Rookie Newton already breaking records

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Rookie Newton already breaking records

From Comcast SportsNet

TAMPA, Fla. (AP)Cam Newton thinks the Carolina Panthers are capable of making a strong stretch run, building confidence for a promising future.

With the No. 1 overall draft pick growing up faster than most people considered possible, whos to argue with the 2010 Heisman Trophy winner?

Newton ran for three more touchdowns Sunday, setting an NFL single-season record for rushing TDs by a quarterback and pacing a 38-19 rout of the reeling Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

The Panthers (4-8) have won two straight to double their victory total from last year. Though the success came against winless Indianapolis and the Bucs (4-8), whove dropped six in a row, Newton feels Carolina is jelling as a team.

In addition to putting together three scoring drives of 80-plus yards against Tampa Bay, the Panthers defense forced the Buccaneers to settle for four first-half field goals and didnt allow a touchdown until late in the fourth quarter.

Im seeing a lot of maturity from this team, myself included. It gave us a lot of security in our minds, knowing that the defense is going to come out like they did and hold those guys to field goals. They had a great mentality, Newton said.

Youve got to win games in December, thats what the great teams do, the rookie added. Were not going to overlook anybody. I think we did enough of that earlier in the year. Weve got to take each game at a time, but most importantly each play at a time.

A trio of 1-yard scoring runs gave Newton 13 TDs rushing, one more than New Englands Steve Grogan had in 1976. He also had his first reception as a pro to set up Jonathan Stewarts first-quarter TD, then threw a 19-yard TD pass to Legedu Naanee to finish one of Carolinas three long scoring drives.

I wouldnt say its easier each week. Its a challenge each and every week, Newton said. The one thing Ive seemed to get is more comfortable. Dictating to the defense to some degree with your eyes, the pre-snap reads. The only difference in the NFL and college is the athleticism increases at each position.

Tampa Bay (4-8), which played in throwback creamsicle jerseys and white helmets bearing the logo of a winking pirate, has lost seven of eight following a 3-1 start. The Bucs had nine penalties to Carolinas two, and coach Raheem Morris lashed out at his team for what he described as undisciplined play.

I can take getting beat by a better football team. The foolish things that happened in that game, as far as penalties, some of the things that we caused, are just unacceptable, Morris said. We are not playing like a smart football team right now.

The coachs frustration peaked on the final play of the third quarter when linebacker Geno Hayes sacked Newton for a 4-yard loss only to have defensive tackle Brian Price flagged for unnecessary roughness. It was not clear what Price did to draw the penalty.

Morris removed Price from the game and sent him home.

It was foolish. Its selfish to your teammates, to everybody in the organization, to your fans. Thats terrible. Thats just selfish behavior, to get a 15-yard penalty in that situation when thats all we talk about, thats all we discuss, Morris said. You just dont do that to your team.

The Bucs played without quarterback Josh Freeman, who sat out with an injury to his right shoulder. Josh Johnson made his fifth pro start, throwing for 229 yards and one touchdown while also leading his team in rushing.

Newton completed 12 of 21 passes for 204 yards and no interceptions. He added 54 yards rushing on 14 carries, teaming with Stewart (14 attempts, 80 yards) to help Carolina gain 163 on the ground. Newton nearly scored on his reception after throwing backward to Naanee on the far side of the field and taking a throw-back to the left.

Its a play the Panthers have practiced for a while, but had never used in a game.

He gave me a catchable ball and put the pressure on me to make the play, Newton said. In practice, I cant get hit and it goes for touchdowns. I was trying to get him to the Pro Bowl with the highest quarterback rating, but that didnt work out.

Stewarts 1-yard run put Carolina up 14-0. Newton leaped over the pile to finish an 83-yard, game-opening march and tied the record for rushing TDs by a quarterback to make it 31-12 in the third quarter. His third TD, giving him the record, a 15-play, 91-yard drive that lasted nearly eight minutes.

Im not going to sit up here and say it doesnt mean something, Newton said of the record. Im not focusing on individualism in this game. Its still 11-on-11. I dont think I couldve done anything without those other 10 guys, most importantly the five guys who are blocking their tails off each and every snap.

Connor Barth kicked field goals of 50, 47, 46 and 44 yards for Tampa Bay in the first half. Johnson finally got the Bucs into the end zone when he threw a 23-yard TD pass to Dezmon Briscoe with 6:35 remaining.

In addition to completing 16 of 27 passes and being intercepted once, Johnson led Tampa Bay with 45 yards rushing on five attempts. LeGarrette Blount(notes), coming off consecutive 100-yard games, was limited to 19 yards on 11 carries.

Its very satisfying. The big thing thats really exciting is we have a bunch of young guys who have gone through so much, now theyre seeing some rewards, Carolina coach Ron Rivera said.

I think we do have a run in us. Weve got good football teams coming Atlanta, Houston, Tampa again, Rivera said. Weve got to continue to work. We need to finish strong. We do expect to build on this and gain momentum.

Manaea exits A's game in Anaheim with left shoulder tightness

Manaea exits A's game in Anaheim with left shoulder tightness

ANAHEIM — A’s starter Sean Manaea left Wednesday night’s game after two innings with tightness in his throwing shoulder.

It’s a troubling sign for an Oakland rotation that’s already been hit hard by injuries.

The A’s are about to welcome back Kendall Graveman from his own shoulder issue — he’s scheduled to come off the disabled list and pitch Thursday night. Sonny Gray’s return from a lat injury could come next week if he emerges from Thursday’s Triple-A rehab start OK.

But if Manaea goes on the shelf for any period of time, it certainly cancels out a portion of that optimism. The 25-year-old lefty usually sits in the low to mid-90’s with his fastball. Throughout Wednesday’s start, his fastball was in the 88-89 mile-per-hour range, only registering as high as 90 a handful of times. Manaea gave up three runs in the second inning against the Angels. For the season, he’s 1-1 with a 5.18 ERA in five starts.

More information should be coming after the game. The A’s trailed the Angels 3-2 in the bottom of the fifth.

Stanford star McCaffrey boosts NFL Draft stock with special teams skills

Stanford star McCaffrey boosts NFL Draft stock with special teams skills

INDIANAPOLIS -- More and more college coaches are putting their starters and even their stars on special teams as they seek to pile up every possible point in an era of pedal-to-the-metal shootouts and never-safe leads.

Fading fast are the days when superstars would catch their breath on the sideline when the kicker or punter trotted onto the field with the scrubs.

NFL teams love it.

Watching how players handle themselves as a blocker, gunner or returner provides a glimpse into a prospect's range, selflessness and versatility. It also delivers a sneak peek into how coachable he'll be, says Phil Savage, the SiriusXM NFL Radio host who spent two decades as an NFL coach, scout and executive and now oversees the Senior Bowl.

"I think because of the landscape of college football where scoring is at a premium, you've got to figure out a way to put points on the board not only on offense but through your special teams and defensively, as well," Savage says. "These coaches want to get these young players on the field as soon as possible, and a way to do that is utilize them on special teams."

These tapes provide a bonus to pro scouts.

"Now you have a vision of what that player might forecast to in the NFL as a young player and, specifically, as a rookie," Savage said.

Offensive and defensive coaches have a better idea of the types of players they're integrating into their schemes, and special teams coaches no longer get blank stares and blank canvases from the rookie class.

"Not only do you like the fact that they come in and have experience doing it, but you love the mentality if you're a coach and a decision maker that this guy isn't a diva, he's got no ego about it, he understands the team and puts team before self," says ESPN draft analyst Todd McShay.

"And he comes in with the mindset of 'What can I do to help the team and how can I contribute?' Those are the guys that seem to make it and last longer in the league because they're just willing to do different things and whatever it takes."

The prime example in this year's draft class is Stanford running back Christian McCaffrey , a "dynamic player than can do it all," according to Broncos GM John Elway.

McCaffrey gained more than 5,000 yards from scrimmage in his college career and added almost 2,000 more as a returner.

"There's just a lot of big plays open in the return game," McCaffrey says. "You see special teams have such an impact on the game today. Any time I can have the ball in my hands, I feel like I can do something dangerous, and that's really why I love the return game."

Other highly touted draft prospects who polished their resumes on special teams include Michigan safety Jabrill Peppers, LSU safety Jamal Adams, Washington wide receiver John Ross, and USC cornerback Adroee' Jackson, all of whom are projected as high selections.

McShay says "we're seeing more and more programs put an emphasis on special teams and having their key players contribute in one or more areas on special teams."

He pointed to Ohio State, where Urban Myers coaches special teams himself.

"It's a major emphasis there, and so you'll see some more guys typically lined up and contributing that are starters and stars," McShay says. "It's an honor to be on special teams."

Not a burden.

"It is not uncommon now to see people that are going to be picked in the first round having 100-plus special teams plays," suggests NFL draft consultant and former Dallas Cowboys executive Gil Brandt.

He pointed to the University of Florida, where Gators defensive backs cover kickoffs as well as they do receivers.

"Everyone's always trying to get their best guys on the field," Brandt says.

That's a change from years past when coaches feared exposing their star players to the extra hits.

The added value benefits the players, whose multiple talents allow NFL general managers to address many needs.

"We're seeing more emphasis on it in college, and I think NFL teams love to see it because if just means you're getting a bit more for your buck," McShay says.

Top talents who bolstered their value by playing special teams:

CHRISTIAN McCAFFREY , RB, STANFORD: He shined at the combine working out with the running backs and was as impressive running routes. Asked if there was anything he couldn't do, the son of former NFL wide receiver Ed McCaffrey said then: "I can't sing."

JABRILL PEPPERS , S, MICHIGAN: He worked out with safeties and linebackers at the combine, where teams talked of him playing RB and WR in addition to returning kicks. "The bottom line is I'm a ballplayer and I'm a hell of a ballplayer," Peppers said.

JOHN ROSS , WR, WASHINGTON: He caught 81 passes with 17 TDs last season but actually posted more return yards (2,069) than scrimmage yards (1,924) in his college career.

ADOREE' JACKSON , CB, USC: One of the best special teams coverage players in the NCAA, Jackson also scored eight TDs on punt and kick returns in college. His punt return averages rose from 6.0 yards to 10.5 and 15.8.

JAMAL ADAMS , S, LSU: Another star in coverage, Adams' defensive mentality extends to special teams. "I love being on the field and just playing football," said Adams, whose father, George, was a first-round pick by the Giants in 1985.

ALVIN KAMARA , RB, TENNESSEE: In a deep running back group, Kamara separates himself with his special teams acumen. "A lot of teams have been bringing up special teams," Kamara said.

DESMOND KING , CB, IOWA: He had eight interceptions as a junior and three as a senior. "I had a really good special teams season," King said. "Not being targeted as much, I still went out there and competed the best I could and was still making plays."

CHRIS WORMLEY , DE, MICHIGAN: Wormley touts playing for Jim Harbaugh as one of his attributes. "Coach Harbaugh came in and ran our program like an NFL program, like he had with the 49ers," said Wormley, who blocked three kicks his senior season.

ZAY JONES , WR, EAST CAROLINA: Like McCaffrey, he has good NFL bloodlines (son of Robert Jones, brother of Cayleb Jones). He caught 158 passes as a senior, but spent his first two seasons in college also making his mark as a returner.