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Steph, Monta power Warriors past Baron, Cavs

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Steph, Monta power Warriors past Baron, Cavs

March 8, 2011BOXSCORE WARRIORS VIDEONBAPAGE NBA SCOREBOARD

CLEVELAND (AP) When Monta Ellis gets hot and the shots start falling fast, his Golden State teammates know exactly what to do."Get out of his way," said Warriors forward David Lee, "or set him a screen."Ellis found his shooting stroke in the second half, making a career-high six 3-pointers, to finish with 24 points, and backcourt mate Stephen Curry added 23 points, sending Golden State to a 95-85 win over the Cleveland Cavaliers on Tuesday night.Ellis made all 5 of his 3-point attempts and scored 17 in the third quarter as the Warriors won for the second time in eight games. He and Curry combined for 25 of Golden State's 29 points in the third and the duo teamed for 47 points, 14 rebounds and 13 assists."I'm fortunate to be coaching a team that has two players in the backcourt that can shoot the ball from deep, put it on the floor, get to the mid-area and also get to the rim," Warriors coach Keith Smart said. "That doesn't happen that often."
VIDEO: Keith Smart postgameLee added 14 points and 14 rebounds as Golden State improved to 2-4 on a seven-game road trip.Baron Davis came off the bench and scored 19 in his second home game for the Cavs, who were powerless to stop Ellis once he warmed up from outside.
STEINMETZ: Re-acquiring B.D. would have been boldCleveland's J.J. Hickson dislocated his left little finger in the fourth, but the Cavs were actually relieved it wasn't worse.Hickson got hurt when the ball smashed into his finger as he tried to catch a pass. Hickson grabbed and clutched his left hand in pain, and after play was stopped, he sprinted past Cleveland's trainer and ran directly to the Cavs' locker room."I saw his finger pointing east and west," said Cavs coach Byron Scott, whose first season in Cleveland has been overloaded with injuries. "I didn't want to start crying in front of 17,000 people."The Cavs have already lost leading scorer Antawn Jamison to a broken little finger that required surgery, so Scott was thrilled to see Hickson return to the bench with his fingers taped."It scared me," Scott said. "When he first ran off the court, I was like, 'You gotta be kidding me, another one goes down?' Luckily, he was OK."By the time Hickson returned to the bench, Ellis and Curry had already shot the Warriors to a double-digit lead.Golden State's backcourt was too much for Cleveland's guards to handle. When the Cavs did prevent Ellis from getting off a shot, the Warriors simply swung the ball to Curry, who has scored more than 20 points in five of his past six games.Held to 4 points in the first half, Ellis came out firing in the third.He made his five 3s from a variety of spots - his other bucket in the period was a layup - as the Warriors, who trailed by 12 in the first quarter, opened a 76-65 lead entering the fourth. It didn't matter if the Cavs were up in his face, Ellis was in one of those shooter's zones when the basket seems a mile wide.Ellis dropped four 3s in the final 4:45 and scored Golden State's last 14 points of the third."I was just feeling it," said Ellis, who scored 41 in a tough loss at Boston last week. "I just had the confidence to knock them down."The Warriors are used to seeing Ellis score in bunches."We're not surprised," Curry said. "He takes his show on the road a lot. It's usually acrobatics at the rim, but tonight he was knocking down three's. He took over the third quarter and the beginning of the fourth. He was knocking down a lot of shots. He's tough to guard."Curry started slowly. He missed his only shot in the first quarter, but banged down a pair of 3s and scored 10 in the second, when the Warriors outscored the Cavs 29-16 to take a 47-46 halftime lead.Cleveland's fans have quickly adopted Davis as a favorite.The bearded guard got a rousing ovation when he checked in with 5:32 left in the first quarter and made a quick impact. He scored four points and added two assists, the second coming on a lob pass across the lane to Hickson, whose dunk gave the Cavaliers a 30-18 lead.Notes: Davis hasn't started since joining the Cavs. ... Warriors assistant coach Mark Price, one of the most popular players in Cavs history, received a loud ovation when he was shown on the arena's scoreboard during a timeout in the first quarter. Price's No. 25 is one of six retired jerseys hanging from the rafters at the Q. ... Scott was relieved that Hornets star Chris Paul wasn't more seriously hurt when he sustained a concussion on Sunday night. Scott coached Paul in New Orleans for four seasons. "I was glad to hear he was OK," Scott said. "I'm going to hive him a call again and see how he'd doing." ... Newly acquired Cavs big men F Luke Harangody (hip pointer) and C Semih Erden (groin) didn't play. Scott said he may rest both players the rest of this week.

What they’re saying: Congratulations to Andre Ward

What they’re saying: Congratulations to Andre Ward

Oakland's own Andre "Son of God" Ward is calling it a career at 32-0. And plenty of noteable teams and icons showed the champ respect on Thursday...

Gary Brown never recovered on the field from 2015 DFA: ‘Hurt me to my core’

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AP

Gary Brown never recovered on the field from 2015 DFA: ‘Hurt me to my core’

There was a time when Gary Brown was considered the Giants’ top prospect – their center fielder of the future. Hype was never higher than in 2011, when the fleet-footed 22-year-old set a franchise record with 188 hits in 131 games, earning California League Rookie of the Year honors with the San Jose Giants in his first full minor league campaign.

But six seasons and seven major league at-bats later, Brown’s professional baseball career ended at 28 years old.

“I feel like I let my emotions get the best of me in the years after that (2011 season),” Brown told NBC Sports Bay Area in an exclusive phone interview. “I think I started to believe the hype that everyone started to give to me.”

Brown never matched his magical .336-season in High-A ball with 14 home runs plus 53 stolen bases, and then struggled finding a routine with the rigors of the Pacific Coast League’s travel schedule once he reached Triple-A. Despite three hits in his seven at-bats as a September call-up with the Giants in 2014, Brown was designated for assignment on March 31, 2015.

Brown’s career spiraled playing the draining waiver game. Unsuccessful stints with the Cardinals and Angels sent Brown to the land of the last chance: Independent ball in the Atlantic League.

“It was not fun for me for quite a few years. I wasn’t a very happy person,” Brown said. “After I got DFA'd by the Giants, that really took a toll on me. I never really recovered from that, so I was kind of stuck in the past and things kind of just got away from me. 

“I was kind of heartbroken to be honest. I mean, it hurt me to my core.”

Through tumultuous career turns, the Southern California native never turned on the team that drafted him 24th overall in 2010.

“I'm thankful for the opportunity the Giants gave me. No matter how big or small mine was, I am very thankful” Brown said emphatically. “I definitely wish I could have shown what I feel like my true potential was, but it didn't work out that way. 

“I still root for the Giants. All my friends with the Giants, I'm still pulling for them. They run that organization so well. I have no ill intentions or anything bad to say about the Giants organization.” 

Far removed from his days with the Giants, Brown found new life with the Southern Maryland Blue Crabs in 2016. Brown batted .249 and returned to the team in 2017. He started strong with a .298 batting average in 31 games while having fun for the first time in years, but injuries struck at an inopportune time.

Chronic aches in his hip joints and intense back spasms, in addition to a frustrating lack of interest from MLB teams and the fact he and his wife had twins on the way, spurred Brown to retirement in the middle of the season on July 5.

“Retirement has nothing to do with the lack of competitiveness (of the Atlantic League). It was the distance and the time away, matching the minor league salary,” Brown said. “Going back to that makes it really hard on the family and when you get older it really becomes about what you value more.”

The player he once was is gone, but the person he is has only grown. There’s one piece of advice which goes beyond the diamond that Brown was sure to pass on to the next wave of future top Giants prospects.

“Never stop making adjustments,” Brown said ruefully.

Days away from turning 29 on Sept. 28 and out of baseball for the first time in his life, Brown is certainly making his own.

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Part 2 of our interview with Gary Brown focusing on where he is now in his life will be released Friday on NBCSportsBayArea.com.