Warriors

Ian Clark: 'I couldn’t do too much of that in Golden State'

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Ian Clark: 'I couldn’t do too much of that in Golden State'

Ian Clark is no longer on the Warriors.

It took him awhile to find a new home, but on Aug. 1, Clark agreed to terms on a one-year minimum deal (just below $1.6 million) with New Orleans.

“Being able to show what I can do in the minutes I get, I want to be able to expand on that this year,” Clark told the Pelicans' team website. “I want to show that I can do that in extended minutes and be consistent at it, and help my team win, whether that’s on the defensive or offensive end.

"I want to show that it wasn’t just because of that team."

Oh yes. "That team." The 2016-17 Warriors -- who went 67-15 during the regular season and nearly swept through the playoffs.

Clark averaged 6.8 points and 1.2 assists over 14.8 minutes per game last year.

He will have an opportunity to carve out a bigger role with the Pelicans.

“Utilizing my shooting and scoring ability is something I do well,” Clark said. “I’ve never really been a true point guard, but handling the ball and initiating offense are things I can do. I couldn’t do too much of that in Golden State, but that’s how I view myself.

"Also being able to defend multiple positions is important. Obviously there are bigger wings in the league, so being able to make sure I can defend different matchups is something that can help the team.

“I’ll do whatever the team needs. It all depends on the lineups we have on the floor. We have other guys here who are pure point guards who can play that position very well, but also slide over to the two.”

When Clark says, "obviously there are bigger wings in the league," it's both factual and important to keep in mind as it relates to the Warriors' roster.

Steve Kerr recently told Marcus Thompson of The Athletic:

"We’re going to miss Ian (Clark). We love Ian, and he fit in so well. But we had a chance to get bigger at that position and, as you know, we love our 6-7 guys.”

Warriors fans will get their first look at Clark in a Pelicans uniform early in the season, as Golden State plays at New Orleans on Oct. 20 -- the second game of the season.

Drew Shiller is the co-host of Warriors Outsiders and a Web Producer at NBC Sports Bay Area. Follow him on Twitter @DrewShiller

The Warriors' pending luxury tax bills might pinch a good deal more

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The Warriors' pending luxury tax bills might pinch a good deal more

There is no compelling reason why you should necessarily believe, let alone care about, the exhaustive ESPN story about 14 NBA teams losing money in these flush times (or ten, or nine, depending on what numbers you use).

But at some point the Golden State Warriors might have to do so.

The report is a head-scratcher not because the authors, Brian Windhorst and Zach Lowe, don’t know what they’re doing – quite the contrary. They are very good at what they do. But it is because the NBA has never had more money at its disposal, even after all the massive player contracts they have paid out in The Great Money Burn, and has, as owners are wont to do, decided to fight over how all that money is distributed.

The Warriors are among the league’s best earners ($91.9 million profit a year ago, even after paying $42 million in revenue sharing), but if 143 (or 10, or nine) teams are losing money after the $24 billion TV deal that crazed them all, all of a sudden the Oakland economic juggernaut might well find itself with significantly less.

Not enough for you to care, necessarily, but enough that their pending luxury tax bills might pinch a good deal more than they already do, and enough that their new arena turn from loss to profit might be delayed.

The ESPN report is careful to point out that other arena income isn’t factored into these numbers, and the old canard that there are always three sets of books – one for the tax man, one for your partners and the true one – has never been more useful. In short, without knowing the source of documents Lowe and Windhorst received, we cannot educatedly speculate on the motive behind the leak.

The Warriors will be fine no matter whether the league decides to make sure all teams are genuinely profitable every year by recalibrating revenue sharing or tax payments. They have gone from a fringe operation economically to one of the industry leaders (the Los Angeles Lakers and New York Knickerbockers are still the king and prince regent of this royal family).

But the only thing that makes billionaires itchier than having “not enough” money is watching one of their partners having what they consider “too much” money. Which is to say, more money than they themselves do. The boardroom battle over that will begin shortly, if it hasn’t already started.

Money’s funny that way. After all, if there’s one last quarter heading toward a sewer grate, there will be 50 well-dressed middle-aged and old men bashing heads in unison trying to grab it before it falls.

Kevin Durant addresses his deleted tweets: 'Childish, idiotic'

Kevin Durant addresses his deleted tweets: 'Childish, idiotic'

On Sunday night, Kevin Durant got himself into some trouble on Twitter.

A fan tweeted at him: "Man I respect the hell outta you but give me one legitimate reason for leaving okc other than getting a championship."

Durant's first tweet: "he didn't like the organization or playing for Billy Donovan. His roster wasn't that good, it was just him and russ."

[RELATED: Durant deletes tweets critical of Thunder, OKC players, Billy Donovan]

Durant's second tweet: 'imagine taking russ off that team, see how bad they are. Kd can't win a championship with those cats."

Soon thereafter, Durant deleted the tweets.

On Tuesday morning, Durant was a guest at Tech Crunch in San Francisco and was asked about the incident.

"I do have another Instagram account, but that's just for my friends and family. I wouldn't say I was using that to clap back at anybody. But I use Twitter to engage with the fans. I think it's a great way to engage with basketball fans.

"But I happened to take it a little too far. And that's what happens sometimes when I get into these basketball debates ... I don't regret at clapping back at anybody or talking to my fans on Twitter. I do regret using my former coach's name and the former organization I played for.

"That was childish, that was idiotic; all those type of words. I regret doing that and I apologized to him for doing that. But I don't think I'll ever stop engaging with my fans. I think they really enjoy it and I think it's a good way to connect us all.

"I will scale back a little bit right now. Just focus on playing basketball. I want to move on from that. It was tough to deal with yesterday. I was really upset with myself."

Drew Shiller is the co-host of Warriors Outsiders and a Web Producer at NBC Sports Bay Area. Follow him on Twitter @DrewShiller