Instant Replay: Warriors 115, Bobcats 100


Instant Replay: Warriors 115, Bobcats 100


ORACLE ARENA – You don’t sense even the slightest drip of nervous tension as Klay Thompson sits back in his locker room chair an hour before tip-off.

The 22-year-old So-Cal kid looks plenty relaxed, more likely to grab a video game controller than an NBA basketball.

But before going on to score 20 points in the Warriors’ 115-100 win against the visiting Charlotte Bobcats on Friday night, Thompson admitted he still gets that twinge of nerves before game time.

“I’m still a real young player in this league,” Thompson said prior to the victory. “I get nervous before almost every game. It’s like an anxious feeling; I just want to get out there and play.”

It’s a familiar feel for most young players, especially for lottery picks like Thompson who are given prominent roles early on. Thompson, in his second season, is still dipping his toes in what could be a deep NBA career.

“It’s not as bad as it was my rookie year,” Thompson added. “I feel a lot more calm and collected.”

His play in Friday night’s win was another sign of continued maturity from the young shooter.

Headliners Stephen Curry and David Lee are going to take the lion's share of the spotlight. Lee recorded his third career triple-double on Friday with 23 points, 11 rebounds, and 11 assists. Curry had a career-high eight three-pointers to score 27 points, delivering eight assists.

Those two have been the story all year and they’re building an even greater case to be named all-stars.

But it’s Thompson who is consistently rounding out the attack. Thompson entered the night averaging 15.7 points per game for Golden State and connected on 4-for-8 three-pointers against the Bobcats.

“He’s been special, and the scary thing is he is only going to get better,” Warriors coach Mark Jackson said. “These two guys in the backcourt is a thing of beauty. You’re shocked when they miss it.”

His teammates beam like older brothers when talking about the maturation of Thompson.

“He seems to have a lot better feel for the game,” Lee said following the win. “He’s always been one of the best shooters in the league, but he’s also making a lot better passes and he’s taking on a bunch of challenges defensively.”

Veteran Carl Landry added: “If you ask me, he’s an experienced player. He doesn’t play like a second-year player. At times we all make mistakes, it doesn’t matter what year you are, but Klay does a good job of adjusting to mistakes he makes and he’s becoming a better player.”

The balance of this Warriors team comes from the contributions of not just their two stars and Thompson, but also the even younger nucleus of rookies Draymond Green, Harrison Barnes and Festus Ezeli.

Jackson discussed the rebounding and paint protection of Ezeli, the off-the-chart intangibles of Green and the aggressiveness of Barnes.

“I have guys that want to be special, that want to be great, that love the game,” Jackson said.

Green continues to impress, and scored 11 points on the night. The Warriors also continued to get production from the bench tandem of Carl Landry and Jarrett Jack. Landry had 11 points and six rebounds and Jack tallied nine points and six assists.

“We have a great balance of youth and veteran leadership that is going to carry us to a lot of wins this year,” Thompson said postgame.

The Warriors shot 51.8 percent on the night and hit a combined 14-for-27 three-pointers.

Even Andris Biedrins contributed, playing 13 minutes and grabbing seven rebounds.

Thompson noted the balanced effort before the team’s win against Charlotte: “The biggest difference this year is the team atmosphere and team chemistry. No one is out there to get their own and just try to win.”

It was the 14th consecutive loss for the Bobcats (7-19), who were led by 23 points from guard Gerald Henderson and 12 points and 14 rebounds by center Bismack Biyombo.

The Warriors opened to a 21-4 lead and held a 58-49 lead at halftime behind seven-for-12 three-point shooting. Golden State is now a perfect 15-0 when entering the fourth quarter with a lead.

After allowing a season-worst 131 points to Sacramento on Wednesday, the Warriors held the Bobcats to 36.7 percent shooting, the lowest percentage of an opponent all season.

Follow @jimmypspencer for more Warriors news and analysis

Adonal Foyle issues 24-question quiz to Warriors fans

Adonal Foyle issues 24-question quiz to Warriors fans

Programming note: Watch SportsNet Central tonight at 6:30pm on CSN Bay Area, and immediately after the final horn of tonight's Warriors-Spurs game.

The Warriors went 30-52 during the 1996-97 season.

A couple months later, Golden State selected Adonal Foyle with the eighth overall pick in the draft.

Over the next 10 seasons, Foyle averaged 4.4 points, 5.0 rebounds and 1.8 blocks over 19.1 minutes per contest.

During Foyle's first five seasons, the Warriors won 97 games and lost 281 games.

Over the next five seasons, Golden State won 185 games and lost 225 games.

Foyle started six games for the 2006-07 "We Believe" Warriors -- his last season with the franchise. He retired two years later.

On Tuesday morning -- hours before the Warriors begin the quest for their second title in three years -- the big man posted a 24-question quiz on The Players' Tribune.

Foyle also included the following in his intro:

"In the spirit of what should be an exciting 2016–17 season , here’s a quiz to determine how well fans really know their favorite team. Older Golden State fans should score pretty well, while younger fans may learn a bit about the Warriors of the past. Answers at the bottom."

The 24 questions:

1) Let’s start out easy. Which bridge is featured in Golden State’s “city” logo?

2) Six Warriors have had their uniform numbers retired. Can you name them?

3) Don Nelson is the NBA leader in regular-season coaching wins. How many of his victories came as Golden State’s coach?

4) Why did the San Francisco Warriors rename themselves the Golden State Warriors in 1971–72?

5) When was the last time the Warriors hosted the NBA All-Star Game? (Bonus: Who won the slam dunk contest that year?)

6) Before it was me, who was the franchise’s all-time leader in blocked shots?

7) Golden State and the Cleveland Cavaliers have played in the last two NBA Finals. Who is the only player to have his number retired by both the Warriors and the Cavs?

8) Which fast food franchise named a burger after Chris Mullin and Tim Hardaway?

9) Name the Golden State player who had back-to-back 51-point games in 2000–01.

10) Name the four Warriors in the photo below.



11) Which We Believe team member is currently Golden State’s all-time leader in field goal percentage?

12) Don Nelson was an All-America when he was in college. Where did he go to school?

13) Everyone knows that Run-TMC was Tim Hardaway, Mitch Richmond and Chris Mullin. In 1990–91, when the trio got its name, what other two players were most likely to round out the team’s starting five?

14) During the 1970–71 season, the Warriors had a player-coach. Who was it?

15) Steph Curry is the franchise’s all-time leader in three-pointers made with 1,593. Klay Thompson is second all-time with 1,060. Who is third?

16) Jason Richardson spent six seasons with Golden State. For whom was he traded in 2007?

17) Two current NCAA Division I men’s basketball coaches are former Warriors. Can you name them?

18) When is this season’s Kevin Durant–bobblehead night?

19) If you’re taking BART to the game, what’s the nearest stop to Oracle Arena?

20) How did the We Believe campaign start?

21) What number did Latrell Sprewell wear when he played for Golden State?

22) Three former Warriors, including Baron Davis, were named the Gatorade National Player of the Year when they were in high school. Who are the other two?

23) Outside of the visitor’s locker room at Oracle Arena, there’s a hole in the wall that was made by an opposing player after a 2007 playoff game? Who was the player, and how did he make the hole?

24) Name the Warrior who wore number 24?

The 24 answers:

1) The San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge

2) Wilt Chamberlain, Tom Meschery, Al Attles, Chris Mullin, Rick Barry and Nate Thurmond

3) Nelly won 422 games in two stints as Golden State’s coach – from 1988 to ’95, and from 2006 to ’10. In his career, he won 1,335 games.

4) In the 1971–72 season, the Warriors played most of their home games in Oakland, but they also played six games in San Diego. The team was renamed Golden State in an effort to represent the entire state of California.

5) The Warriors hosted the 2000 All-Star Game in Oakland. Vince Carter won the slam dunk contest.

6) Joe Barry Carroll is second all-time in blocks with 836. Erick Dampier is is third with 728.

7) Nate Thurmond, originally from Akron, Ohio, had his uniform number retired by both the Warriors and Cavaliers.

8) McDonald’s branded the sandwich as the “Chris and Tim Burger” (or “Tim and Chris Burger” — depending on who you ask.) Toppings included an all-beef patty, barbecue sauce, melted cheese and crispy bacon.

9) Antawn Jamison scored 51 points against the SuperSonics in Seattle on Dec. 3, 2000. He followed that performance up three days later with 51-point night against the Lakers at The Arena in Oakland.

10) Kelenna Azubuike, Anthony Morrow, Anthony Randolph and C.J. Watson

11) Andris Biedriņš shot .595 from two-point range in six seasons.

12) Iowa

13) Alton Lister and Tom Tolbert

14) Al Attles coached and played that year. He won an NBA championship as the coach in 1974–75.

15) Jason Richardson (700)

16) Brandan Wright

17) One is St. John’s coach Chris Mullin. The other is Steve Alford, the coach at UCLA. (The Mavericks took Alford with the 26th pick in the 1987 NBA draft. He played part of the ’88–89 season in Golden State.)

18) The Kevin Durant Limited Edition Bobblehead Night will be on Monday, Nov. 28, 2016. Dolls will got to the first 10,000 fans to enter the arena.

19) Coliseum Station

20) During the 2006–07 season, Paul Wong, a 34-year-old Warriors fan from Alameda, spent about $7,000 out of his own pocket to create the first We Believe paraphernalia. It took off from there.

21) 15

22) Chris Webber and Al Harrington

23) In 2006–07 Dallas entered the playoffs as the No. 1 seed in the West, having won 67 regular-season games. The Mavs met the Warriors, the West’s No. 8 seed, in the first round — and ran smack into the We Believe train. After the sixth and deciding game (a 111–86 Golden State victory) of the historic series upset, a frustrated Dirk Nowitzki hurled a trash can at the wall on his way to the locker room. Today, Nowitzki’s autograph adorns a plexiglass panel over the hole, which has never been repaired.

24) Rick Barry

Durant falling in love with Bay Area doesn't mean he hates OKC

Durant falling in love with Bay Area doesn't mean he hates OKC

OAKLAND – Kevin Durant will not come out and say it with any real conviction. He won’t. He can’t. Not without being judged without jury.

He’s falling in love with the Bay Area.

Durant, having signed with the Warriors in July, is enthralled with the place one former local football head coach once described as “God’s Country.” He has spent recent weeks settling in and getting out and finds himself swept up in the charms of Oakland and San Francisco and other cities and towns – and the people within – that constitute one of the world’s unique locations.

What was speculated upon Durant’s July 4 decision to sign with the Warriors is being confirmed with each passing day. Though he is here to play basketball in a style he likes, with teammates he has bonded with, he also wants to dive into the Bay Area’s endless cultural smorgasbord.

This does not in any way indicate Durant suddenly hates Oklahoma City or the Thunder or the residents of the state due north of Texas. He called the place home for the better part of a decade. He opened businesses there. He donated his time and money. He gave to the area and the area loved him for it.

But the man clearly craved new experiences and sought new challenges, as well as a dramatically different vantage point. The window through which he views life is bigger in the Bay Area than it ever could have been in Oklahoma City.

Durant won’t say it. But the evidence continues to reveal itself.

He’s riding public transportation. He’s going to record stores – yes, record stores. He’s walking the streets and taking in the sights. He’s going to concerts and, for crying out loud, rubbing shoulders with the folks who shop the clearance rack as well as those who can afford tickets to see the Warriors.

“It was fun,” Durant said of his semi-organized tour last week. “Nike did a great job of coordinating everything. I just tried to get out and touch the people a little bit and let ‘em know I’m here.”

From BART with the people to Sunday night and the risky undertaking of joining the mosh pit beneath the floating stage on which Kanye West performed at Oracle Arena.

A four-time scoring champ and former MVP . . . in a mosh pit with about 3,000 people crammed on the arena floor.

“I used to take the train to school every day, to high school, so I’ve had that experience before,” Durant said of his BART excursion. “But the Kanye thing, that was different. It was fun, man. That whole experience was something I’ve never felt before. I was happy I was able to get the chance to go.

“It was nuts. It was nuts. Just seeing all the videos throughout the summer and never having a chance to get to a show . . . so I’m glad it came through here. I was telling all my friends the whole summer I wanted to get into a mosh pit. It was amazing.”

Could you imagine Kobe Bryant in a mosh pit? Tim Duncan? Michael Jordan? Durant didn’t care. This was something he wanted to do, and could do. He felt it. So he did it.

Judge him at your own risk.

This is Durant spreading his wings in a way he never could in Oklahoma City simply because he has entered an appreciably broader cultural zone. If he didn’t outgrow OKC – he doesn’t dare say that – he surely welcomes the vast societal and intellectual diversity of his new home.

Durant already was somewhat familiar with the area. His first NBA agent, Aaron Goodwin, is an Oakland resident. When Durant came to town with his previous teams, he would, if time permitted, visit ballparks and restaurants and other various attractions.

This is now his home. He said as much on Monday. And he obviously enjoys the new digs and all its trappings.

Durant loved what he had, and now he loves what he has. When someone moves out of one home and into another, larger home, does that have to mean he didn’t like the old place?