Q&A -- Warriors assistant GM Bob Myers

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Q&A -- Warriors assistant GM Bob Myers

Warriors assistant general manager Bob Myers is like mostothers in the teams front office -- awaiting the start of the 2011-12 season.Its been more than six months since Myers gave up being an agent and took ajob in Golden States front office.I had a chance to catch up with Myers to find out how hesdoing in his job and what will happen once the lockout ends.Question: What have you been doing?Myers: I get asked that a lot. For us,with all the changes in the organization weve had to do quite a bit -- all newcoaching staff, new trainer, new strength coach, just hired security for theteam. Im working with our president Rick Welts, hiring a generalcounsel.Were running out of people to hire. After that, itsgetting ready for when we can go back to work.Question: Will this be challengingbecause when you head into free agency and training camp its likely to becompressed because of the lockout?Myers: I think this will be different foreverybody. Everything is going to get squeezed. Preparation will be key.Approaching it from the other side for me will be different. First time doingit.Its still the same game, so to speak, for lack of a betterword. Ill see it from a different angle. I feel like Im more of a buyer thana seller now. But youve still got to make the best decision and inevitablyyoure still negotiating.Relationships will be key. Information its alwaysimportant to have the best information. But it will be different for me thefirst time around.Question: Youre going to have a youngteam Have you talked in general what your strategy will be once the lockoutends?Myers: Weve had a lot of time to go overwhat the steps will be once this is resolved. There are three ways to improveyour team: Draft, free agency and trades.Well, the draft has come and gone. You hope youve made theright decisions there and we think we did.Then theres trades that you explore. A lot of things havebeen put on hiatus. And theres free agency. You explore all of them. Theinteresting thing now because the period will be shortened, the question ishow do you accomplish a lot of the things in a short amount of time? Youregoing to have a of balls in the air and a lot of different variables to dealwith. Some of the decisions you make will have a domino effect.Once certain players have signed, take them off your wantedlist. Youre constantly going through the process, processing information andseeing how it helps your team. The more efficient and the more diligent you canbe in that process the better youll come out of it.I dont think you want to make rash decisions. In sports,there is always emotion when it comes to making a decision. So you have to becareful to make the right decision without letting emotion or short-termthinking play into it at all.Question: You guys have reshaped theentire front office. How is that going? Is that all done?Myers: I dont think theres anythingleft. Thats one of the things weve been working hard on. Its all new people,which is great, but everybody has to get acclimated with one another. Thatswhat were doing.If it was a whole new group in your office, even thoughtheyre all accomplished and experienced, youd still have to get to knowthem.So thats happening with the coaching staff. Were all goingto know each other. Were all going to know the trainers, strength coaches.Theyre going to know us. Thats good for our organizationspecifically.I get asked, 'Whats going on?' Our organization has made somany changes so this period has allowed us to get to know each other withoutthe pressure of time.Question: Youve got owner Joe Lacob, whois very involved. Youve got Jerry West, youve got you, Larry Riley. MarkJackson is someone who also has said hes going to want to know whats goingon. Is there a danger of too many voices?Myers: This is what I believe. If youhave people willing to leave their ego at the door and recognize theyre notgoing to have the best information or have the right answer all the time -- andbe OK with that, and say this time somebody else might have had a better way togo about it -- then it will be fine.Ive known Larry a long time. Ive known Mark a long time.Ive known Mark and Jerry 10-plus years. That gives you the ability to have thehard conversations when youve known somebody a long time.Certainly its Joes team. If there is a situation where someoneneeds to step in and make the final decision it will be Joe. Everybody knowsthat and nobody has an issue with that. The only time weve gone through it --and I can tell you as an example-- was the draft.Not everybody lined up perfectly at the beginning. But whenit came down to decide we were all on the same page. Will there be days whenone person doesnt think if it was their decision theyd make the same onewere all making? Of course. Thats OK. The mistake people make is allowing oneperson to make a decision without input.Jerry, whos been doing it so long it would beirresponsible not to listen to his experience. So, it makes sense to get a goodgroup together.

Suns forward: Durant joining Warriors made him easier to guard

Suns forward: Durant joining Warriors made him easier to guard

Jared Dudley and Kevin Durant were part of the same 2007 Draft Class.

Ever since then, Durant has been the toughest player for Dudley to guard.

The 10-year veteran acknowledged that defending Durant during the 2014 Western Conference Semifinals was his hardest assignment while speaking on The Ryen Russillo Show on ESPN Radio on Thursday.

"My worst time was going against Durant in the playoffs when I played for the Clippers and he was on OKC, and that was my matchup. And him coming down on the transition, and I'm thinking 'I know he can shoot the ball here and I can't touch him.' I just remember him crossing over and he takes one step from half court and dunks it. He's such a tough matchup because in the NBA, you can really get physical with guys, especially stars. So he shoots 90 (percent) from free throw, he can shoot the ball from three, so for me, he's always been my toughest matchup," Dudley said.

Dudley also discussed how it has become easier to defend Durant since he left Oklahoma City for Golden State.

"It actually made it easier, somewhat, him going to the Warriors because they have Klay (Thompson) and Steph (Curry) and he doesn't have that killer instinct, but overall, it's impossible," Dudley concluded.

 

Warriors' Brown still waiting on $100 he won from Cavs head coach

Warriors' Brown still waiting on $100 he won from Cavs head coach

OAKLAND — Mike Brown is ready for Tyronn Lue to pay up on a nearly two-decade-old bet. Yep, Lue owes him $100 and Brown plans to accept it at long last — perhaps even during the NBA Finals when they see each other.

All this time Brown never wanted the money he earned by beating Lue in a shooting contest when the Cavaliers coach was an NBA newcomer, yet Golden State's acting coach — who spent two stints leading Cleveland — joked how Lue can surely afford it these days.

"I'm glad he finally admitted that he owes me money because for many years he wouldn't admit that he owed me money. He does owe me $100 and since he got his new deal hopefully he can afford to pay me now," Brown said Saturday post-practice. "I asked him many time for it but he's denied it. He's denied that the game ever took place."

Lue insists he has tried to pay up — time and time again, to no avail.

"Mike, I owe him $100 from when I was a rookie. That's all I ever know about Mike," Lue said Saturday. "I tried to pay him and he wouldn't take the money so he says I always owe him. He's always been a great guy."

The 40-year-old Lue was rewarded with a contract extension after the Cavs' championship run last June for the city's first major sports title in 52 years. Cleveland overcame a 3-1 Finals deficit to the Warriors, and now the teams are preparing to face off for a third straight year.

"I think what it has to do with, it has to do with the fact he's got a nice, long, fat contract with the Cavs and he realizes that he can finally afford to pay me the money that he owes me for the shooting game back in 2000 or whenever it was," Brown said with a grin.

Brown acknowledged he cannot recall any other details such as how many shots each man made, saying: "I don't even remember, that was back when I was in shape and a good shooter. He'd kill me now"

"Yeah, he was with the Spurs and I was with the Lakers and we had a little shooting contest and I lost," Lue said. "He wouldn't take the money so from now on 19 years in a row always says, 'You owe me $100.' He won't take the money. Always been close to Mike and I like Mike a lot, respect him a lot."