major League Baseball All-Star Game, though now it has been extended backward. And it ends roughly at the beginning of NFL and/or college training camps, depending on where you live and which of those two beasts you profess your God to be.
 
But let’s get back to the management succubus who has set us on the path that has led inexcusably to the current point. The idea that baseball no longer holds the interest or attention spans of the young, cool and inadequately trained in the value of money is now accepted as fact, and as any marketing nitwit will tell you, nature abhors a vacuum.
 
So here’s what we’ve got. Floyd Mayweather and Conor McGregor in what is very simply a lazy-stereotype-laden comedy tour that isn’t funny let alone even mildly convincing. They have both been on the stage too long, with a month still to go before the final shame-off August 26, where they simply enter the arena, stand with their backs to each other at the ring rope and spend 45 minutes trying to target-spit into the eyes of the high-rollers. Why the promoters didn’t just muzzle Mayweather and McGregor and use actual professionals like Key and Peele and Aisling Bea and Ed Byrne to work the crowds for a million per is simply a lack of imagination at work.
 
Here’s what else we have. Our idiotic fascination for Lonzo Ball’s two best Summer League games being achieved wearing shoes other than those promoted by his father/huckster as though his skills and intelligence are all in his feet.
 
What this actually is, of course, is people using Lonzo’s momentary and mostly microscopic achievement to call LaVar a tedious swine without ever using his name or his product catalog because he, like McGregor and Mayweather, beats down crowds and calls it entertainment, and people have signed on in a weird backdoor way – by finding reasons to like the son as a weapon against the father.
 
Thus, Lonzo Ball gets to learn how to be a professional athlete of note while carrying the load of his father’s impression upon the nation as well as the loads of those who believe that sins of the father must revert to the son. Popularity’s dominant property is its corrosion, and Ball will have to have very fast feet and well-constructed shoes indeed to dance away from the rising tide of a bored fan base with an ax to grind.
 
It isn’t as instantly gratifying a train wreck as Mayweather-McGregor, but it is a triumph of the new marketing strategy of wholesale idiocy that diminishes the watcher as well as the watched.
 
Neither of these events are in and of themselves interesting. Mayweather-McGregor is simply a kangaroo boxing a bear because circus entertainment no longer has circuses as venues, and Ball’s summer bears almost no relationship to the true test of his career – how to be the best player on a terrible team and then make the adjustment to being the third best player on a rebuilding team.
 
Ball has a longer shelf life because of that single useful component, but it is made less rather than more interesting by the presence of his father, who is now indelibly part of the tale at a time when most parents leave their children to find their fortunes by the virtues of their skills and wits.
 
McGregor-Mayweather has the sole benefit of being cringeworthy both before, during and after the event, a month-long smear of degradation that reduces all involved, including those who buy the fight, into penitents, into rolling apologies. It is an event in which nobody gets out with any shred of dignity, with the single revolting example of the grisly accountant-beasts who will take the Internal Revenue’s cut immediately after the fight.
 
And if that isn’t Satan winning, then you don’t know how to score a game in which Satan plays on all the teams at once and sees to it that the game is scheduled in the middle of July because some client of his told him it was the best time of year for personal and professional disgrace with a scoreboard on the end of it.

Frank Deford's longform storytelling made him worthy of our attention

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AP

Frank Deford's longform storytelling made him worthy of our attention

Frank Deford’s death over the weekend did not mark the end of longform sportswriting as we knew it; he had long ago become part of the electronic commentariat that has reduced longform’s place in the public’s attention span.

But there is still longform writing and storytelling to be found in many places, and it is still worthwhile. It has more production value, as the TV folks like to blather, and the words have to fight for their place between the cracks left by the pictures and the mutated graphics, but longform lives, and it should, lest we all agree as one people to further desiccate that attention span like a grapefruit left in the sun.

Deford’s death, though, reminds of when longform was the zenith of the storytelling art. It could, and still can, give you access and depth and breadth that a TV crew simply could not, and cannot. Even extended TV features are by their very nature so contrived by all the equipment that nothing is natural, nothing is a surprise, and the act of writing is almost an afterthought.

Deford knew this. He more than merely dabbled in TV himself, playing the wizened old raconteur who was as much character in his pieces as storyteller. He was also a star and a starmaker with The National, a daily sports network in newspaper form that was long on talent and ideas but short on delivery and distribution. It lasted 17 months, until mid-1991, but it led to grander attempts decades later, and could if you squint your eyes hard enough be the natural parent of Grantland and The Ringer and Vice and SB Nation and dozens of others – all bigger ideas, positioned in the post-typing world. Some lasted, more didn’t, but capitalism is like that – making fuel to keep the fires burning and the engines churning.

Deford could have thrived in such a world, to be sure. He was not, in the hideous phrase, “a man of his time.” Indeed, he was a crossover figure years ago in ways that other longform writers attempt to resist even now. They want to be Deford at the height of his powers at a time when the instruments for their gift are either dying or veering away from anything that hits the 600-word mark.

But his passing did not kill the art of clever writing and incisive storytelling. There are far too many people who can do that still, even if the market for their gifts is neither as pronounced nor as eager for the product as it once was. It did remind us not only that he was a giant, but that there are still giants among us should we deign to take the time to seek them.

Thus, Deford’s death marked his passing but not the thing that made him worthy of our attention. Storytelling, longform and otherwise, remains the heart of why this is still worthwhile to a culture, and when the generation his work spawned starts to die off, I suspect we’ll still be saying the same thing then. Notebooks are smartphones, photographs are streams, but the human eye and ear and hand still remain pre-eminent.

That is, until the robots take over, at which point reading won’t be worth it.