Tip led to arrest of suspect in Bryan Stow attack

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Tip led to arrest of suspect in Bryan Stow attack

May 22, 2011GIANTS PAGE GIANTS VIDEO

LOS ANGELES (APCSN) -- A tip from a parole officer led to the arrest of one of the suspects in the attack on Giants fan Bryan Stow outside Dodger Stadium after the rival teams' season opener, a brutal beating that prompted an outpouring of support for the victim and outrage in the sports world and beyond.

The suspect was identified by LAPD as 31-year-old Giovanni Ramirez of Los Angeles. He has been booked for assault with a deadly weapon and is being held on 1 million bail. It is unknown if Ramirez had hired an attorney, and police released no further information on him.
Ramirez, who was detained early Sunday, is believed to be the "main aggressor'' in the March 31 beating that left Stow with brain damage, Los Angeles Chief Charlie Beck said at an afternoon news conference at the stadium.
RELATED: Giants issue statement

Stow is a Santa Cruz resident. He's in critical condition at San Francisco General Hospital.

An emotional Beck hailed the work of 20 full-time detectives who he said have pursued 630 leads in the case so far. The police chief choked back tears as he described getting a call at 7 a.m. Sunday from Assistant Chief Earl Paysinger.

"He said the words I've been waiting for for seven weeks. He said that we had Bryan's assault suspect in custody,'' Beck said. "This is a huge step.''

It's unclear whether the others detained were possible witnesses or suspects in the March 31 beating that left Bryan Stow with brain damage, said police Sgt. Kunch, who declined to give his first name per department policy.

Several search warrants were served at an apartment building, Kunch said. Building manager Maritza Camacho told the Los Angeles Times that a SWAT team descended on the East Hollywood apartment using loudspeakers and with guns drawn.

Among the people taken out of the building was a man with a bald head and tattoos on his neck and arms, Camacho said, a description that appeared to match the vague sketches released by police of one of the two suspects.

Stow, a 42-year-old paramedic and father of two, was beaten in a parking lot by two men in Dodgers gear after the season opener against the Giants. No arrests have been made.

Last week, doctors reported that Stow is able to open his eyes. Stow had been at Los Angeles County-University of Southern California Medical Center since the attack that forced doctors to put him into a medically induced coma to avoid having seizures.

Police Chief Charlie Beck said recently that detectives are looking into about 500 leads in their search for the attackers. Rewards totaling more than 200,000 have been offered for information leading to the suspects' arrests.

Stow's sister said police called her family Sunday morning to inform them about the search warrants.

"I can't even tell you the emotions that we're going through right now,'' Bonnie Stow told KABC-TV, occasionally choking back tears. "To be excited is the least we can say.''

An outpouring of support for Stow included fundraisers that ranged from bowling tournaments to pasta dinners to donated services such as haircuts and fitness classes. The events are listed on the family's blog.

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee said after hearing the news Sunday he called Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa to express his thanks for the efforts of LA authorities and to congratulate him.

"That sort of brutality is totally unacceptable,'' Lee said of the attack. "It's not only unacceptable, but needs to be dealt with. Our hearts are still open for a full recovery of Mr. Stow.''

Giants manager Bruce Bochy said he heard Sunday morning that a suspect was in custody.

"Great news. It's been hard on the family,'' Bochy said before the Giants hosted Oakland. "For them to work as hard as they have been, I'm talking about the police department, to have a suspect in hand is great news. Hopefully they'll catch everybody who was involved in this senseless act.''

Giants team officials also released a statement commending Los Angeles police and thanking "the community for its tremendous support for the Stow family during this difficult time.''

Giants fan Les Wong, 37 of San Francisco celebrated the news as he headed to the game.

"It's good to hear that they caught someone. That kind of thing doesn't belong in sports,'' said Wong, who was wearing a Giants hat and Giants t-shirt. "I'm glad to hear there is going to be some sort of justice.''

Stow, who was wearing Giants gear, was leaving the game at Dodger Stadium with two friends when he was attacked. Moments earlier, Stow texted a family member to say he feared for his safety in the rowdy crowd.

Following the attack, Beck beefed up security at Dodger Stadium to deal with fights that had been breaking out at games in recent years.

Baseball fans have complained that anyone who dares to wear a rival team's jersey on Dodger turf has too-often been subjected to profane verbal abuse and threats of violence.

Matt Williams joins NBC Sports Bay Area's Giants TV coverage

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AP

Matt Williams joins NBC Sports Bay Area's Giants TV coverage

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — It has been 30 years since Matt Williams broke into the big leagues with the Giants, and he has been back many times in recent seasons as an opposing player, coach and manager. When the Giants play their home opener on April 10, Williams will once again be affiliated with them, this time in a new role. 

Williams will join NBC Sports Bay Area this season as a studio analyst for the pre- and post-game shows, which are expanding to one hour. After spending most of the last two decades in various on and off-field roles for the Arizona Diamondbacks, Williams is coming full circle with the Giants. 

“It feels like that, doesn’t it?” he said. “I love coaching and managing, but I also enjoy talking about the game and experiencing the game from that angle, which is a lot of fun. I really enjoy it. You get to talk about the intricacies of the game.”

Williams knows it inside and out, and not just because he played 17 seasons for the Giants, Diamondbacks and Indians. He has coached first and third base for the Diamondbacks, most recently during the 2016 season. When the organization retooled the front office in the offseason, changes were made to the coaching staff. Williams has also had a stint as a manager, doing two years with the Washington Nationals. He went 179-145, winning the NL Manager of the Year Award in 2014, when the Giants knocked the Nationals out of the postseason in the NLDS. 

Williams is best known in San Francisco for 10 strong years on the field. He hit 378 career home runs, 247 of them with the Giants. Williams is a five-time All-Star, four-time Silver Slugger winner and four-time Gold Glove winner, and he finished in the top five in the MVP voting in 1994 and 1999. While Williams was gone by the time a title drought was broken, he does have a ring to wear around the ballpark. He batted .275 with 16 homers for the champion Diamondbacks in 2001. 

Williams’ time in Arizona also included color commentary for their television and radio broadcasts, and he said he’s looking forward to working with former Giants players he has coached against, and fellow former coach Tim Flannery, who was an NL West rival in the late 1980s. 

“During the offseason, this is always one of my favorite cities to visit,” he said. “It’s home. I’ve been in the Bay Area practically my whole life. It’s a fantastic atmosphere in the ballpark with a great fan base, and the Giants’ recent success has been phenomenal.” 

The Giants plan on that success carrying over into the odd year, and one of the best infielders in franchise history will be along for the ride. 

York: 49ers do not expect short-term benefits from Raiders' move to Vegas

York: 49ers do not expect short-term benefits from Raiders' move to Vegas

PHOENIX – CEO Jed York said he does not expect the Raiders’ move to Las Vegas to have a significant short-term benefit for the 49ers.

After all, there appears to be a clear delineation between the two fan bases.

“The easy thing to say is this is a great financial gain for the 49ers, which just isn’t the case,” York said from the NFL owners meetings on the 49ers Insider Podcast.

The Raiders moved from Oakland to Los Angeles in 1982, leaving the 49ers as the only NFL act in the Bay Area for 13 seasons. During that time the 49ers won four Super Bowls. But there were few tangible benefits to the 49ers that were directly associated with the Raiders' absence from the market.

“You did not see a huge increase in ticket revenue, sponsorship revenue, even in terms of overall exposure in the market, because I think Raiders fans and 49ers fans are just a different group of folks,” York said. “The Raiders fans aren’t necessarily loyal to a certain geographic location. They’re loyal to the Raiders. I think you’ll see those fans follow the Raiders to Las Vegas.”

York said “20-plus percent” of the 49ers’ season-ticket holders live in Alameda County. He said the only change he envisions would be the expansion of some of the 49ers’ philanthropic efforts to some of the East Bay’s underserved communities.

The 49ers’ home, Levi’s Stadium, was built with the design of accommodating two home teams. While the NFL might have preferred the 49ers and Raiders to forge a relationship with a shared stadium, like the New York Giants and Jets, the Raiders never seriously considered a move to the South Bay.

“We had the conversation with Mark (Davis), but when the stadium was up and running in Santa Clara, and Levi’s was really going, it really is the 49ers’ stadium,” York said. “I think there was a little hesitancy of truly being a tenant in somebody else’s stadium, which certainly makes sense that it wasn’t high on their priority list.”

The Raiders figure to remain in the Bay Area for three seasons until their new home in Southern Nevada is ready for NFL action. The Raiders have a lease at the Oakland Coliseum for the 2017 and ’18 seasons. Davis expressed a preference to extend the lease to 2019.

The 49ers would be open to discussing the possibility of the Raiders’ use of Levi’s Stadium – seemingly as a last resort for both sides.

“If that was an opportunity, we’d certainly sit down and discuss it,” York said. “But I think there are a lot of moving pieces right now and it’s really conjecture to talk about 2019 at this point when they’d still obviously prefer to stay at the Coliseum.”