New 'lively' boards at HP to benefit Sharks?

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New 'lively' boards at HP to benefit Sharks?

Ever since the Sharks moved to HP Pavilion in 1993, there have been constant improvements to the building. New scoreboard, new video screens, and a new sound system... all to enhance the experience of the fan. However, this summer the biggest upgrade might go to the players, with the first brand-new installation of hockey boards and glass since the arena opened 18 years ago. And with change... well... comes change.
"They are more lively," Sharks captain Joe Thornton told me. "It will be a nice home ice advantage, you know we'll get used to those boards. It's going to be good for us.Good for the Sharks, as soon as they can get accustomed to longer rebounds, and play them to an advantage."The boards are a little bit faster," said Joe Pavelski. "It's fun when the puck comes off faster and ends up in the middle of the rink quicker, that's where a lot of the goals are scored from. Things just happen faster."Another benefit of the new system is the glass; which actually has built-in flex and improved 'give' in its connection to the walls... giving players a little more cushion when dishing and receiving body checks. Pavelski went on to call the new glass "friendly."Friendly, is also what the new glass will be for fans, for several reasons. First, the stanchions between panes are now clear instead of metal, causing less of an obstruction. Secondly, the panes are much bigger in proportion, generating less of those obstructions. And lastly, the clarity of the glass is noticeably good with its young age. All of this comes in the same Summer that many other rinks around the NHL with 'seamless' glass systems have been removed. Their construction required too much rigidity with almost no 'give' or flexibility, and although fans preferred them, they were not safe enough for the Players Association. From what I heard, players were never fond of them.Head Coach Todd McLellan says even after just one scrimmage on the new system, he's got reaction from his players, mixed in with his own impressions."You could see the boards are a lot more lively. Coming off the end wall, I think our goaltenders and our defensemen have to experience that a little bit and get used to it," said McLellan. In order to grow more familiar, the Sharks will do something a little unconventional before their home opener on October 8th.According to the Head Coach: "We'll look at practicing in this building a few times before we play some home games. It's our home rink, our home ice surface. We should know it better than anybody."

Thornton, Marleau now permitted to speak with other teams

Thornton, Marleau now permitted to speak with other teams

Their futures with the Sharks more uncertain than ever, pending unrestricted free agents Joe Thornton and Patrick Marleau are now free to take calls from other teams to gauge their potential interest.

Nothing can be signed with a new team before July 1, and there is a ban on discussing terms of any potential deal. Teams have already reached out to Marleau, per TSN’s Pierre LeBrun, while Thornton is also reportedly receiving interest around the league.

While they could still return to the Sharks, it’s new territory for both, as neither Thornton nor Marleau has ever tested the unrestricted free agent waters. Most recently, they agreed to three-year contract extensions with the Sharks on the same day – Jan. 24, 2014 – in what was the final year of their current deals.

Whether they return to the Sharks could depend on the length of the deal. If other teams are willing to offer multiple-year deals to Thornton and Marleau, it makes their return to the Sharks less likely – particularly in Marleau’s case. Earlier in the offseason, NBC Sports California confirmed that Thornton was seeking a three-year deal, while Marleau preferred a deal of at least three years.

General manager Doug Wilson’s top priority this offseason is to re-sign goalie Martin Jones and defenseman Marc-Edouard Vlasic to long term extensions. Those contracts would likely cost the team a combined $12-14 million, and would begin in the 2018-19 season.

There is an added risk to any team that signs a player over the age of 35, as it would be on the hook for the entire salary cap hit regardless of whether that player is active (unless that player is on long-term injured reserve). 

Thornton turns 38 on Sunday, while Marleau turns 38 on Sep. 15.

Sharks conclude 2017 NHL Draft with five more forwards in the system

Sharks conclude 2017 NHL Draft with five more forwards in the system

CHICAGO – After nabbing a center in the first round on Friday, the Sharks added four more forwards and one defenseman to conclude the second day of the annual NHL Entry Draft on Saturday, held this year at United Center.

The Sharks weren’t explicitly trying to restock their forward cabinet, according to general manager Doug Wilson and scouting director Tim Burke, although the club did make two separate moves in surrendering some later round picks to move up in the fourth round (to take center Scott Reedy) and sixth round (to take left wing Sasha Chmelevski).

First, though, it was defenseman Mario Ferraro in the second round at 49th overall. The offensive defenseman was a player that the Sharks targeted, using the pick they acquired from New Jersey last Friday as part of the trade for Mirco Mueller.

“He’s got a lot of speed, offensive guy, exciting,” Burke said. “Puck-moving type of guy.”

Wilson said: “We’re very pleased with the d-man. He’s a very dynamic, athletic guy, great skater. He was a guy that we moved up a little bit aggressively to get because that round, you could see people going after who they wanted. He is a guy that we identified.”

After moving up from the fifth round to the fourth round last Friday, again because of the Mueller trade, the Sharks jumped up 21 more spots in the fourth round by obtaining the Rangers pick at 102nd overall for the 123rd and 174th selections.

Center Scott Reedy is a player that Burke has high hopes for, projecting the Minnesota native as a “second line right winger [with] high-end potential.” Burke pointed out that Reedy, who is friends with first round pick Josh Norris, occasionally played on the same line with Norris for each of the last two seasons with the U.S. Under-18 team.

“He’s a big, strong forward that can play both positions (center and right wing),” Burke said.

Right wing Jacob McGrew, an Orange, CA native, went to the Sharks in the fifth round despite missing all of his first season in junior with a lower body injury suffered in training camp with Spokane (WHL).

“We knew about him before he went up there,” Burke said. “He’s a California kid. … If he was healthy he probably would have gone earlier.”

The Sharks again moved up to snag Huntington Beach native and center Chmelevski at 185 overall, and made their sixth and final pick in the 212th position by taking left wing Ivan Chekhovich in the seventh round. Both players look to have some offensive skill, based on their numbers and Youtube highlights.

Burke was surprised that both players were around so late.

“I thought they had pretty good years and they kind of slipped in the draft,” he said. “We weighed that versus some other more project-type guys, and we thought they had more offense and finish to their game. They just kept sliding, so we took a chance on them.”

Wilson said: “We moved up for the guys we wanted, and then there were some skilled guys at the end that we were surprised were still there. … We’ll go back and take a look how it all went, but we feel, I think, really good about where we ended up with this.”