Golden State GM Myers addresses Warriors free agents

Golden State GM Myers addresses Warriors free agents

They are favored to win it all, and maybe they will. Perhaps, as some speculate, they will flame out in the postseason.

Either way, watching the rebooted Warriors often leads to a nagging question:

Is this a one-and-done roster?

Not if general manager Bob Myers is able to work some summer magic.

“We’ve got 10 free agents; there are a lot of balls to juggle in the offseason,” Myers said Friday on the Warriors Insider Podcast. “That’s good, though, because I think we’ve developed a culture where players want to stay.”

Kevin Durant arrived last summer and can opt out this summer, though indications are he wants to stay. Though other free agents include Ian Clark, JaVale McGee, Zaza Pachulia and David West, Myers specifically addressed three core veterans: Stephen Curry, Andre Iguodala and Shaun Livingston.

After initially joking that he was “not sure” about the desire to re-sign Curry, Myers delivered the predictable answer: “For the record: We would love to have Steph Curry, going forward. Hopefully, he feels the same way. I think he does.”

Curry has consistently stated his desire to remain with the Warriors. Barring a shocking and catastrophic turn of events, that’s going to get done.

Iguodala and Livingston, however, are a bit trickier. Though both are key members of the team, neither is a starter. And both will be entering their 14th season.

“We’d love to keep them, and I’ve told them that,” Myers said. “We’d like to try to make it work. We have to approach it with what’s in our control, and that’s trying to find a way to keep them on the team. They’re not just really good players; they’re unbelievable people. So we’ll do everything we can.”

Myers conceded, too, that the unique skills possessed by Iguodala and Livingston make them difficult to replace. Even though the salary cap will rise slightly, along with the luxury-tax line, there are no guarantees.

“But you’re going to try,” Myers said. “But, conversely, there are times -- not with those guys -- but other times you’re looking at your roster, in any sport, and you go, ‘Yeah, we’ll probably let that guy go.’ That’s not the case at all.”

Perhaps foreseeing the summer -- or recalling the pursuit of Durant last summer -- Myers shifted into something that sounded like a recruiting pitch that could apply to players currently on the roster or those who might be on the market.

“They love playing for Steve,” he said. “We try to treat them fairly. We try to treat them as well as we can and provide them with all the resources to win and stay healthy and the environment of being in the Bay Area, and all the things outside of basketball that, shockingly, people may not realize players care about that are outside of the walls of the gym.

“This community, the diversity, the opportunity, the entrepreneurship, it’s a great place to sell to a player. But they really want to win. And I think we’ve shown we can win. So, hopefully, that gives us at least a good shot at keeping guys and then acquiring guys.”

Agony still present, Kerr uncertain if he can coach Warriors in NBA Finals

Agony still present, Kerr uncertain if he can coach Warriors in NBA Finals

SAN ANTONIO -- Those following the Warriors and their effort to rage through the playoffs should put away those thoughts and hopes that Steve Kerr will return to full-time coaching later this week or sometime before the NBA Finals.

Forget about it, unless you know something he doesn’t.

And if you do, he wants to hear what you have to say.

Don’t get it wrong: Kerr wants to coach, would love to coach. That’s why, even as he feels like hell, he’s hanging around the team like a languid groupie. He wants to be with the Warriors in the heat of battle because they’re his team, within the culture he instilled, and he would like nothing more to get another chance to win The Finals.

But because the procedure he underwent more than two weeks ago at Duke Spine Center did not deliver the relief he’d hoped for, Kerr knows he’s not up to the task and, therefore, continues to operate as sort of a associate head coach to acting head coach Mike Brown.

“Mike is doing great,” Kerr told NBCSportsBayArea.com late Monday night, after the Warriors clinched a third consecutive trip to the NBA Finals with a 129-115 Game 4 win over the Spurs. “He’s such a wonderful human being. He’s so unselfish and team-oriented. I’m proud of him and the job he’s doing, along with the rest of the staff. I wish I could be out there with them. And maybe I will. I don’t know. We’ll see.

“He’s a great partner. And we’re in this together, obviously, but he’s got to make decisions with the staff without me. He’s done a great job of navigating the games. We’re undefeated, so he’s doing something right.”

Kerr can only help from the perimeter. The demands of the job require the coach be able to function at near-peak levels, particularly before and during a game, and he simply can’t. He knows there will be times, all too often, when the discomfort becomes unbearable to such a degree he hardly can think straight.

The agony is visible. The players see it. The staff sees it. Brown sees it, feels it and hears it. Spurs coach Gregg Popovich is one of Kerr’s best friends -- as well as a good friend of Brown -- was able to see it during the Western Conference Finals.

“I've spoken with Steve and Mike; we're friends,” Popovich said two hours before Game 4. “We've known each other a long time. But as far as Steve's concerned, it's just a crap situation.

“You know, he's done a phenomenal job. And when you're going through that pain every day and that frustration of not being able to do what you want to do, it's hard to enjoy it at the fullest level. So I feel badly for him all the time but hopeful that stuff will get figured out.”

Nobody wants that more than Kerr, who has tried nearly everything any respectable specialist has recommended. So far, there has been no miracle.

So Kerr forges ahead, getting his Warriors fix by being around the group. By meeting with coaches and players. By meeting with general manager Bob Myers. Kerr was with the Warriors throughout their stay in San Antonio. He was at practices and shootarounds, sometimes on the floor and sometimes sitting in the stands observing from afar.

“I need to be around the guys,” he said. “I don’t want to miss this. Just being in the locker room, being able to talk to the guys means a lot to me. I’m thrilled for them. It’s fun to see how happy they are with three straight trips to The Finals. It’s pretty incredible.”

Kerr has been with the team for at least a few hours every day since May 10, less than a week after his procedure at Duke.

Kerr’s presence has been invaluable, both physically and psychologically, according to staff and players.

“Coach just empowers everybody,” Kevin Durant said. “His message is still the same. Even when he wasn't there in the Utah series, you could still feel his presence. That's what great leaders do.”

Participation, making himself feel useful, is one form of therapy that gives Kerr a semi-satisfying break from the misery.

“He watches film, and he watches the game,” Brown said. “So he gives his perspective from where he is. He gives insight on what we should be doing going forward, what he felt we could have done better, what we did that was good. So he just gives his input, mainly. He addresses the team every once in a while. He doesn't always do that, but he'll address the team from time to time.”

There was some belief that Kerr could return to full-time coaching within a week or so after the procedure, for which he declined to provide details. Warriors CEO Joe Lacob expressed hope Kerr might return “sooner rather than later.” Had it been as successful as Kerr and the doctors hoped, he would have.

That was May 5. Kerr announced he was stepping aside on April 23. As of Wednesday, he was been on leave for a full month.

Asked if he plans to travel during the NBA Finals, Kerr said he hopes so: “It’s like a month away,” he said, exaggerating the nine-day layoff.

He’d rather say with certainty that, yes, he will be accompanying the team because, after all, he’s the head coach.

And he will say that, the moment his body tells him it’s OK to do so.

Warriors happy to be back in NBA Finals, but not ready to celebrate yet

Warriors happy to be back in NBA Finals, but not ready to celebrate yet

SAN ANTONIO — There wasn’t much of a celebration. No crackling streams of cacophonous noise from the locker room, no dancing, no singing that could be heard through the walls of the visiting team’s locker room at AT&T Center.

There were but two visible signs of achievement. They were presented with a trophy for winning the Western Conference Finals, and they wore black caps signifying their presence in the upcoming 2017 NBA Finals.

Aside from that, the Warriors, invincible over the past five weeks, were as outwardly sober as a pair of penny loafers.

“Don't get me wrong: we appreciate this opportunity,” Stephen Curry said after sweeping the Spurs with a 129-115 victory in Game 4 Monday night. “Playing in this league, you can't take anything for granted. Thirty teams suit up every year trying to get to this point, and only two teams do. So you have to appreciate it.

“We might not be jumping up and down and screaming at the top of our lungs and doing all that nonsense, but we need to understand the privilege that we have and the opportunity that we have to play in The Finals again, to have the opportunity to win a championship.”

That’s what three consecutive trips to The Finals, following three fabulous regular seasons have done to the franchise that, not so long ago, the NBA barely recognized. From perennial lottery picks, and generally failing once there, to the pinnacle of the game with regularity.

The Warriors have advanced from hoping to make the playoffs to earning three straight trips to The Finals for the first time in franchise history to a mental state where anything less than a championship is bitter disappointment.

And they have been so magnificent through the first three quarters of these playoffs. The Warriors are the first team to open the postseason with three consecutive four-game sweeps and the first to post a 12-0 record at any point of the postseason.

“(Being) 12-0 is great,” Curry said, “but it doesn't mean anything going into the next series, and we have to understand that.”

The next series, The Finals, represents a major part of the equation for the Warriors. Getting back is one thing, getting back to face Cleveland would be quite another. Getting back to face Cleveland, and winning, would be nirvana.

“It's good that we're here now,” Kevin Durant said. “Obviously, we want to take that to the next series and try to be great and see what happens. But like Steph said, 12-0 really doesn't matter going into the next series. We know it's going to be a battle.”

The Warriors will take two days, Tuesday and Wednesday, away from the game to savor the most impressive start to a postseason the league has ever seen. The Finals don’t start until June 1.

That’s nine days away, so they have enough time for two haircuts, four picnics and dozen massages. A belated champagne celebration, if they desire.

But the feeling is they don’t. That they want to save such a lavish ceremony for the victory that leads to the parade and the rings. Postseason sweeps are a wondrous thing, but utterly insignificant if they don’t lead to the top.

“Like I said before, it's about winning the championship, and we're four games away from that,” Draymond Green said. “Now, if that's 4-0, great? If it's 4-3, great. It doesn't matter how you get those four wins as long as you get them, and that's our goal.”

On this night, the goal was to vanquish the Spurs, to send them home without a single victory. Done. The Warriors scored 498 points during the series, tying the 1978 76ers for the most points a team has scored in a four-game series. Curry reset his record for most 3-pointers in a four-game series with 21.

“Well, obviously it's something you're going to appreciate,” Green said of the accomplishments thus far. “You try not to take it for granted because it just doesn't happen every year where you're headed to the NBA Finals. So you appreciate it.

“But you can definitely sense a little different type of feeling where it's great and everybody's excited about it. But you just see a difference and it's still kind of a business-as-usual, we're-not-finished type of attitude, which is great.”

The Warriors are on top of the basketball world, if only for the moment. And it’s the for the moment part that they seem to fully grasp. And, for them, this is not the moment for celebration.