Shaun Livingston

Warriors officially ink six players to new contracts

Warriors officially ink six players to new contracts

The Warriors re-signed free agents Stephen Curry, Kevin Durant, Andre Iguodala, Shaun Livingston, Zaza Pachulia and David West to contracts, the team announced on Tuesday.

Curry, 29, averaged a team-high 25.3 points per game (10th in the NBA) in 2016-17 to go with 6.6 assists, 4.5 rebounds and 1.81 steals (seventh) in 33.4 minutes over 79 games, earning All-NBA Second Team honors. The two-time MVP led the league in three-point field goals for a fifth consecutive year, following his NBA-record 402 threes in 2015-16 with 316 triples in 2016-17, including an NBA single-game record 13 threes on Nov. 7 vs. New Orleans. Curry upped his averages to 28.1 points, 6.7 assists and 6.2 rebounds in 35.4 minutes over 17 games in the 2017 postseason, helping Golden State capture its second title in three seasons. In eight career seasons with the Warriors, Curry owns averages of 22.8 points, 6.8 assists, 4.4 rebounds and 1.79 steals and is the franchise’s all-time leader in three-point field goals (1,917, 10th in NBA history).

Durant, 28, tallied averages of 25.1 points (13th), a career-high 8.3 rebounds, 4.8 assists, a career-high 1.60 blocks (ninth) and 1.06 steals in 33.4 minutes over 62 games in his first season with the Warriors in 2016-17. The 6’9” forward earned All-NBA Second Team honors after hitting a career-best 53.7 percent from the field and becoming the first Warrior to average at least 25 points and eight rebounds per game since Rick Barry in 1966-67. Durant led the Warriors in postseason scoring with 28.5 points per game to go along with 7.9 rebounds, 4.3 assists and 1.33 blocks in 15 games, scoring at least 30 points in all five games of the NBA Finals on his way to Finals MVP honors. Durant joined Michael Jordan as the only players to earn NBA Finals MVP honors with averages of at least 35 points (35.2), eight rebounds (8.2) and five assists (5.4).

Iguodala, 33, averaged 7.6 points, 4.0 rebounds, 3.4 assists and 1.00 steals in 26.3 minutes over 76 games for the Warriors in 2016-17, while shooting a career-high 52.8 percent. A 13-year NBA veteran, Iguodala led the NBA in assist-to-turnover ratio (4.50) and was a finalist for 2016-17 NBA Sixth Man of the Year honors, leading all reserves in plus/minus with an on-court differential of +6.9. The 2015 NBA Finals MVP scored a playoff season-high 20 points in Golden State’s series-clinching Game 5 win over Cleveland in the 2017 NBA Finals, hitting 9-of-14 from the field in 38 minutes.

Livingston, 31, shot a career-best 54.7 percent from the field and posted averages of 5.1 points, 2.0 rebounds and 1.8 assists in 17.7 minutes over 76 games in 2016-17. The 13-year NBA veteran upped his accuracy to 57.6 percent from the field in the postseason, averaging 5.2 points over 14 games and scoring in double figures three times (twice in the NBA Finals). Livingston owns career averages of 6.6 points, 3.2 assists and 2.5 rebounds in 698 games with nine different teams, including three seasons with Golden State.

Pachulia, 33, averaged 6.1 points, 5.9 rebounds and 1.9 assists in 18.1 minutes over 70 games (all starts) in his first season with the Warriors, while hitting a career-high 53.4 percent from the field. The Georgian native led all centers in plus/minus (+6.0) and led the Warriors with 140 offensive rebounds in 2016-17. In 15 postseason games (all starts), Pachulia averaged 5.1 points and 3.8 rebounds in 14.1 minutes, scoring in double figures four times. For his career, Pachulia owns averages of 7.0 points, 6.0 rebounds and 1.3 assists in 961 games over 14 seasons with the Magic, Hawks, Bucks, Mavericks and Warriors.

West, 36, tallied averages of 4.6 points, 3.0 rebounds and 2.2 assists in 12.6 minutes over 68 games in his first season with the Warriors. The 14-year NBA veteran was one of only four players to play in all 17 of Golden State’s playoff games, averaging 4.5 points, 2.7 rebounds and 2.1 assists, and 13.0 minutes in his eighth career postseason appearance. A two-time NBA All-Star, West owns career averages of 14.1 points, 6.6 rebounds and 2.2 assists in 961 games with the Hornets, Pacers, Spurs and Warriors.

Golden State Warriors media services

Myers: 'Unequivocally' there is no Iggy or Livingston without Durant

Myers: 'Unequivocally' there is no Iggy or Livingston without Durant

OAKLAND -- Bob Myers did not drop to his knees and thank Kevin Durant for the financial sacrifice that gave the Warriors the financial flexibility to retain the likes of Andre Iguodala and Shaun Livingston.

The team’s president/general manager came exceedingly close, though.

“His gesture of taking less gave us the ability to be very aggressive in pursuing Shaun and Andre,” Myers said Friday. “And I can pretty much unequivocally say without it, we’re not looking at the team we have right now.”

Upon opting out of the contract he signed last July -- a move that allowed the Warriors to utilize Bird rights to retain Iguodala and Livingston -- Durant could have demanded and gotten the maximum, roughly $34.8 million, to return to the Warriors next season.

The general belief was that Durant would accept $31.8 million, though league sources had informed NBCSportsBayArea.com that he would be flexible and was willing to go a few million lower than that.

Durant went nearly $6.8 million lower, re-signing for a deal that will pay him $25 million next season.

“(With) Kevin forgoing the max, which he obviously deserves and could’ve gotten from us or any team in the league, that allowed us to attempt to sign Andre and Shaun and not have to renounce them,” Myers said.

“What Kevin did shows who he is, shows what he’s about and it’s clear that that’s winning.”

The expectation is Durant will opt out of his new deal next summer and re-sign a long-term deal starting around $35 million and escalating well above $40 million.

The Warriors entered free agency last week with a projected cap on what they were willing to spend and still exceeded it, according to Myers. Their commitment to bringing back a successful core was greater than their desire to contain payroll.

And that was even with Durant’s assistance.

“To be honest, I would have never thought that Kevin and his business partner, Rich (Kleiman), would give us the opportunity to take less and allow us to be as aggressive,” Myers said. “I didn’t foresee that. But when given that opportunity we said, ‘Wow. Now we can go hard at bringing Shaun and Andre back quickly.”

Source: Warriors, Shaun Livingston agree to three-year deal

Source: Warriors, Shaun Livingston agree to three-year deal

Shaun Livingston barely stuck a toe into the free agency. He had his reasons.

The veteran point guard wanted to stay with the Warriors, because they have become family, and he wanted to stay in Oakland, because it has become home.

So Livingston and the Warriors struck a deal minutes after free agency began Friday night, agreeing to a three-year contract that could be worth as much as $24 million. No deal is official until July 6 at 9:01 a.m. PT. 

“You can’t put a price on happiness,” Livingston said in a text message to NBCSportsBayArea.com.

Livingston, who turns 32 in September, bought a home in Oakland and this year became a father for the first time. He played for eight other NBA teams before joining the Warriors on a three-year, $16.6-million deal as a free agent in July 2014.

The Warriors wanted flexibility, and Livingston and his representatives were willing to make a compromise on the third year. He’ll receive $8 million in each of the first two seasons, but has only a $2 million guarantee for the third year, according to multiple sources.

With Klay Thompson under contract and agreements with Stephen Curry and Livingston, the Warriors have assured themselves of retaining their top three guards from the past three seasons.