NBA, players fail to agree after marathon talks

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NBA, players fail to agree after marathon talks

Players Association president Derek Fisher used the word "disappointing" to describe the latest proposal from NBA owners after emerging from two days of intense talks.

"At this time it's not enough to really entice us to try to finish things tonight," Fisher said Thursday, in a press conference in New York.

Still, Fisher and union chief Billy Hunter will take the proposal to each team's player representatives to gauge whether the players' association should vote on the proposal, reject it or try to continue to tweak it.

Fisher said that the revised NBA deal doesn't meet on all system issues, but commissioner David Stern indicated it very well could be the NBA's last offer. If the players don't take this deal, Stern said the owners would reset their proposal and it would be worse.

The players earned 57 percent of basketball-related income under the old collective bargaining agreement. They have agreed to come down to 50 percent or very near that figure. But Stern said if the current deal weren't accepted, the owners new offer would call for players to get only 47 percent of BRI.

"Obviously, we would like to keep negotiating and find a way to get a deal done. But right now it's not that time," Fisher said.

Stern followed Fisher and Hunter to the podium and indicated that the revised proposal was the "best attempt" to address the concerns that the players expressed last week. Stern made it clear that the owners were done negotiating.

"We both realize the seriousness of what we're facing," Stern said, adding "... we await the response from the union. We did our best."

According to reports, the league has proposed what is being called a mini mid-level exception worth 2.5 million to be used under certain circumstances. The league will also raise the minimum team salaries from 75 percent of what the salary cap is to 85 percent of the cap.

Stern said the proposal would allow a season to start Dec. 15 if accepted, with a 72- game schedule. That would require moving the playoffs and The Finals back a week, according to Adam Silver, the NBA's deputy commissioner.

Hunter says union hopes to meet with players reps on revised NBA offer in New York on Monday or Tuesday.

According to Hunter, there is no deadline and that the revised offer will remain on table until the union gets back to league.

"It's been a long haul. Were coming to the end of it and trying to get this thing done."

Hunter said that in addition to six or seven primary elements needing to be worked out, the salary cap chief among them, there are 30 to 40 unresolved issues. Those ancillary issures totaled six pages, including items such as the draft age and the commissioner's disciplinary rights.

Does Draymond still care about DPOY after another ring? 'At this point...'

Does Draymond still care about DPOY after another ring? 'At this point...'

OAKLAND -- Even though Draymond Green still would like to win the NBA Defensive Player of the Year award, winning a championship with the Warriors has quenched much of thirst for the honor.

“I don’t really care that much anymore,” Green said after participating in the JaVale McGee Celebrity softball game Saturday at the Oakland Coliseum benefitting the Jug Life Foundation, promoting a healthy lifestyle around water consumption.

“I cared before,” Green added. “But we won the NBA championship now. I don’t care about what happened in the regular season any more at this point. I think I would have cared if I found out in Round 1 or Round 2 (of the playoffs).

“But at this point . . . I don’t even care any more.”

This is in marked contrast to what Green expressed early in the regular season, when he acknowledged the DPOY award is the only individual award he actively cared to win.

As recently as two months ago, in discussing his defensive performance in a season during which he made numerous memorable plays, including some game-saving defensive stands, Green let his words speak on his behalf.

“It is the best defensive season I’ve had, because I’ve continued to grow,” he said at the end of the regular season. “When I look at the last couple years, I think each year I got better defensively. And I think this year I’ve gotten better. So I do think it’s my best season, defensively -- but just not numbers-wise. The numbers are up a little bit more. But I actually feel better about what I’ve done on the defensive end than I have in any other year.”

Winning a championship apparently has an impact on the significance of individual awards.

A finalist for the award for which he finished second in each of the past two seasons, Green said Saturday that his plan is to leave for New York on Sunday and be in attendance when the awards are presented Monday night.

The other finalists for the award are Jazz center Rudy Gobert and Spurs forward Kawhi Leonard, who won it the last two seasons.

All three players will be among those at Basketball City at Pier 36 in New York for the inaugural telecast of the NBA Awards on TNT.

Durant fires back at salty Thunder fans with custom cupcake hat

Durant fires back at salty Thunder fans with custom cupcake hat

Kevin Durant didn't forget about the taunts.

In February, when Durant returned to Oklahoma City for the first time as a member of the Warriors, Thunder fans heckled him with t-shirts featuring cupcakes, a reference to Durant being soft for joining the 73-win Warriors.

On Saturday, the cupcake graphic made a return with one slight change.

Durant, playing in JaVale McGee's JugLife Celebrity Softball game at the Oakland Coliseum on Saturday, showed up to the stadium wearing a cupcake hat. But instead of a cheery on top, a championship ring was superimposed on top of the cupcake.

So Durant, an NBA champion, got the last laugh.