While Sharks sit, prospects are playing

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While Sharks sit, prospects are playing

SAN JOSE Whether or not the NHL season begins on Nov. 2 or is pushed back even further, younger prospects and recent draft picks wont be a part of training camp. In the unlikely event it starts early, the players taking part will more or less be those assured of their place on the NHL roster.

In other words, if Sharks fans want to get an up-close look at the clubs top minor league prospects, they cant do it without a cross-country flight to Boston Logan and subsequent pricey cab ride to Worcester, Mass.

Sharks general manager Doug Wilson and the teams entire coaching staff made that trek last week, taking in part of Worcesters training camp and a few of its preseason games. The trip was productive for a few reasons, according to Wilson.

It was a great opportunity for all our staff to spend time together, get on the ice, and see the young players that theyve worked with at the development camp, Wilson said, referring to the Sharks mid-summer prospect gathering in San Jose. Its as important that the young players there, who didnt get the opportunity to have a training camp or exhibition games here, show us what they can do. We have a very good team down there, thats very competitive.

There are a number of players on Worcesters roster that are of particular interest, and could even appear in a Sharks jersey this season. At the top is forward James Sheppard, who hasnt played NHL hockey in two seasons, but has seemingly worked his way back into playing condition.

In fact, in Worcesters first two games in Norfolk, Va. last weekend, Sheppard contributed a goal and two assists and was the Sharks nominee for AHL Player of the Week (he didnt win). Hes their first line center, skating between wingers Sebastian Stalberg and Travis Oleksuk.

Sheppard, who spoke to CSNCalifornia.com last week, seems primed to battle for a top-nine forward role for the Sharks this season provided he doesnt suffer any setbacks. It could be an incredible story after the former first round pick suffered a potentially career-ending knee injury in Sept. 2010 in an ATV accident while training in Vail, Co.

Were excited to see a player who has gone through a bump in the road, put all this work in, and come out of it on the healthy side, said Wilson, who traded a third round pick in 2013 to Minnesota last summer to acquire Sheppard, only to see him shelved for the entirety of the 2011-12 season. To see him playing the way he was playing, and feeling healthy, and having the jump back in his game, is exciting for Shep and really exciting for us, too. That factored into the riskreward of acquiring him.

Sheppard isnt the only player with NHL hopes thats on the mend. Goaltender Alex Stalocks career was also nearly cut short when he suffered a sliced nerve behind his left knee in Feb. 2011 while playing for Worcester. After nearly a full year on the shelf, Stalock returned late last season and played in 11 games between Worcester, Peoria, Ill. (AHL, on loan) and Stockton, Ca. (ECHL).

Hes 100 percent cleared by the Mayo Clinic. Its a great story, Wilson said. Obviously, he healed well. In that type of injury you just hope to get through that barrier, but hes completely cleared, looks great, and we expect him to have a very dominant year.

Stalock is half of the goalie tandem that also includes 2008 fourth round pick Harri Sateri. Each has started one of Worcesters first two games, and each allowed three goals as Worcester dropped both contests.

We have high expectations for Harri. The competition between the two will make them both better, but theyre both high-end goalies, Wilson said.

Wilson doesnt like to name names when asked which players on Worcesters roster are the closest to being NHL-ready, but there are still some players that provoke more interest than others, if based only on draft position or media reports.

One of those is defenseman Nick Petrecki. The big defenseman was chosen in the first round (28th overall) the same year as Logan Couture (2007), but has yet to get even a sniff of the NHL. Reviews of Petreckis play at the minor league level have been mixed, at best, as he begins his fourth year with Worcester.

In Petreckis defense, blueliners generally take longer to develop than high-end skilled offensive players like Couture. According to Wilson, the 23-year-old Petrecki is still on the right path, and has bulked up to 238 pounds to go along with his 6-3 frame.

Hes right on track, Wilson said. I think what happens is when a player like a Marc-Edouard Vlasic or Couture makes an NHL roster right awaythats the aberration. Look how young Nick Petrecki still is.

He continued: We try to build a career for players. What happens is, the big physical players normally take longer. Thats just the history of it. Theyve been able to intimidate or scare people in junior or college, and they need to round out their game.

Another name that popped up just this summer is that of 19-year-old forward Sean Kuraly, after his impressive performance at the World Junior prospect camp in Lake Placid, NY.

Kuraly, a fifth round pick of the Sharks in 2011, led all players at the camp with six goals and nine points. A native of Columbus, Oh., Kuraly is a lock to represent the United States at the World Junior Championships at the end of the calendar year.

In fact, one unnamed NHL scout told ESPN.com: "Whatever round this kid was taken in, it should have been the first.

He showed what hes capable of at that camp. Thats really all Im going to say, Wilson said. In the World Juniors this year, I think youll see some stuff.

Kuralys rise out of seemingly nowhere could be used as a good example against the credibility of prospect lists that appear in hockey publications and on websites. The Sharks are consistently rated among the leagues worst teams when it comes to in-the-system depth. HockeyProspectus.com ranks the Sharks 29th out of 30, while Hockeysfuture.com ranks the Sharks dead last.

So, too, does the well-respected Hockey News, putting San Jose 30th out of 30 teams, along with a C-minus grade.

GM Doug Wilson will tell you the Sharks success hasnt adversely affected their drafting. However, there are few blue-chippers to speak of, says the publication in its 2012-13 yearbook.

Its evident in speaking with Wilson that those lists dont keep him up at night.

People call and ask me to comment. Some of the people filling content dont do their homework, and some of the people they ask for their opinions are people that are trying to get back in the game, that arent in the game because theyre not very good at what they do, to be honest, Wilson said.

Instead, hed rather point to the kids like Kuraly, who could be yet another diamond in the rough for the franchise and its scouting department headed by Tim Burke, who just completed his 15th season in that role. In fact, the Sharks 2012-13 roster will feature a whole slew of mid-to-late round picks and home grown talent from previous drafts, including Joe Pavelski (7th round, 2003), Ryane Clowe (6th round, 2001), Douglas Murray (8th round, 1999), Tommy Wingels (6th round, 2008), Justin Braun (7th round, 2007), Thomas Greiss (3rd round, 2004) and Andrew Desjardins (undrafted free agent).

Since 2003, when Wilson took over, Sharks draft picks have played a total of 3829 NHL games, whether with San Jose or somewhere else in the league. That number is second only to Chicago (3980) and Montreal (4154).

Youve got to find guys that can play, that might not be fully developed, but have great hockey sense and get those pros in the second third, fifth, sixth, seventh rounds. Thats really where you make your bones in this business.

Sharks conclude 2017 NHL Draft with five more forwards in the system

Sharks conclude 2017 NHL Draft with five more forwards in the system

CHICAGO – After nabbing a center in the first round on Friday, the Sharks added four more forwards and one defenseman to conclude the second day of the annual NHL Entry Draft on Saturday, held this year at United Center.

The Sharks weren’t explicitly trying to restock their forward cabinet, according to general manager Doug Wilson and scouting director Tim Burke, although the club did make two separate moves in surrendering some later round picks to move up in the fourth round (to take center Scott Reedy) and sixth round (to take left wing Sasha Chmelevski).

First, though, it was defenseman Mario Ferraro in the second round at 49th overall. The offensive defenseman was a player that the Sharks targeted, using the pick they acquired from New Jersey last Friday as part of the trade for Mirco Mueller.

“He’s got a lot of speed, offensive guy, exciting,” Burke said. “Puck-moving type of guy.”

Wilson said: “We’re very pleased with the d-man. He’s a very dynamic, athletic guy, great skater. He was a guy that we moved up a little bit aggressively to get because that round, you could see people going after who they wanted. He is a guy that we identified.”

After moving up from the fifth round to the fourth round last Friday, again because of the Mueller trade, the Sharks jumped up 21 more spots in the fourth round by obtaining the Rangers pick at 102nd overall for the 123rd and 174th selections.

Center Scott Reedy is a player that Burke has high hopes for, projecting the Minnesota native as a “second line right winger [with] high-end potential.” Burke pointed out that Reedy, who is friends with first round pick Josh Norris, occasionally played on the same line with Norris for each of the last two seasons with the U.S. Under-18 team.

“He’s a big, strong forward that can play both positions (center and right wing),” Burke said.

Right wing Jacob McGrew, an Orange, CA native, went to the Sharks in the fifth round despite missing all of his first season in junior with a lower body injury suffered in training camp with Spokane (WHL).

“We knew about him before he went up there,” Burke said. “He’s a California kid. … If he was healthy he probably would have gone earlier.”

The Sharks again moved up to snag Huntington Beach native and center Chmelevski at 185 overall, and made their sixth and final pick in the 212th position by taking left wing Ivan Chekhovich in the seventh round. Both players look to have some offensive skill, based on their numbers and Youtube highlights.

Burke was surprised that both players were around so late.

“I thought they had pretty good years and they kind of slipped in the draft,” he said. “We weighed that versus some other more project-type guys, and we thought they had more offense and finish to their game. They just kept sliding, so we took a chance on them.”

Wilson said: “We moved up for the guys we wanted, and then there were some skilled guys at the end that we were surprised were still there. … We’ll go back and take a look how it all went, but we feel, I think, really good about where we ended up with this.”

Sharks coach DeBoer had 'good relationship' with Kovalchuk

Sharks coach DeBoer had 'good relationship' with Kovalchuk

CHICAGO – Ilya Kovalchuk is still reportedly mulling over a return to the NHL, four years after he surprisingly walked away from a monstrous contract with the New Jersey Devils to play in the KHL.

The Sharks have been linked to Kovalchuk, in large part because of Pete DeBoer, who was Kovalchuk’s most recent head coach. In 2011-12, Kovalchuk was a dangerous scoring winger under DeBoer, helping the Devils reach the Stanley Cup Final.

It was apparently a good working relationship between the player and the coach for the two seasons they were together, DeBoer said on Friday at the NHL Entry Draft at United Center.

“I loved Kovy in New Jersey,” DeBoer said. “We went to a Stanley Cup Final together. He was a huge piece for us there. I really enjoyed coaching him. I haven’t seen him in four or five years now. I’m sure there’s still a lot of game left there.”

DeBoer said he’s had no contact with the 34-year-old Kovalchuk, who would have to be traded by New Jersey before signing a new contract with any other NHL club. Still, it seems like the Sharks’ coach might welcome a reunion with Kovalchuk, who posted 78 points in 60 games with SKA Saint Petersburg last season, and has 816 points (417g, 399a) in 816 career NHL games with Atlanta and New Jersey.

“I had a really good relationship with him. I had a lot of respect for him as a player and a person,” DeBoer said.

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DeBoer seemed as uncertain as everyone else as to whether Joe Thornton and Patrick Marleau will return to the Sharks or move on to other clubs as free agents.

But, naturally, it’s on his mind.

“You think about it all the time,” DeBoer said. “They’re obviously important pieces in the history of the franchise, and in our group. I also understand the business side of this, and there’s always tough decisions to make. The way I approach these type of things is I’m going to go to Canada and relax, and Doug [Wilson] is going to make those decisions. I’m sure we’ll have a good group come training camp.”

“We’ve got a really good core group of guys and some tough decisions that have to be made. The one thing Doug and his group has shown over the years is their ability to stay competitive, to find a way even after making tough decisions. I have all the faith in the world in that, and I’m excited about training camp.”

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The Sharks lost David Schlemko in the expansion draft earlier in the week. Vegas then flipped him to the Canadiens for a fifth round pick in 2019.

“I think for David, it’s a great opportunity for him, especially going to Montreal,” DeBoer said. “For us, it’s an opportunity for a young guy to jump in. The one thing we have in the organization is some depth. There’s a lot of guys knocking on the door, and guys hungry to grab that job.”