Lee a better candidate for amnesty than Biedrins

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Lee a better candidate for amnesty than Biedrins

Yesterday I wrote that if Warriors owner Joe Lacob reallywanted to make good on his promise to make a bold move, he should considerusing the amnesty clause on forward David Lee, and erasing 68.5 million overfive years from the teams cap.The thrust of the post was this: If Lacob really wanted tochart a new course for the Warriors, now would be the time to do it. The tableis set beautifully to do such a thing.
Received some responses from people, saying that if theWarriors were going to go that route -- the overhaul -- then why not amnesty center AndrisBiedrins, set to earn 27 million over the next three seasons?Biedrins has been awful the past two seasons, andthere are no indications hes getting better anytime soon. Its just tough toenvision him turning it back around here. Love to see it, dont see ithappening.So, why then wouldnt you amnesty Biedrins? Well, two reasons.First, Lee would be a better use of the amnesty from amath and bottom line perspective. What is expected to happen when a player isamnesty-ed is that the NBA teams that are under the salary cap will have achance to bid for the players services.The waived players salary comes off the teams cap, weknow, but were talking about real dollars here. Anyway, the team that bids themost money gets the player, and then the Warriors make up the difference in theplayers overall compensation.If the Warriors used the amnesty provision on David Lee,there would definitely be teams interested. And why not? Hes a good playerwith a legitimate skill set. Nobodys denying that. The issue, however, is howmuch cap room hes taking up on the Warriors too much, and its going tohamper them going forward.But the larger point is that using amnesty on Lee doesntmean you have to eat 65 million. Not at all.Ill bet you there are teams out there that would want apiece of David Lee for 30 or 40 million over five years. Maybe somewhere Leeis the third-best player on the team, maybe even No. 4. Then you havesomething.Anyway, maybe you only end up having to pay half of Leesmoney. But youre not going to have to eat it all. But lets also make anotherpoint about Lacob and his ownership group. Hes called his ownership groupamong pro sports most dynamic and with pockets as deep as any other ownershipgroup.If thats really the case, eating 65 million is simply thecost of business, no? But again, the Warrior wouldnt have to eat it all.Bottom line is using the amnesty clause on Lee is a biggerbang for the buck (cap-relief wise) than Biedrins.But theres another reason to amnesty Lee instead ofBiedrins when playing the Whom to Amnesty? game: Biedrins is easier to tradethan Lee, so if youre going for a legitimate overhaul, the two moves can worktogether.Hey, Biedrins has been pretty lousy, no doubt. But everycontending team in the league wants as many big men as they can get, and someteam will absolutely want Biedrins. Now, dont expect the sun, moon and starsfor him in return, but you come out of it with a serviceable player and caprelief dynamite.Lee, on the other hand, youd have to trade with his 65million in tow, and thats a flat turnoff for every team. Like I said, theresa lot to like about Lee in another situation at less money. Thats my explanation of why Id rather use the amnestyclause on Lee rather than Biedrins. Though it just came to me that it likelydoesnt matter. Just cant see Warriors using the amnesty clause on either oneof them. Lee and Biedrins will actually be paid slightlyless than those figures Lee about 65-ish million and Biedrins about 25million or so because this years salaries will be pro-rated. Teamsusually play an 82-game schedule; this season because of the lockout its a66-game schedule.

Warriors stay ready, strike gold amid the 2017 NBA Draft scramble

Warriors stay ready, strike gold amid the 2017 NBA Draft scramble

OAKLAND -- Considering their status as reigning champs without a pick, members of the Warriors personnel department could have turned out the lights and left team headquarters to watch the NBA Draft from a nearby tavern.

They instead stayed in business mode Thursday night, observing the draft-night chaos up close, waiting for the right moment and the right player.

And for the second consecutive year, the Warriors paid a team for its 38th overall draft pick, sending a reported $3.5 million to the Chicago Bulls in exchange for the rights to Oregon big man Jordan Bell, the Pac-12 Defensive Player of the Year.

“Everybody we talked to had a lot of good things to say about him,” president/general manager Bob Myers said. “He’s one of the few guys we looked at and really wanted to see if we could get. I actually was not optimistic we would be able to get him. But somehow it came to fruition.”

Myers added that the Warriors, along with many mock drafts, projected Bell as a first-round pick.

Bell led the Pac-12 in field-goal percentage (63.6) while shooting almost exclusively in the paint. The 6-foot-9 center/forward was sixth among Pac-12 rebounders at 8.8 per game and 13th in steals at 1.3 per game.

The Long Beach Poly High product possesses a wingspan a fraction shy of 7-feet and bears, by some accounts, a resemblance to Draymond Green inasmuch as he is a defense-first player with a deep reservoir of energy.

It’s a comparison that Bell, asked about it, embraces.

“Draymond, because people always say I’m undersized,” Bell told Basketball Insiders last month. “He’s one of those players you can’t really say what position he is, but he’s a force on defense.”

Moreover, Myers cited Green as one of the players best suited to mentor Bell.

“Draymond is a good one,” the GM said. “He’s not afraid to tell players what he thinks. He’s going to be a good teacher.”

Bell in three seasons became the Ducks’ all-time leader in blocks. He blocked eight shots in a Midwest Regional win over Kansas that sent Oregon to the Final Four. He became during the NCAA Tournament the first player since Hakeem Olajuwon (in 1985) to snag at least 12 rebounds in five consecutive tournament games.

“Defending is one of my best attributes,” Bell told Basketball Insiders. “Being able to switch 1-through-5. Play small ball. Blocking shots. Timing. Decision-making on offense.”

These are the characteristics that prompted the Warriors to put a red-letter “B” next to Bell’s name on their draft board -- even though his offensive skills are unrefined.

“We love his ability to defend,” Myers said. “He could probably defend most positions, and in the NBA that’s huge. To be able to switch pick-and-rolls, rebound, block shots, finish, there are a lot of boxes he checks.

“ . . . We just like the way he plays basketball. We’ll find a place for him.”

The Warriors also are closing in on a deal for one of Bell’s Oregon teammates. Forward Chris Boucher is expected to sign a two-way contract with the team.

“That’s something we’re trying to move toward,” Myers said of Boucher, who is rehabilitating an ACL surgery.

“But we like players that win. We like players that can play. I don’t care what school they are or what their background is, or what position. Winners. That’s what we’re trying to do, is win. If we end up getting that done, that’s another player that was on a very good team.”

Report: Warriors agree to two-way NBA contract with Oregon F Boucher

Report: Warriors agree to two-way NBA contract with Oregon F Boucher

The Warriors bought Oregon's Jordan Bell in the second round of the 2017 NBA Draft. And, they reportedly agreed with another Duck.

Golden State is signing Oregon forward Chris Boucher to a two-way NBA contract after the senior went undrafted, according to Shams Charina of The Vertical.

Boucher, at 6-foot-10 and 200 pounds, averaged 11.8 points and 6.1 rebounds in 31 games for Oregon this past season. He also averaged 2.5 blocks per game and shot 35 percent from beyond the arc. 

Boucher suffered a torn ACL in the Pac-12 semifinals against Cal. 

NBA rosters will grow to 17 players with two-way contracts between the G-League and players will make a guarantee of at least $75,000. Players who sign two-ways contracts can make up to $275,000 depending on how long they are on an NBA roster.