NHL proposes expanded revenue sharing

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NHL proposes expanded revenue sharing

The NHL faces a differences in revenue unlike all major American sports except for the NBA.The disparity between the highest-grossing team -- the Maple Leafs -- and the lowest-grossing team -- the Islanders is more than 3-to-1, according to Forbes, helping the Maple Leafs post an operating income of more than 80 million while the Islanders lost 8.1 million in 2011.With a discrepancy as large as this, it comes as no surprise that with the NHL and the Players' Association continue to hash out a new collective bargaining agreement, the league has sought to expand revenue sharing.The NHL's current revenue-sharing system has faced criticism in the media for its convoluted format that makes it difficult for teams to predict whether they'll have to contribute to or receive from the revenue-sharing pool and if so, how much. The current system also excludes any team in a market of more than 2.5 million households from receiving funds in the revenue sharing. That prevents teams like the Islanders that generate little revenue despite playing in a large market from receiving any assistance to their bottom lines.For the Sharks, increased revenue sharing should make little difference. San Jose was precisely in the middle for revenue in 2011, the most recent year for which Forbes has data. The Sharks' revenue has steadily increased from 69 million in 2006 to a peak of 96 million last year.While expanded revenue sharing may minimally affect the Sharks, it could vastly change the finances of some of San Jose's Pacific Division foes. The Coyotes, Stars and Ducks all fall behind the Sharks in revenue, with Phoenix's 70 million in revenue the second-lowest figure in hockey. Increased revenue sharing could suck more out of the Kings, whose revenue of 101 million was 11th-most in 2011 and presumably will increase after Los Angeles' run to the Stanley Cup.The bigger impacts of the league's latest proposal for a new CBA on the Sharks would be from the altered distribution of hockey-related revenue. According to the Associated Press, the league's proposal to the players on July 13 called for lowering the share of hockey-related revenue given to the players from 57 percent to 46 percent.Despite the Sharks' 96 million in revenue, they still posted an operating loss of 7.8 million in 2011, their biggest loss since 2003. As San Jose's revenue has increased, so have its expenses, especially player expenses, which have nearly doubled since 2006. By lowering the percentage of hockey-related revenue given to the players, the league could limit the Sharks and other NHL franchises' player expenses and thereby help the 18 franchises that posted operating losses in 2011 float out of the red.

Report: Sharks, Robinson parting ways after five seasons

Report: Sharks, Robinson parting ways after five seasons

After five seasons with the Sharks, Larry Robinson is reportedly leaving the organization.

Robinson, 65, spent two seasons as an associate coach with the Sharks from 2012-14 before serving as the director of player development for the past three seasons.

TSN in Montreal and the Montreal Gazette originally reported the news.

According to the Gazette: 

Robinson’s contract with the Sharks expires on July 1, but agent Donnie Cape said Thursday that San Jose general manager Doug Wilson has given him permission to speak with other teams. Robinson lives in Bradenton, Fla., and the long travel distance to San Jose is one of big the reasons he’s looking for a new team to work for.

Robinson seemed to ponder retirement in 2014, but signed a three-year extension to remain in the Sharks' front office. He worked mostly from his home in Florida the past two years, making occasional trips to San Jose, including during training camp.

In the summer of 2015, Robinson underwent surgery for skin cancer.

Recognized as one of the best defensemen in NHL history, Robinson won six Stanley Cup championships with the Montreal Canadiens as a player, and holds the NHL record for playing 20 straight seasons in the playoffs. A 10-time All-Star and two-time Norris Trophy winner, Robinson was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1995.

Robinson was the head coach of the Los Angeles Kings from 1995-99, and the New Jersey Devils from 1999-2002 and again in 2005-06. He led the Devils to the Stanley Cup in 2000. Robinson has nine Stanley Cup rings as a player and coach.

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The Sharks did not renew the contract of pro scout Jason Rowe, who had been with the organization for the past nine seasons. Rowe focused on eastern NHL and AHL teams.

Sharks ink pair of European prospects

Sharks ink pair of European prospects

The Sharks officially announced the signing of defenseman Radim Simek to a one-year contract on Tuesday, as well as Swedish forward Filip Sandberg to a two-year contract.

Simek’s deal was reported on Monday and confirmed by NBC Sports California. The contract is valued at $925,000 for the 2017-18 season, a source confirmed. The 24-year-old defenseman spent the past five seasons in the Czech league, posting 24 points (11g, 13a) and 30 penalty minutes with a plus-18 rating last season. A left-handed shot, he is listed at five-foot-11 and 196 pounds on the IIHL website.

In 211 career games in the Czech league, he posted 91 points (37g, 54a) and a plus-51 rating.

"Radim is a quick transition defenseman who drives the play offensively and plays with a physical edge," general manager Doug Wilson said in a statement. "We like his offensive instincts especially on special teams and think his game will translate well in North America."

Sandberg, 22, has 71 points (25g, 46a) in 204 career games in the Swedish league. Last season, he posted 25 points (8g, 17a) and a plus-17 rating in 52 games.

Sandberg is set to make $742,500 in 2017-18 and $792,500 in 2018-19, a source confirmed.

The five-foot-nine, 180-pound Stockholm native also competed in the World Jr. Championships in 2013 and 2014, helping Sweden win silver both years.

"Filip is a very creative player who sees the ice well and can create offense in limited space," Wilson said. "He plays a high-pressure, puck-pursuit game and his battle level is something we have been impressed with, especially against older players. We are excited for him to join our organization."

The contracts for Simek and Forsberg are two-way deals, allowing them to play for the AHL Barracuda next season.