Did Jerry West rule out drafting Andre Drummond?

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Did Jerry West rule out drafting Andre Drummond?

Jerry West has beenaround the NBA too long to go onto a sports talk show and tell everyone whichplayer the Warriors will draft with the No. 7 pick on Thursday.Then again, thething about West is you ask him a question and youre going to get an answer.Hes direct and hes forthright, and hes not big on skirting issues.Its why your earshad to perk up when he had this to say about what the Warriors are thinking oneday before the draft.We dont want a player youre going tohave to wait on for two years, West said on Chronicle Live. We want someonewho can play right away.RELATED: Steinmetz's comprehensive draft coverage
That would seem tosuggest the Warriors wont be drafting 18-year-old center, and noted project,Andre Drummond. Many believe Drummond, who played one year at Connecticut, willbe available when the Warriors pick.But hes ahigh-risk, high-reward player and it just doesnt seem like West is a big fanof going in that direction. Not at this time, anyway, for the Warriors.Here, we needsomeone who can play right away, provide something we dont have, West said.But more importantly, be a valuable asset going forward.So, who is thatplayer?Well, if you listento what West has to say on that subject, maybe you get the sense theyre tryingto move up to get Michael Kidd-Gilchrist or go with Dion Waiters at No. 7, ormaybe move back to get a player such as Moe Harkless.Were readingbetween the lines here, but hey, thats what you do at this time ofyear.Let me tell you something,the most difficult players to find are dirty-work players, West said. And Idont mean that in the sense of beating people up. I mean that every singlenight you know theyre going to compete.One of the things,I think, this team really lacks is toughness. This year were going to get sometoughness.That doesn't sound like a smoke screen. We'll find out Thursday.

Warriors to celebrate 'We Believe' team at Game 1 of Western Semifinals

Warriors to celebrate 'We Believe' team at Game 1 of Western Semifinals

OAKLAND, CA – The Golden State Warriors will celebrate the 2007 “We Believe” team on Tuesday, May 2, during Game 1 of their Conference Semifinals series at Oracle Arena, the team announced Sunday.  The celebration takes place one day shy of the 10-year anniversary of the 2006-07 Warriors completing their historic First Round upset over the #1 seeded Dallas Mavericks on May 3, 2007, when they posted a 111-86 victory in Game 6 at Oracle Arena to become the first #8 seed to prevail over a #1 seed in a best-of-seven series.

Several members of that iconic Warriors team will be on-hand for the celebration, including Baron Davis, Stephen Jackson, Jason Richardson, Monta Ellis, Al Harrington, Kelenna Azubuike, Adonal Foyle, Patrick O’Bryant and Zarko Cabarkapa.  Another member of that team, Matt Barnes, is currently playing for the Warriors.

To help celebrate the occasion, limited-edition “We Believe” 10-Year Anniversary t-shirts will be available for purchase at WarriorsTeamStore.com starting Tuesday morning, and at Oracle Arena beginning on Tuesday night.  These special gold t-shirts feature the same “We Believe” logo that was emblazoned across the front of the fan t-shirts given away at Oracle Arena throughout the 2007 NBA Playoffs, with a special 10-year logo on the sleeve. 

Led by Head Coach Don Nelson, the 2006-07 Warriors finished the regular-season with a 16-5 record over their final 21 games to finish with a 42-40 record and claim the #8 seed in the Western Conference Playoffs, marking the team’s first winning season and postseason appearance in 13 years. Facing the heavily favored Mavericks, who finished the regular-season with an NBA-best 67 wins, Golden State won Game 1 in Dallas to steal home court advantage and returned to the Bay Area with the series tied 1-1.  Having waited more than a dozen years to host a Playoff game, Warriors fans packed Oracle Arena long before tip-off of Game 3 and roared as the Warriors won Games 3 & 4 at home.  After falling in Game 5 at Dallas, the Warriors returned to Oracle Arena and over 20,000 fans wearing their gold “We Believe” t-shirts for Game 6.  Holding a two-point lead early in the third quarter, the Warriors went on a 24-3 run that blew the game open in an eventual 25-point series-ending victory.

Limited tickets for the We Believe Celebration and all home games during the Western Conference Semifinals are still available. Fans looking to attend Warriors games during the 2017 NBA Playoffs are encouraged to purchase tickets directly from the team by visiting warriors.com, calling 1-888-GSW-HOOP or at the Oracle Arena Box Office. Warriors.com offers fans the only verified marketplace for all Warriors ticket needs, including official resale tickets from Season Ticket Holders and other fans, that is guaranteed by the Warriors organization. The Warriors resale marketplace offers a safe and convenient way for fans to access all levels of tickets throughout the regular season and playoffs. The Warriors have sold out 232 consecutive games at Oracle Arena and currently have a Season Ticket Priority Wait List of over 39,000 members.

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Livingston on Kerr: 'He’s our leader ... somebody that we count on'

Livingston on Kerr: 'He’s our leader ... somebody that we count on'

OAKLAND -- Though much has been said about the agonies and challenges facing Steve Kerr, including speculation about when, or if, he’ll return as head coach of the Warriors, little has been put into words that capture the significance of his absence.

This is perhaps because it can be difficult to explain how one man is able to influence a roster of supremely talented athletes, at the wealthiest point of life, with wildly divergent personalities, at different career stages.

Veteran guard Shaun Livingston, a man who knows perspective as well as anyone in the NBA, took a moment Saturday to cut through the palaver and pity to offer a clear and vivid illustration of Kerr’s value as a man and as a coach.

“It’s just his presence, his personality,” Livingston began. “His character, the way he fits in with us. He’s kind of the battery pack, in the sense that he makes everybody go. He keeps us all (in harmony), everybody from staff, training staff, coaching staff to the players.

“He bridges the gaps, in the sense of communication, and he makes it light.”

In short, Kerr’s value to the franchise is far greater than his duties as a coach. He has an easy, breezy charisma insofar as he’s so comfortable submerging his own ego while being remarkably good at making everyone matter.

Moreover, Kerr is decidedly inclusive, explicitly emphatically open to ideas. He’s an outreach specialist whose sensibilities are contagious.

All of which helps create a sprightly and genial workplace, something the Warriors sought when they hired Kerr to replace the swaggering and dogmatic Mark Jackson in May 2014.

“Every day it’s something new, in a sense, and that’s hard to do,” Livingston said. “We’re here for six to nine months for the past couple years, seeing the same faces. So it is kind of like a job. But (Kerr) makes it more like a game and tries to make sure we’re enjoying ourselves out there.”

Kerr wants to live his life and coach basketball around four basic tenets: joy, mindfulness, compassion and competition. Maintaining a balance of the four can be difficult, especially when Kerr is dealing with the searing pain that has him on the sideline for an indefinite period.

But Kerr never strays far. His players seem to see and, more important, feel that.

Draymond Green and Kerr, each volatile in his own way, don’t always see eye-to-eye. Yet Green on several occasions has noted that Kerr “always seems to find the right thing to say, at the right time.”

Veteran David West points out that anyone who spends any time around Kerr can sense his basic humanity. Veteran Andre Iguodala, one of the team’s co-captains, speaks of Kerr’s curiosity and desire to broaden his horizons.

Stephen Curry, the other co-captain, kept the ball from the Warriors’ Game 4 win over Portland last Monday night, punctuating a series sweep, and gave it to Kerr, who missed Games 3 and 4 while coping with this prolonged post-surgery pain.

Lead assistant Mike Brown, the acting head coach in Kerr’s absence, concedes he has benefited from being around Kerr and this team.

“The tone he sets is the best I’ve been around,” said Brown, who has been involved in the NBA since 1992. “This is a special, special situation, and he’s big reason why.”

So it’s not just Livingston who throwing rose petals at the boss. He just happened to convey in a few words the effect Kerr has on the team and within the building.

“He’s our leader,” Livingston said. “He’s somebody that we count on.”