Stanford's Luck named Pac-10 Player of Year

Stanford's Luck named Pac-10 Player of Year

Dec. 7, 2010

WALNUT CREEK, Calif.-- Quarterback Andrew Luck of STANFORD has been selected Pac-10 Offensive Player of the Year, tackle Steven Paea of OREGON STATE the Pat Tillman Defensive Player of the Year and Chip Kelly of OREGON the Pac-10 Coach of the Year. In addition, wide receiver Robert Woods of USC and defensive tackle Junior Onyeali of ARIZONA STATE have been named Pac-10 Offensive and Defensive Freshmen of the Year. The award winners are selected by the Pac-10 head football coaches.

Offensive Player of the Year Andrew Luck, QB, Stanford:
Luck, a sophomore from Houston, Texas, led a Stanford team that finished the season with an 11-1 record, the most wins in school history, and will participate in a BCS bowl game for the first time since 2000. The All-America quarterback leads the Pac-10 and ranks seventh in the nation with a 166.1 passing efficiency rating. Luck this season completed 245 passes in 349 attempts for 3,051 yards, just the fourth 3,000-yard season in school history, and a school record 28 touchdowns against just seven interceptions. He also rushed for 438 yards (8.6 yards per carry), establishing a single-season best mark by a Stanford quarterback. Under Lucks leadership, the Cardinal averaged 40.3 points per game, scoring 30 or more points in 11 of 12 games, and averaged 467.3 yards in total offense.

Pat Tillman Defensive Player of the Year Stephen Paea, DT, Oregon State:
Paea, a senior from Los Altos, Calif., anchored a Beaver defense that ranks fourth in the Pac-10 and 24th in the nation in sacks with 2.5 per game. He leads the team with six sacks and 10.0 tackles for loss. Last season he was co-recipient of the Morris Trophy presented to the Pac-10s top defensive lineman as voted on by the leagues offensive lineman. Paea has amassed 129 tackles for his career, including 29.5 tackles for loss and 14.0 sacks, and has established a school record with nine forced fumbles.

Offensive Freshman of the Year Robert Woods, WR, USC:
Woods, a true freshman from Carson, Calif., was among the league leaders in receptions (644.9 per game) and receiving yards (78660.5 per game), while hauling in six touchdown receptions. However, it was his school record-breaking kickoff returns marks that earned him !rst-team All-Conference kickoff returner. He returned 38 kicks for 971 yards (25.6 yard average) - both school records - and one touchdown. He ranks second in the Pac- 10, and 27th nationally, with 139.8 all-purpose yards.

Defensive Freshman of the Year Junior Onyeali, DE, Arizona State:
Onyeali, a true freshman from Denver, Colo., was key to a Sun Devil defense that was second in the league and 17th in the nation in rushing defense (120.2 yards per game). He led the Sun Devils and all Pac-10 freshmen with 6.5 sacks for a loss of 61 yards. Of his 18 stops this season, 11.5 were for loss. Arizona State claims back-to-back honors as LB Vontaze Bur!ct was honored last season as the Pac-10 Defensive Freshman of
the Year.

Coach of the Year Chip Kelly, Oregon:
Kelly has guided Oregon to back-to-back Pac-10 titles. While the Ducks have won back-to-back titles in 2000 and 2001, this is the !rst time doing so outright as they tied for the 2000 title. In addition, Oregon became the 12th Pac-10 team to have gone undefeated and untied en route to the Conference championship. The 12-0 perfect regular season are the most wins by an Oregon team, and the nine league wins is a !rst for any league team in Pac-10 history.

While the high-powered Ducks lead the nation in scoring offense (49.3 ppg) and are second in total offense (537.5 yards per game), the defense leads in the league in rushing defense (117.6) and are second in scoring defense (18.4 ppg). Kelly becomes just the fourth coach to earn Pac-10 Coach of the Year honors in back-to-back years (Larry Smith, USC 1987-88; Don James, Washington 1990-91; Pete Carroll, USC 2005-06).

In addition to individual awards, the Pac-10 coaches selected the 2010 All-Pac-10 Football Team that follows.

NOTES ON THE 2010 ALL-PAC-10 FOOTBALL TEAM
Selection Procedures: The All-Pac-10 Team is selected by the Pac-10 head football coaches.
By School: OREGON and STANFORD placed the most players on the !rst team with seven selections each, followed by CALIFORNIA and USC with three each.
By Class: Of the 28 !rst-team selections, 13 are seniors, 11 are juniors, three are sophomores and one freshman.
Unanimous: Four players were named on the !rst-team ballot of all 10 head coaches--QB Andrew Luck and WR Juron Criner of Arizona, DB Omar Bolden of Arizona State, and PR Cliff Harris of Oregon.
Three-time Selection: RB Jacquizz Rodgers of Oregon State is a three-time selection, the first ever for an Oregon State player.
Two-time Selections: Three players are repeat !rst-team selections from last year--DT Stephen Paea of Oregon State, DB Rahim Moore of UCLA, P Bryan Anger of California.
All-Academic: Four players were named to the !rst team on both the All-Pac-10 Team and the Pac-10 All-Academic Football Team--RB LaMichael James and TE David Paulson of Oregon, and OL Chase Beeler and RB Owen Marecic of Stanford. In addition, P Jeff Locke of UCLA was named first-team All-Academic and second-team All-Pac-10.

Courtesy Pacific-10 Conference media services.

Warriors bury Clippers rivalry with 50-point barrage in third quarter

Warriors bury Clippers rivalry with 50-point barrage in third quarter

OAKLAND -- The Warriors-Clippers rivalry, dead for a couple years, was buried 50 points deep Thursday night.

There were, and may always be, occasional fits of temper in which both players and officials will be tested. That surely was the case during the Warriors’ 123-113 victory over LA at Oracle Arena.

But scoring 50 points in 12 minutes, as the Warriors did in the third quarter, is a rather emphatic statement that serves as its own embellishment. It sent the Clippers back home, unable to muster even a half-hearted comeback.

“That was incredible,” Kevin Durant said of third-quarter scoring frenzy.

“That’s a lot of points,” Klay Thompson said. “It’s that the most we’ve had all season?”

Well, yes, it is. The Warriors’ previous high for points in a quarter was 45, also against the Clippers, on Jan. 28.

So this was astonishing even to the Warriors, the highest-scoring team in the NBA for three seasons running. This is the Warriors’ fourth 50-point quarter in franchise history and their first since March 1989. They made nine 3-pointers, tying a franchise record for triples in a quarter.

Fifties are rare, period; the last one by any team in the NBA was on March 25, 2014, when the Lakers dropped 51 in a quarter against the Knicks.

“I had no idea we scored that much,” said Stephen Curry, who scored 20 in the quarter -- 17 in the final 3:37 before halftime. “Obviously, coming back from 12 down to having a double-digit lead, it all started with the defensive end and finding transition.”

The scoring breakdown: Curry scored 20, Durant 15, Thompson 5, Andre Iguodala and Zaza Pachulia 4 each and JaVale McGee 2. The Warriors shot 73.9 percent (17-of-23) in the quarter.

“It all started from our defense, getting rebounds and getting out in transition,” Durant said.

The Warriors forced five LA turnovers in the quarter, off which they scored 11 points. Trailing by 12 at the half, they led by 12 entering the fourth quarter.

The Warriors have defeated the Clippers 10 consecutive times overall. They’ve beaten them 11 straight times at Oracle Arena. The average margin of victory in four games this season is 21.5 points.

This was a matter of how the Warriors responded to the threat posed by LA in the first half.

“I’m not sure what needed to happen,” Draymond Green said. “But I know we took that quarter over. And it was pretty spectacular.”

With Clippers rivalry over, Warriors feed off feud with Foster

With Clippers rivalry over, Warriors feed off feud with Foster

This will come as a sharp blow to Warrior fans who like things the way they are, but they probably can no longer use Scott Foster as an alibi for failure, or a stalking horse for rage.
 
Well, I mean they can, but let’s be honest here – the evidence just doesn’t support it any more.
 
Foster, who no matter what you say is one of the elite officials in the league, has also been cast as a bête noire by all things Golden State. Either he’s imperious, or he’s standoffish, or he makes himself too conspicuous – they’re all standard complaints made of all officials who aren’t otherwise branded as just plain terrible.
 
Only Foster isn’t terrible, given the fact that he has worked a series of NBA Finals, and that remains the gold standard for officiating.
 
But the Warriors bang their heads against the backboard when he works their games, and were on the verge of doing that again Thursday night against the Los Angeles Clippers. Foster called third quarter technicals on Andre Iguodala and the Warrior bench, and J.T. Orr called one on Draymond Green, all in the space of 6:34. The Warriors were unhinged, the fans were unhinged, innocent bystanders were being hit with flying hinges throughout the arena.
 
And in that stretch, the Warriors outscored the Clippers, 26-15, en route to a 50-point quarter (the first in two seasons and the third since the turn of the millennium) and another harsh slapdown of what used to be known as the Warriors-Clippers Cavalcade Of Hate, this time 123-113.
 
It isn’t that any more, not close. Truth is, the Warriors have won 10 consecutive games against the Clips, but probably never quite at decisively as this. At the game’s most lopsided stretch, Golden State outscored Los Angeles, 72-33, in a shade over 17 minutes.
 
Because that’s what they do.
 
Only this time, the comeback was not fueled by the existence of the Clippers, who had outplayed them pretty convincingly for the first 22 minutes and change, but with the officials, who as we have said before irk the hell out of them when their number includes Foster.
 
Who, again, is one of the game’s best officials. I think it’s a personality clash, to be frank, in which both sides can take some blame.
 
Truth is, though, when a team can go for 50 in a quarter and still have time to engage in a feud with the officials, it is making a kinky little statement about what they can do when enraged, and how difficult it is to stop them when they have a serious mad-on.
 
Yes, it is probably stretching a point to make this case, especially when the Warriors make 17 of 23 shots (9 of 15 from three) and assist on 13 of the 17 field goals. It is probably minimizing Stephen Curry’s 20-point quarter and his four assists, or Kevin Durant’s 15 and five rebounds, or David West imposing his body between Green and the officials to keep him from getting T’d up again for the second successive game.
 
But we have already established that rivalries are dying at their feet left and right. In the last three years the Clippers have gone from the Warriors’ arch-enemies to a team that has finished an aggregate 44 games behind the Dubs in the standings, making whatever animosity they can still stir 

Against the Clips a curio of a much earlier time. The Oklahoma City Thunder have come and gone, and even the Durant-Russell Westbrook has lost its last bit of elasticity.
 
Oh, there is still Cleveland, but that cannot be resumed for another 14 weeks at the earliest.
 
The Warriors, in short, have run out of opponents, and given that they will manufacture a foe when one does not otherwise exist, Scott Foster may have to serve for the time being, even if he is nothing but an intermittent prop to amuse the customers when the game cannot provide.
 
Though you’d have to think the third quarter Thursday makes that pretty thin oatmeal. The Warriors ate an entire game in 12 minutes, including the officials. They seemed like they got their fill.