The Titans' owner is not happy at all

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The Titans' owner is not happy at all

From Comcast SportsNetThe Tennessee Titans now have plenty of motivation to play better. Owner Bud Adams has made sure of that.The owner plans to evaluate everyone from the front office to the coaches to the players over the final seven games after the Titans lost 51-20 to Chicago, the most points allowed since a 59-0 loss to New England in 2009."In my 50 years of owning an NFL franchise, I am at a loss to recall a regular-season home game that was such a disappointment for myself and fans of the Titans," Adams told The Tennessean. "We were grossly outcoached and outplayed from start to finish."Coach Mike Munchak talked with Adams on Monday and said he understands the owner's frustration."I would probably have said the same thing if I were him," Munchak said. "This is his team. He expects us to play well, especially at home. That's our job. That's my job to make sure we're out there playing our best and winning games at home hopefully every time we line up."We didn't play well, and I'd be upset too if I were him."The Titans (3-6) didn't just look bad in the loss to the Bears, they looked inept with five turnovers. Even Chris Johnson, who had one fumble touching the ball 150 times coming into the game, lost two himself. They struggled to tackle with safety Michael Griffin dragged about 20 yards by Matt Forte before finally bringing the running back down with a horse collar tackle.They lined up incorrectly on back-to-back plays covering up the tight end, backing them up before getting a punt blocked and returned for a touchdown."The bottom line is it shouldn't happen," Munchak said of the formation penalties.Tennessee once again is last in the NFL giving up an average 34.2 points per game and remain on pace to top the 533 points allowed by the 1981 Baltimore Colts. The Titans already have given up 308 points through nine games after allowing only 317 points all last season.Adams can share some of the blame for the defense's struggles.The owner ordered his Titans to chase four-time NFL MVP Peyton Manning in March, and that kept team officials busy for the first week of free agency. Sure, they signed veteran left guard Steve Hutchinson while they tried to woo Manning into picking Tennessee, but defensive ends Mario Williams and John Abraham signed elsewhere.That left the Titans to sign Kamerion Wimbley, who had played linebacker in Oakland before they switched him to defensive end. Wimbley has 3.5 sacks so far on a defense that has just 14 overall.The Titans started the season with their youngest opening day roster since 2006, a team that went 8-8 after losing the first five games that season.The defense is where the youth movement of the last two drafts shows up the most with two of the three starting linebackers in their second season along with rookie Zach Brown. Tackle Jurrell Casey is another defender in his second season, while end Derrick Morgan and cornerback Alterraun Verner are in their third.Munchak said he is not planning any staff changes right now."We have to win football games right now. I'm not spending my time deciding on making coaching changes, and no, I'm not thinking of doing that."The Titans visit Miami (4-4) on Sunday before a break with their bye. They may get Jake Locker back as their starting quarterback depending on what doctors say about his left, non-throwing shoulder. Locker has missed five straight games since dislocating his shoulder Sept. 30 for the second time in four games.Munchak said the key is when Locker is cleared for contact, and the quarterback worked with the scout team last week. The coach said they should know more by Wednesday. In the meantime, Munchak said he isn't the type to flip coolers or start yelling since that tactic never prompted him to play harder or better himself."My job is to focus them, direct them, teach them and try to get the best out of them, and that's what I'm trying to do," Munchak said.

Here's to hoping Marshawn Lynch upstages the NFL Draft

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AP

Here's to hoping Marshawn Lynch upstages the NFL Draft

Marshawn Lynch is going to upstage the NFL Draft for a few moments by announcing his signing with the Oakland Raiders Thursday.

The problem with this is obvious. He can’t upstage it all day long.

The NFL Draft is one of those events that demeans all who come in contact with it, because it basically extols the three virtues the owners find most inspiring – dishonesty, bullying and treachery. Between everyone lying about everything they do, making players submit to the most revolting reputational indignities, and just good old-fashioned broken promises like, “If you’re there at 119, we’re taking you, oh wait, we suddenly hate you and your skill set,” the draft is largely a festival of misery.

Not universally, mind you. Some players love it, especially the ones who hit the lottery, get picked higher than they thought they would and go to the perfect team for their talents and temperaments. That’s not the usual road, but there you go.

But mostly, nah. And we’re not even getting into the cavalcade of media self-anointeds who think they know what they’re talking about but only serve to remind us that not everybody is a fun companion in a bar.

Now the disclaimer: If you like the NFL Draft, fine. Wallow in every minute of it with our blessing. It'll keep you from all level of other mischief, and it is relatively harmless fun if you can deal with the aesthetic unpleasantries to which we just referred. Just understand that you are spending 356 minutes of party prep for three days of partying and six days of cleanup. It's a hamster wheel of fun, but it is a hamster wheel.

But then there's Marshawn Lynch, who overcame being one of those draft casualties (because Buffalo didn’t work for him, and he didn’t work all that well for Buffalo, either), is coming out of retirement to be traded and then rendered a Raider in the time still allotted for them to reside in Oakland. As a distraction, this will play well enough. It sure beats DeMarcus Cousins being traded by Sacramento during the NBA All-Star Game.

I suppose this is a heart-rending tale of one man’s loyalty to his city (the right place at the right price), although there is the naggingly worrisome component that going back to football won’t be good for his overall health. It is the risk he runs, to be sure, and one can only assume that he has made a clearheaded choice, but this is not a spot that treats its recidivists well.

That’s recidivists, as in “folks who walked away happily, then found out they needed it too much for their own good.”

Frankly, there is no good reason not to want this to turn out well for Lynch (the Raiders can take of themselves with or without him, and within two years will do exactly that), but it is a case of bucking some daunting odds in what is too often a zero-sum game. That’s a level of risk that should make anyone queasy.

But it is what Marshawn Lynch wants, risks and all, and as a grown adult he should get the opportunity few are afforded – to chase and catch his dream until it stops being a dream and becomes a chore.

If it works out for the Raiders as well, fine. Lynch isn’t the one who will put them over the top in a conference dominated by three teams – New England, the Patriots and Bill Belichick – but if he finds the athletic closure he seeks, it ought to be good enough for the rest of us.

Especially if it even momentarily minimizes the rest of the hot rhetorical/gasbaggy mess that is Draft Night. If nothing else, here’s hoping Marshawn Lynch is the star of the night. That’s not the way to bet, of course, but a person can hope.

Source: Marshawn Lynch set to join Raiders, pending physical

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AP

Source: Marshawn Lynch set to join Raiders, pending physical

Running back is no longer a pressing Raiders need. They eliminated it just before this NFL draft by acquiring a good one for the team, a great one for the East Bay Raiders fan base.

Marshawn Lynch is going to wear Silver and Black.

The powerful running back and proud Oakland native has agreed to terms on a contract with the Raiders, a league source with knowledge of the situation confirmed on Wednesday morning.

The Raiders have also acquired his rights from Seattle in trade.

The deal and the trade is contingent on a physical. Lynch is expected at Raiders complex Wednesday to complete that formality and sign a contract to make everything official.

The news was first reported by NFL Network’s Ian Rapoport and Mike Garafolo before dawn Wednesday morning.

NFL Network reports Lynch agreed to a two-year contract worth $8.5 million. He's set to make a $3 million base salary in 2017. He can earn another another $2 million coming if he reaches 1,000 yards. 

The Seahawks and Raiders will swap 2018 draft picks to complete the trade. According to USA Today, Seattle receives Oakland's fifth-round pick next year in exchange for Lynch and their sixth round pick next year.

The Oakland Tech High grad and Cal alum retired from NFL football after the 2015 season, but wanted to return after a year away from the game. The 31-year old only wanted to return for his hometown team, and got his wish after prolonged contract talks.

A union is now a completed physical away from becoming complete. 

Raiders players were overjoyed at the news before that, including quarterback Derek Carr.

Former Seahawks teammate Bruce Irvin, who has been championing the Lynch-to-Oakland cause for weeks now, was thrilled to see Lynch join the squad.

Lynch is not expected to be a Las Vegas Raider. His contract runs through the 2018 season. The Raiders plan to play in the Bay Area until their new Las Vegas stadium is complete in 2020. They have lease options to play at Oakland Colsieum through the 2018 season.