Hatred always finds Clippers' Redick

Hatred always finds Clippers' Redick
April 24, 2014, 6:45 am
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He's used to being booed. I should have him give our team a speech on how to handle it.
Doc Rivers on J.J. Redick

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During a session with reporters in Los Angeles on Wednesday, Clippers guard J.J. Redick shared a few moments from his past, which provided a glimpse into why he may not be fazed by a vociferous pro-Warriors crowd at Oracle Arena.

He has become accustomed to the stings of boos and hisses and hatred.

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Redick briefly relived the story of draft-day experience in New York, when he and his sister left the hotel for a quick shopping trip. The crowd, recognizing the Duke star, unleashed a torrent of verbal abuse.

"Within three blocks, she was crying,'' he said of his sister. "People were just saying the meanest things to me. And I'm just like, 'Ahh, this is what I've had to deal with for the past four years.'''

Redick during his years at Duke was a constant target of vitriol from opposing crowds. Blue Devils basketball may be the most polarizing program in college sports, and their best player, which Redick was for most of his time at Duke, often the least popular figure on the road.

"Part of it is just the Duke thing,'' Redick said. "There's just animosity toward Duke. If I had played at Florida or Texas, I might have gotten it. But I don't know if I'd have gotten it at the level I did.''

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He can expect similar treatment at Oracle on Thursday night, when the Clippers visit the Warriors for Game 3 of their first-round playoff series. Redick may not get it as loudly as, say, teammate Blake Griffin, but he should know it's coming.

"He's one of the most hated college players of all time,'' Los Angeles coach Doc Rivers said. "He's used to being booed. I should have him give our team a speech on how to handle it.''