Nets stun Warriors at Oracle


Nets stun Warriors at Oracle


Nets 102, Warriors 100Player of the game: Nets forward Gerald Wallace scored 24 points, grabbed 18 rebounds and handed out five assists as New Jersey overcame a 19-point deficit to beat Golden State.Wallace also had the games biggest defensive play, when he blocked a Charles Jenkins attempt in the final seconds as the Warriors tried to tie the game.Key play: Gerald Greens drive and floater in the lane with 51 seconds remaining was the basket that put New Jersey up 102-100. It was Greens second consecutive bucket. His dunk on the possession before had tied the game 100-100 with 1:27 remaining.Green finished with 20 points in 28 minutes.Warriors in control: The Warriors used a 12-2 run in the second quarter to pull away from the Nets and establish control of the game. The run was sparked by the bench and it turned a 28-24 lead into a 40-26 advantage.Center Mickell Gladness scored two buckets during the stretch and Brandon Rush and Dominic McGuire each had a basket.The Warriors would expand that lead in the second half, going up 19 points at one point before the Nets rallied for the victory. New Jersey outscored the Warriors 32-16 in the fourth quarter.Lee dominant: Lee was absolutely fantastic in the first half, scoring 22 points on 10-of-13 shooting. He only had three rebounds in the first half, but that could be excused because the Warriors were hanging even on the glass.Youve got to believe Lee remembered the last time the Warriors played the Nets back on Jan. 18 in New Jersey. On that night, Lee was outplayed by Kris Humphries, and the Warriors interior was dominated.Humphries had 18 points and 15 rebounds in the Nets 107-100 victory. In that game, the Nets won the battle of the glass 45-26.Unfortunately for the Warriors, Lee didnt do much in the second half, scoring just four points and finishing with 27. Lee did score off a post-up move with 1:45 remaining to give the Warriors a 100-98 lead their last lead of the night.Rush rolling: Brandon Rush once again gave the Warriors a lift on the bench, and they needed it on this night. Rush made all four of his field goal attempts in the first half, scoring nine points in 17 minutes.Rushs contribution was needed because starting shooting guard Klay Thompson got into early foul trouble and was no factor in the first half, going just 2-for-7 from the field.Dominic McGuire also chipped in off the bench with six points and six rebounds in the half.Rookie matchup: Fridays game featured two of the better NBA rookies this season Klay Thompson and Marshon Brooks. Thompson is averaging 10.5 points per game, ranking him sixth among rookies in scoring.Brooks is averaging 12.8 points per game, second among first-year players.

Warriors go from the hot to the hotter with Pelicans' Davis

Warriors go from the hot to the hotter with Pelicans' Davis

NEW ORLEANS – There may come a time when the Warriors appreciate this, when they look back at the flames through which they have passed and survived, having sustained only moderate burns.

Until then, though, they’ll have to dance with fire. Torched by Spurs All-Star big man LaMarcus Aldridge on Tuesday, the Warriors now confront Pelicans All-Star power forward Anthony Davis.

That would be the Anthony Davis, the 6-foot-10 talent who in the season opener Wednesday night gave New Orleans 50 points, 16 rebounds, seven steals, five assists and four blocks.

“We watched the tape today,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said Thursday evening, after the team practiced upon arrival in the Bayou. “Scary. Scary.”

Davis has become the great player who gets overlooked, mostly because injuries have nagged him in each of his first four NBA seasons; he has missed at least 14 games every year. Once widely considered the league’s brightest under-25 star, he’s still only 23 but has to remind observers of his considerable talents.

A 50-16-7-5-4 line served as a potent reminder, even if Davis posted it in a 107-102 loss to the Denver Nuggets.

“I was telling one our coaches,” Kerr said, “he looks to me like . . . ‘You ever see a pickup game where there’s a high-school kid playing but everybody else is 12? And the 12-year-olds are good, but the high-school kid is physically posting up, knocking people around, shooting jumpers, doing whatever he wants. That’s Anthony.

“He’s so big and so skilled, you can’t believe that the skill can come in that body. There are guys who are Anthony’s size around the league, but most of them are screen-setters and defenders. This guy plays like a point guard.”

Davis is more skilled than Aldridge, but is an inch shorter and doesn’t have the brawny physique. Aldridge had his way with any defender he saw, totaling 26 points, 14 rebounds and three assists in a 129-100 pasting of the Warriors. Draymond Green’s past success against Aldridge was of no benefit.

So this represents a chance for Green – one of the league’s best defenders – to acquit himself. He will draw Davis at the start, but Kerr was quick to say Kevin Durant – at 6-10 (or so) a fairer physical matchup – also will get chances.

“We’ll see how the game goes,” Kerr said. “And we’ll try to find something that works.

“Obviously, we want to slow him down. But I’m just thrilled for him, that he’s healthy and playing. I know he got hurt during preseason, so it’s good to see him back this quickly. We’ll have our hands full. But that’s a challenge that we look forward to.”

Durant finds motivation in those doubting his hunger

Durant finds motivation in those doubting his hunger

NEW ORLEANS – It’s early Thursday night and practice is over and the Warriors, one by one, have filed out of Smoothie King Center and onto one of two team buses.

Only one player remains: Kevin Durant, the 6-foot-9 forward, a nine-year NBA veteran with four NBA scoring titles and an MVP trophy among his possessions.

Durant at one end of the court continues to go through his vast arsenal of offensive moves. The drop-step. The step-back. The swipe. The spin-and-dunk. Sweat drips from his chin, his arms and his gray Warriors T-shirt. He’s talking to himself. He’s destroying Chris DeMarco, a 6-8 former small college power forward who has evolved into a valuable but oft-abused assistant coach.

“They say I’m not hungry,” Durant barks out at one point, before sprinting into a corner and launching a 3-pointer and then sprinting to the top of the key for another trey.

By now DeMarco, also soaked his perspiration, is watching from a seat on the bench. No matter. He rises yet again to go back at Durant in a matchup that feels very much like championship fighter and sparring partner.

Durant finally ends the functional torture of DeMarco and flops into a seat.

“How much fun do you have beating up on DeMarco,” he is asked.

Durant breaks into a grin.

“Those are people that you don’t really get to know, get to see, that contribute to success,” Durant says. “DeMarco, ever since I got here he’s been helping get better. He lets me beat up on him and work on my game. It’s easy to just go out there by yourself. But just having another voice and having token defense out there definitely helps. I’m just trying to get better, man.

“That’s what I’m all about.”

When asked about his “hungry” remark, Durant reveals a bit of himself. Like many sports superstars, he hears the chatter and absorbs the slights. Though the comment was made in earshot of a few reporters, it shines a light into the psychological games he plays with himself.

“That’s what I say to myself when I’m working,” he says. “I hear it all the time. You hear the noise. You hear what they say about you. Everybody hears it.

“So it’s a little extra motivation when I’m out there. Nobody in this arena right now, and that’s when you get better. Nobody sees you when you’re doing this stuff right here. But luckily, y’all were in here watching.”

Durant is on a roll now. He’s loose, he’s feeling good and he’s pulling off the mask.

“You hear that stuff and you just use it fuel,” he says. “You don’t let it affect you, obviously, but when you’re out on the court you just try to use it as fuel. And keep getting better. That’s how I am.”

Asked if he reads the criticism, Durant takes only a fraction of a step backward.

“It’s not that I read it,” he says. “It’s just in the air. It’s in the atmosphere, and people tell you and you hear about it and (reporters) ask me questions about it all the time. So, obviously, I know.

“But I’m not losing sleep on it. It’s just wood on that fire. You just keep always wanting to get better.”

Which opens the door to the subject of opening night, when the Warriors were manhandled in a 129-100 loss to San Antonio, prompting spirited debate among street-corner coaches and general managers.

“Obviously, you’re going to hear everything,” he says, grinning. “ ‘The season is over.’ ‘The team is the worst team in the league.’

“You thought it was going to be easy? It’s one game,” he adds. I remember losing in the playoffs by 30 or beating someone by 30 in Game 1 of the playoffs, and you say it’s only one game. And it’s one game in 82, and you (expletive) guys are making it feel like the world is ending.”

Durant is out of his chair. Still sweating, walks toward the exit to get on the bus.

He did what he felt he needed to do to get better. He said what he felt he needed to say, responding to critics. And he did it all with no less than a trace of a smile.