Kobe's 39 leads Lakers past Warriors, 97-90

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Kobe's 39 leads Lakers past Warriors, 97-90

BOX SCORE
LOS ANGELES -- The Warriors, playing without Stephen Curry and Andris Biedrins, lost for the 16th time in 17 games at Staples Center to the Lakers, 97-90. They finished their road trip at 0-3, and have now lost four in a row and are 2-5 on the season.Star of the game: Kobe Bryant did most of his work in the second half, scoring 26 of his game-high 39 points and helping the Lakers bounce back after being down to the Warriors 39-35 at half.

Key stretch: The Warriors were hanging in late in the third quarter, down just 57-56. But the Lakers finished the period on a 10-2 run, and took a 67-58 lead into the fourth quarter.The Warriors made a run or two in the fourth and cut the deficit to 85-82 with three-plus minutes remaining, but the Lakers ripped off six straight to put an end to that.Hes playing great, Warriors coach Mark Jackson said. Very aggressive, carrying that team offensively and hes their lone playmaker. Hes playing great, but thats no surprise. Thats who he is.
The real hurter was Bryants 27-footer at the buzzer over an outstretched hand that gave the Lakers big momentum.Its not enough to hang in there, Jackson said. Were not surprised about that You shoot that ball on the road, you outscore them three out of four quarters, you battle. Another tough loss but we did some very good things out there on the floor.Tale of two halves: Bryant seemed to be letting the game come to him in the first half, but he appeared to have enough of that once the third quarter came around. Bryant had 13 points at halftime going 5-for-10 from the field. Bryant took 11 shots in the third quarter alone knocking down six and just like that he had 30 points heading into the fourth quarter.Corner turn coming?: Warriors guard Monta Ellis, who finished 18 points, 10 assists and five steals, was pretty upbeat after the game, all things considered. He said he is no less optimistic about the Warriors after their 2-5 start than he was at the beginning of the year.This is a long season. Weve got a lot more games to play. Were going to turn that corner eventually. This is just a learning experience for this team. I still feel great about (this team).Jacksons first T: Jackson earned his first technical foul of the season with 2:27 remaining in the fourth quarter. He didnt get it for profanity, we know that. Jackson doesnt swear. So, what happened?I asked for a technical foul because my guys were working their tails off, Jackson said. And I refuse to watch them fight and come up on the short end.Bench play: Jackson went to his bench early on Friday and they produced. Nate Robinson, Ekpe Udoh, Klay Thompson and Brandon Rush helped lift the Warriors to an early 27-21 lead.Robinson was the teams leading scorer at halftime with nine points and thats what he ended up with. Thompson finished with 14 points, a career-high.I still have a long ways to go, Robinson said. Coach said play your game, have fun and be yourself. Its easy playing off Monta. Its fun. Were energetic and we play hard.
No Biedrins: Warriors center Andris Biedrins missed Fridays game against the Lakers because of a right ankle sprain and toe injury. Biedrins sustained the injury early in the San Antonio game on Wednesday.Kwame Brown started in Biedrins place against the Lakers.

Mullin sees potential Warriors-Cavs trilogy Finals going six games, but...

Mullin sees potential Warriors-Cavs trilogy Finals going six games, but...

As the defending champion Cavaliers are one win away from advancing to the NBA Finals, the consensus is they will meet the Warriors there and, moreover, that Part III of the trilogy promises to be the most compelling yet.

Chris Mullin is not so sure.

The Hall of Fame forward and current St. John's head coach, a guest Wednesday on the NBC Sports Bay Area Warriors Insider Podcast, perceives a reasonable chance of sweeping the series.

“I’m going on the record saying 4-2, just because maybe I want to see six games,” Mullin said. “I would not be surprised if it’s 4-1 or 4-zero. I think they’re that good.”

Recalling how the Warriors started sluggishly after a one-week layoff ahead of Game 1 of the Western Conference Finals against the Spurs, Mullin conceded there could be some rust but probably not enough to invite a loss.

“I don’t want to lay any . . . pressure, but the Warriors, to me, this team that we’re watching is going to go down in history as one of the best teams of all time,” he said. “I believe that. I think they will stay together and that’s we’re probably going to see four Hall of Fame players that have played together and have dominated and become a dynasty. That’s what we’re going to look back on.

“There’s just a huge disparity between them and the rest of the league -- and not just the Cavaliers. But there’s a huge disparity between them and the Cavaliers. “

The Warriors defeated Cleveland in six games to win the championship in 2015, but the Cavaliers recovered from a 3-1 deficit to take the rematch last June.

Though both teams have made substantive changes, Mullin is more impressed with what the Warriors have done, including the addition of four-time scoring champion Kevin Durant to a nucleus that included All-Stars Stephen Curry, Draymond Green and Klay Thompson.

Mullin pointed out that the losses of Andrew Bogut, along with subtractions to their fabled depth and chemistry, led some to wonder if the Warriors might lose the magic of the previous two seasons. He also understands that point of view.

“But as I see it now,” he said, “I think they’re deeper and have better chemistry than they did last year when they won 73 games.”

It’s not that Mullin gives the Cavaliers, who have won 11 of 12 games in these playoffs, zero chance to win the series. It is just, in his view, very slim. “Cleveland, they’ve got really good people,” he said. “Their talent, I’m not discounting at all. LeBron and Kyrie and Kevin Love, these guys are great, great players.

“I feel like the Warriors are just a notch above everybody. I really believe that.”

 

After postponement due to HB2 law, Charlotte to host 2019 All-Star Game

After postponement due to HB2 law, Charlotte to host 2019 All-Star Game

CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- The NBA All-Star game is headed back to Charlotte in 2019, a couple of years later than anticipated.

The NBA announced that the All-Star weekend will be held Feb. 15-17 in Charlotte and the game will be played at the Spectrum Center, home of the Charlotte Hornets.

The league had selected Charlotte to host the 2017 All-Star game, but later moved the game to New Orleans because of the state law restricting the rights of LGBT people. However, a compromise was struck in March to partially erase the impact of the House Bill 2 law limiting anti-discrimination protections for lesbians, gays, bisexual and transgender people.

"While we understand the concerns of those who say the repeal of HB2 did not go far enough, we believe the recent legislation eliminates the most egregious aspects of the prior law," NBA Commissioner Adam Silver said in a release. "Additionally, it allows us to work with the leadership of the Hornets organization to apply a set of equality principles to ensure that every All-Star event will proceed with open access and anti-discrimination policies.

"All venues, hotels and businesses we work with during All-Star will adhere to these policies as well."

Despite Silver's intentions, the Equality NC and the Human Rights Campaign has concerns that no protections for non-discrimination policies for the LGBTQ community have been put in place by the Charlotte or the state.

"North Carolina's discriminatory law prohibits the city of Charlotte from implementing non-discrimination protections for LGBTQ residents and visitors attending the All-Star Game. Nothing has changed that fact," said HRC senior vice president for policy and political affairs JoDee Winterhof.

The NBA is the latest sports entity to return events to North Carolina; the NCAA and the Atlantic Coast Conference also are bringing events back to the state after changes were made to the law.

The now-repealed House Bill 2 required transgender people to use restrooms corresponding to the sex on their birth certificates in many public buildings. That's been dropped, but LGBT advocates have denounced the replacement law because state officials took no action barring sexual identity and gender discrimination in workplaces, restaurants and hotels and instead prohibited local governments from acting on their own.

Hornets owner and longtime NBA great Michael Jordan said in a release he is "thrilled" the game is coming back to Charlotte.

"We want to thank Commissioner Silver for his leadership throughout this process and for the decision to bring NBA All-Star back to Buzz City," Jordan said in the release. "All-Star Weekend is an international event that will provide a tremendous economic impact to our community while showcasing our city, our franchise and our passionate Hornets fan base to people around the world."

Jordan asked Silver to keep the city in mind for 2019 after the league moved the 2017 game - hopeful the HB2 law would eventually be repealed.

Silver honored that request.

Hornets COO and president Fred Whitfield represented the Hornets and Spectrum Center in doing whatever he could to help facilitate a resolution, spending time meeting with legislatures and other business leaders in North Carolina.

"From the very beginning I was in engaged to see if we could not only save the 2019 All-Star game, but the NCAA (basketball) regionals and the ACC Tournament, as well as concerts and events in the building," Whitfield said. "We are operators of the building and we felt like we had to get engaged to assist to get some resolution."

Even as talks to repeal HB2 stalled at times, the Hornets continued to move forward with the league's request to upgrade the arena.

The $41 million renovation - $33.5 million of which came from the City of Charlotte - is almost complete, and has included a new scoreboard, new floor and renovations to suites and hospitality areas, among other upgrades.

Charlotte previously hosted the All-Star game in 1991 at the Charlotte Coliseum, which has since been demolished.

Pete Guelli, the Hornets executive vice president and chief sales and marketing officer, estimates a $100 economic impact for the city, but said the reputational effect will be even bigger.

"This city has changed significantly since the last time it hosted a game 28 years ago," Guelli said, "and the opportunity to showcase that on an international stage is incalculable."