Andre Iguodala

Andre Iguodala falls short in 'Best off the Bench' award

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USATI

Andre Iguodala falls short in 'Best off the Bench' award

According to NBA players, Andre Iguodala is not the best sixth man in the league.

On Friday morning, Lou Williams was recognized as the "Best off the Bench" player.

At the inaugural NBA Awards Show in late June, Iguodala finished runner-up in the Sixth Man of the Year race to Rockets guard Eric Gordon.

Iguodala received 43 first-place votes, 34 second-place votes and nine third-place votes.

Gordon registered 46 first-place votes, 40 second-place votes and eight third-place votes.

Williams was a very distant third with five third-place votes, 10 second-place votes and 15 third-place votes.

He averaged 18.6 points and 3.2 assists over 58 games with the Lakers last season, while shooting 44.4 percent from the field and 38.5 percent from deep.

In 23 regular season games with the Rockets, Williams averaged 14.9 points and 2.4 assists on 38.6 percent shooting overall and just below 32 percent from 3-point territory.

Against the Spurs in the Western Conference Semifinals, Williams struggled to the tune of 7.3 points per game. He shot 35 percent from the floor and below 18 percent from distance.

Iguodala played arguably his best game of the season in Game 5 of the NBA Finals -- 20 points (9 for 14 FG), four rebounds and three assists.

For the series, his +60 mark led the Warriors by a comfortable margin (Draymond Green +30, Kevin Durant +33, Steph Curry +30, Klay Thompson +22).

Iguodala was rewarded with a 3-year, $48 million contract this summer.

I doubt he cares whatsoever about falling short for this award...

Drew Shiller is the co-host of Warriors Outsiders and a Web Producer at NBC Sports Bay Area. Follow him on Twitter @DrewShiller

Iguodala 'looking forward to the on-camera thing' at PGA Championship

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AP

Iguodala 'looking forward to the on-camera thing' at PGA Championship

For Golden State Warriors star Andre Iguodala, there has really only been one downside to three straight berths in the NBA Finals and two championships. Those deep playoff runs wreak havoc on his golf game.

Iguodala is a golf fanatic who organizes his offseason workouts to accommodate his second competitive passion. His handicap in the summer time drops to 12, but he says it “blows up” to 15 during the season when he can’t play as often.

“Right now, I’m the lowest I’ve ever been,” Iguodala said. “I’m at a 12.3. I’ve been between 85 and 89 for two weeks straight. I just hit my ball well and I have that one bad hole that keeps me from 82. I’m feeling really good about my game and the season is right around the corner to ruin it again. I’m going to try to enjoy it while it lasts.”

Iguodala is parlaying that interest in golf into a job with Turner Sports covering the PGA Championship next week. Iguodala will be a “special contributor,” appearing on camera during the broadcast and providing content on social media during the major championship.

He has golfed Augusta National with Steph Curry, played in pro-ams with Justin Thomas and is a big fan of Rory McIlroy. Now he hopes his irreverent presence on social media and his dry sense of humor can splash some fun into the weekend at Quail Hollow Club in Charlotte, North Carolina.

“I’m looking forward to the on-camera thing, just to let people know my knowledge of the game and pretty much test myself,” Iguodala said.

Golf provides an outlet to break away from the grind of the NBA season. He’ll play on the road during longer trips, including during the playoffs, and calls Contra Costa Country Club in Pleasant Hill, California, his home course.

“I feel like golf has brought me some peace,” said Iguodala, one of the best sixth men in the NBA. “When things aren’t going right, I can get out on the golf course and when things are going really good on the court I can go and enjoy the scenery, enjoy the weather.

“And when I’m too high, I can have golf humble me and beat me up a little bit. It’s a really good place for me to be, on the golf course.”

Despite his best efforts, Iguodala hasn’t closed the golfing gap on Curry, who is nearly a scratch golfer. Warriors coach Steve Kerr pulled some strings to get the two on at Augusta after their first championship in 2015. Iguodala is still chasing Curry a few years later.

“That dude’s too good,” Iguodala said. “His game has gotten better as mine has gotten better. I need him to get worse.”

The PGA Championship begins on Aug. 10 on TNT. Iguodala will walk the course, potentially interview players and post content on PGA.com’s social media platforms on Aug. 11.

While many basketball players get into the media side of things to analyze games either in retirement or during the offseason, Iguodala is trying to strike out on a different path. He mentioned former Cavaliers star Brad Daugherty’s foray into NASCAR as inspiration to put his golf interest to work.

“That’s exactly what I’m looking forward to — is getting away from basketball. It’s something different,” Iguodala said. “I want to test myself and show people what I’m capable of doing in a different area that is kind of out of my comfort zone.”

Warriors officially ink six players to new contracts

Warriors officially ink six players to new contracts

The Warriors re-signed free agents Stephen Curry, Kevin Durant, Andre Iguodala, Shaun Livingston, Zaza Pachulia and David West to contracts, the team announced on Tuesday.

Curry, 29, averaged a team-high 25.3 points per game (10th in the NBA) in 2016-17 to go with 6.6 assists, 4.5 rebounds and 1.81 steals (seventh) in 33.4 minutes over 79 games, earning All-NBA Second Team honors. The two-time MVP led the league in three-point field goals for a fifth consecutive year, following his NBA-record 402 threes in 2015-16 with 316 triples in 2016-17, including an NBA single-game record 13 threes on Nov. 7 vs. New Orleans. Curry upped his averages to 28.1 points, 6.7 assists and 6.2 rebounds in 35.4 minutes over 17 games in the 2017 postseason, helping Golden State capture its second title in three seasons. In eight career seasons with the Warriors, Curry owns averages of 22.8 points, 6.8 assists, 4.4 rebounds and 1.79 steals and is the franchise’s all-time leader in three-point field goals (1,917, 10th in NBA history).

Durant, 28, tallied averages of 25.1 points (13th), a career-high 8.3 rebounds, 4.8 assists, a career-high 1.60 blocks (ninth) and 1.06 steals in 33.4 minutes over 62 games in his first season with the Warriors in 2016-17. The 6’9” forward earned All-NBA Second Team honors after hitting a career-best 53.7 percent from the field and becoming the first Warrior to average at least 25 points and eight rebounds per game since Rick Barry in 1966-67. Durant led the Warriors in postseason scoring with 28.5 points per game to go along with 7.9 rebounds, 4.3 assists and 1.33 blocks in 15 games, scoring at least 30 points in all five games of the NBA Finals on his way to Finals MVP honors. Durant joined Michael Jordan as the only players to earn NBA Finals MVP honors with averages of at least 35 points (35.2), eight rebounds (8.2) and five assists (5.4).

Iguodala, 33, averaged 7.6 points, 4.0 rebounds, 3.4 assists and 1.00 steals in 26.3 minutes over 76 games for the Warriors in 2016-17, while shooting a career-high 52.8 percent. A 13-year NBA veteran, Iguodala led the NBA in assist-to-turnover ratio (4.50) and was a finalist for 2016-17 NBA Sixth Man of the Year honors, leading all reserves in plus/minus with an on-court differential of +6.9. The 2015 NBA Finals MVP scored a playoff season-high 20 points in Golden State’s series-clinching Game 5 win over Cleveland in the 2017 NBA Finals, hitting 9-of-14 from the field in 38 minutes.

Livingston, 31, shot a career-best 54.7 percent from the field and posted averages of 5.1 points, 2.0 rebounds and 1.8 assists in 17.7 minutes over 76 games in 2016-17. The 13-year NBA veteran upped his accuracy to 57.6 percent from the field in the postseason, averaging 5.2 points over 14 games and scoring in double figures three times (twice in the NBA Finals). Livingston owns career averages of 6.6 points, 3.2 assists and 2.5 rebounds in 698 games with nine different teams, including three seasons with Golden State.

Pachulia, 33, averaged 6.1 points, 5.9 rebounds and 1.9 assists in 18.1 minutes over 70 games (all starts) in his first season with the Warriors, while hitting a career-high 53.4 percent from the field. The Georgian native led all centers in plus/minus (+6.0) and led the Warriors with 140 offensive rebounds in 2016-17. In 15 postseason games (all starts), Pachulia averaged 5.1 points and 3.8 rebounds in 14.1 minutes, scoring in double figures four times. For his career, Pachulia owns averages of 7.0 points, 6.0 rebounds and 1.3 assists in 961 games over 14 seasons with the Magic, Hawks, Bucks, Mavericks and Warriors.

West, 36, tallied averages of 4.6 points, 3.0 rebounds and 2.2 assists in 12.6 minutes over 68 games in his first season with the Warriors. The 14-year NBA veteran was one of only four players to play in all 17 of Golden State’s playoff games, averaging 4.5 points, 2.7 rebounds and 2.1 assists, and 13.0 minutes in his eighth career postseason appearance. A two-time NBA All-Star, West owns career averages of 14.1 points, 6.6 rebounds and 2.2 assists in 961 games with the Hornets, Pacers, Spurs and Warriors.

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