Lee a better candidate for amnesty than Biedrins

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Lee a better candidate for amnesty than Biedrins

Yesterday I wrote that if Warriors owner Joe Lacob reallywanted to make good on his promise to make a bold move, he should considerusing the amnesty clause on forward David Lee, and erasing 68.5 million overfive years from the teams cap.The thrust of the post was this: If Lacob really wanted tochart a new course for the Warriors, now would be the time to do it. The tableis set beautifully to do such a thing.
Received some responses from people, saying that if theWarriors were going to go that route -- the overhaul -- then why not amnesty center AndrisBiedrins, set to earn 27 million over the next three seasons?Biedrins has been awful the past two seasons, andthere are no indications hes getting better anytime soon. Its just tough toenvision him turning it back around here. Love to see it, dont see ithappening.So, why then wouldnt you amnesty Biedrins? Well, two reasons.First, Lee would be a better use of the amnesty from amath and bottom line perspective. What is expected to happen when a player isamnesty-ed is that the NBA teams that are under the salary cap will have achance to bid for the players services.The waived players salary comes off the teams cap, weknow, but were talking about real dollars here. Anyway, the team that bids themost money gets the player, and then the Warriors make up the difference in theplayers overall compensation.If the Warriors used the amnesty provision on David Lee,there would definitely be teams interested. And why not? Hes a good playerwith a legitimate skill set. Nobodys denying that. The issue, however, is howmuch cap room hes taking up on the Warriors too much, and its going tohamper them going forward.But the larger point is that using amnesty on Lee doesntmean you have to eat 65 million. Not at all.Ill bet you there are teams out there that would want apiece of David Lee for 30 or 40 million over five years. Maybe somewhere Leeis the third-best player on the team, maybe even No. 4. Then you havesomething.Anyway, maybe you only end up having to pay half of Leesmoney. But youre not going to have to eat it all. But lets also make anotherpoint about Lacob and his ownership group. Hes called his ownership groupamong pro sports most dynamic and with pockets as deep as any other ownershipgroup.If thats really the case, eating 65 million is simply thecost of business, no? But again, the Warrior wouldnt have to eat it all.Bottom line is using the amnesty clause on Lee is a biggerbang for the buck (cap-relief wise) than Biedrins.But theres another reason to amnesty Lee instead ofBiedrins when playing the Whom to Amnesty? game: Biedrins is easier to tradethan Lee, so if youre going for a legitimate overhaul, the two moves can worktogether.Hey, Biedrins has been pretty lousy, no doubt. But everycontending team in the league wants as many big men as they can get, and someteam will absolutely want Biedrins. Now, dont expect the sun, moon and starsfor him in return, but you come out of it with a serviceable player and caprelief dynamite.Lee, on the other hand, youd have to trade with his 65million in tow, and thats a flat turnoff for every team. Like I said, theresa lot to like about Lee in another situation at less money. Thats my explanation of why Id rather use the amnestyclause on Lee rather than Biedrins. Though it just came to me that it likelydoesnt matter. Just cant see Warriors using the amnesty clause on either oneof them. Lee and Biedrins will actually be paid slightlyless than those figures Lee about 65-ish million and Biedrins about 25million or so because this years salaries will be pro-rated. Teamsusually play an 82-game schedule; this season because of the lockout its a66-game schedule.

Report: W's encouraged by KD's rehab, hopeful for regular season return

Report: W's encouraged by KD's rehab, hopeful for regular season return

When the Warriors announced the severity of Kevin Durant's knee injury, they did not rule out a return before the end of the regular season.

And based on the progress of his rehab, the team is "hopeful" but "cautiously optimistic" that Durant will indeed play before the end of the regular season, according to ESPN.

The Warriors have 11 games remaining on their schedule and their final regular season game is April 12 against the Lakers.

On Tuesday, prior to the Warriors game against Dallas, Durant was seen working out on the court and putting up jump shots.

Just a day earlier, Durant worked up a good sweat while riding a stationary bike in Oklahoma City.

Durant is expected to be re-evaluated by the Warriors' medical staff next week.

After initially struggling without Durant, the Warriors have won five straight games. Durant sat on the bench for the road wins in Oklahoma City and Dallas.

Over the weekend, Warriors PG Stephen Curry and PF Draymond Green addressed Durant's recovery.

“You can tell he’s making improvements and following the game plan,” Curry told the media. “I see him in the weight room doing cardio stuff trying to stay as close to game shape as he can while he’s hurt. You like to see improvements every day. We still don’t know when he’ll be back.”

“When he’s ready, we’ll know,” Green told the media. “But it’s not really our job to try to figure out every day how he’s doing. You can kind of see he’s getting better and you just leave it at that.”

 

Adonal Foyle recalls brutal first talk with Don Nelson

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USATSI

Adonal Foyle recalls brutal first talk with Don Nelson

SAN FRANCISCO -- He is among the greatest basketball coaches ever to walk a sideline. Creative and abrasive, accomplished yet unfulfilled, all wrapped in a 6-foot-7 package of Svengali.

Some say Don Nelson, who served two stints coaching the Warriors, was brutally honest, others insist needlessly cruel. There is little dispute, though, that “Nellie” could be as subjective as the sun is hot.

If you were one of “his guys,” you could do little wrong.

If you weren’t, you knew it early and you heard it often -- as former Warriors center Adonal Foyle, who was on the roster for 10 seasons, discovered in 2006.

“Don Nelson told me the first day he showed up at the gym: ‘You suck. You’ll never play for me. You make too much money.’ That was it,“ Foyle recalled Tuesday on the Warriors Insider Podcast.

“And he was having a cigar when he did it.”

Foyle, who returned to the Warriors in 2014 to serves as a Community Ambassador, clearly enjoyed his time with the “We Believe” Warriors, despite and because of the presence of Nelson. Foyle quickly learned about the two sides of Nellie.

Nelson had favorites. There was, in his first stint coaching the Warriors, Chris Mullin and Tim Hardaway, to name two. In his second stint, there was Baron Davis and Stephen Jackson.

Yet the list of those who could not seem to escape Nelson’s doghouse may have been longer, including the likes of Terry Teagle, Tyrone Hill, Sarunas Marciulionis and, later, Al Harrington, Ike Diogu, Marco Belinelli. Nelson’s most famous object of disgust was, of course, Chris Webber.

Foyle, who logged 1,824 minutes before Nelson’s arrival in 2006, played only 475 minutes in 2006-07.

“I knew I wasn’t going to play, because he made it clear,” Foyle recalled. “So I could be pissed off. I could be angry.

“I’m just going to be there. I’m just going to do my job the best way I could for that year. And I’m just going to learn. And I’m just going to help our where I can. I’ll help my teammates out. I’ll do the job that I’m paid to do.”

Foyle, the team’s all-time leader in blocked shots (1,140), scored a total of 107 points that season. His 50 blocks ranked third on the team. His ratio of blocks, one every 9.5 minutes, led the team.

The Warriors staged a furious rally to close the season, ending a 13-year postseason drought by gaining the No. 8 seed. They pulled off an epic upset, stunning top-seeded Dallas in the first round.

The Utah Jazz in the second round eliminated the Warriors in five games, the last played on May 15.

Ninety days later, Nelson and the Warriors bought out Foyle’s contract. He spent his final two seasons in Orlando and Memphis.