Jed York

With Dolphins' new initiative, York and the 49ers have opposite problem

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AP

With Dolphins' new initiative, York and the 49ers have opposite problem

The Miami Dolphins are doing something I thought for sure the San Francisco 49ers would have seized on by now – and no, I don’t mean hiring Adam Gase as the head coach. The 49ers would never consider something as daft as that.

No, the Dolphins are creating standing-room only areas at Dolphin Stadium in which, for $40, you get a chance to lean on a rail and fiddle with your phone, like you apparently like to do at bars.

No seat. No parking. The beers are just as expensive. But you get to stand and either watch a game, or not, depending on your already unreliable attention span.

The Dolphins claim they got the idea from the Chicago Cubs, who sold standing room seats for their World Series run. But the Cubs were doing something that hadn’t been done in 108 years. The Dolphins were doing something they do every year – be bland.

And for two twenties, plus about $100 in incidentals, you can have that experience, plus sciatica, plus tingling in your extremities, plus you’ll be dripping sweat onto your phone because Miami owns the national concession on humidity.

How this escaped Jed York’s notice is . . . well, actually, it’s kind of understandable. He’s got the opposite problem. He has people standing around checking their phones, but they are people who have tickets on the east side of the stadium choosing not to broil while their team gets its collective hat blocked every week. Jed WANTS those seats filled, and he can’t get that done until the team becomes too compelling for sunstroke.

But maybe he can charge fans for buying those seats, and then charge them again for leaving them vacant and standing in the concourse, bribing the bartender to turn on Raiders-Chargers.

I think they call it the in-game experience. Or in Miami, they call it, the grabbing-the-patron-by-the-ankles-and-shaking-everything-out-of-his-or-her-pockets experience.

Jed York would 'love' to have dinner with Jim Harbaugh

Jed York would 'love' to have dinner with Jim Harbaugh

It has been nearly 30 months since Jed York and Jim Harbaugh shared an awkward pregame embrace on Harbaugh's final day as 49ers coach.

The two have gone in different directions.

York and the 49ers have experienced a rapid decline. After a 2-14 season, York made the move to hire Kyle Shanahan as the 49ers' fourth coach in four seasons. Meanwhile, Harbaugh has thrived as head coach of Michigan, his alma mater.

On the MMQB Podcast with Peter King, York addressed what was announced as a "mutual parting."

"I don’t know if 'regret' is the right word," York said. "We had a lot of success together. We tried several times to get an extension done with Jim and, for whatever reason, those didn't culminate. And ultimately, as successful as it was here, I think Jim is very happy and he's doing an unbelievable job at Michigan.

"We obviously didn’t have success after Jim left. I don’t know that we'd be sitting here with John Lynch and Kyle Shanahan if something happened. And I don’t know that it would have worked in the long-term if we did get something done. I regret how we performed the last two years. I regret that the relationship was frayed between me and a coach that, you know, did a lot of great things for this franchise."

York said he saw Baltimore Ravens coach John Harbaugh, Jim’s brother, at the NFL owners meetings in Arizona. John Harbaugh told York he should get together with Jim and have dinner at some point to clear the air.

"I said, 'I'd love to do that.' I’d love to get together," York said. "And I think enough time has kind of passed where you can let whatever issues were there be buried and just truly be thankful for three great years when nobody expected us, certainly in 2011, to beat the Saints the way we did, to get close and, you know, be two muffed punts away from going to a Super Bowl in ‘11.

"And Just all the things that happened, and I'd love to sit down with Jim. Not in front of cameras, not in front of anybody else, but just share an evening with him and truly say 'Thank you,' and wish him the best of luck. Not obviously when he plays Notre Dame, but for the rest of the season, wish him the best of luck."

York: 'You have to be willing to change path if you've made a mistake'

York: 'You have to be willing to change path if you've made a mistake'

CEO Jed York and the 49ers are coming off what was universally regarded as one of the most-successful hauls in this year’s NFL draft.

But the 49ers entered with the No. 2 overall pick because the club fell over the past three seasons from 8-8 to 5-11 to 2-14 under three different head coaches. York has been criticized, and that’s the way it should be, York said Wednesday during an appearance on the NFL Network’s “Good Morning Football.”

“That’s who you should question,” York said. “This isn’t where we want to be. We don’t want to be a 2-14 team. And you don’t want to be a team that has its fourth head coach in four years. But you also have to be willing to change path if you’ve made a mistake and know that we’re not going to settle for being a 9-7 team.

“That’s not where we want to be. If you want to make your team great, you have to do everything that you can to get back up to that level. And that’s where we are. And we will get there. We had three NFC Championship games in a row sandwiched between a Super Bowl loss. It’s close, but that’s not where we want to be. We want to be a team that consistently competes for it. And when it’s all said and done, and John (Lynch), Kyle (Shanahan) and I look backward, we want to know that we won more together than anybody else.”

On the final weekend of the season, York fired general manager Trent Baalke and head coach Chip Kelly. He ultimately hired Lynch as general manager to pair with Shanahan, the former Atlanta Falcons offensive coordinator, as head coach.

York was in the 49ers’ draft room and watched how the new 49ers regime navigated the seven-round draft with six trades, including two first-day blockbusters that enabled the organization to select Stanford defensive end Solomon Thomas and Alabama linebacker Reuben Foster. Thomas and Foster were two of the top three players on the 49ers’ draft board.

“I don’t know that there’s enough data to assess where are they and where do they stack against everybody else,” York said. “What I’ll say is, I think the draft was a perfect example of how they work together.

“And watching John and Kyle work together, and watching how the scouts and the coaches work together. I have no idea whether it was a good draft or not -- we’ll find out three years from now -- but it certainly worked out the way we wanted it to because we planned for it. We were ready. And we executed because we were all on the same page.”

One of the big questions as the 49ers enter this season is whether the quarterback position is strong enough to win a lot of games this season. The 49ers have gone through a transition at quarterback with the depth chart comprised of veterans Brian Hoyer and Matt Barkley, draft pick C.J. Beathard of Iowa, and undrafted rookie Nick Mullens of Southern Mississippi.

“When you look at Kyle Shanahan, an offensive-minded guy who has history with the 49ers, directly and indirectly, I think he’s going to do a great job – he’s done a great job with Brian Hoyer in the past,” York said. “And I think he’s going to continue to do a great job with Brian. Brian has grown in his career, and I think he’s ready to be a good quarterback for us.

“So that’s a position, until you get your guy, you have to keep taking shots. As much as we compete with the guys up north (Seattle), they did that very well. They signed (Matt) Flynn to a big contract but they still drafted one they like, who happens to be Russell Wilson. And until you’re set, you can never stop taking shots to get your guy at quarterback because that’s what ultimately drives this league.”